What type of allergy makes your skin itch

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  2. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  3. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  4. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  5. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  6. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something.

They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

Should I stay out of the sun until my rash or hives are gone?

If your skin is already irritated or sensitive, exposure to UV rays and possible sunburn could cause you more discomfort. Take control of your condition by covering up and minimizing your time in direct sunlight.

In addition, some types of skin rash can be caused by the sun. Photoallergic contact dermatitis occurs when your skin has a reaction to an irritant or allergen after exposure to the sun.

Cosmetics, sunscreen, shaving lotion, and perfume can trigger this helpful of reaction.

Consult with your allergist to determine the cause of your skin reaction and the best course of treatment.

Could my skin reaction be caused by a food allergy?

Yes! A reaction to a food allergen can cause you to own a skin reaction love hives.

There are numerous possible causes for hives and rashes, so consult with your allergist to determine the cause of your symptoms and the best course of treatment.

What Are Allergies?

Allergies are abnormal immune system reactions to things that are typically harmless to most people.

When a person is allergic to something, the immune system mistakenly believes that this substance is harming the body.

Substances that cause allergic reactions — such as some foods, dust, plant pollen, or medicines — are known as allergens.

Allergies are a major cause of illness in the United States. Up to 50 million Americans, including millions of kids, own some type of allergy. In fact, allergies cause about 2 million missed school days each year.

I haven’t changed anything about my usual routine – what could be causing my skin rash or hives?

There are numerous possible causes for your skin rash.

Some types of rashes are caused by allergies, others may be caused by infections, skin conditions such as eczema or rosacea, or even just dry or damaged skin. Your allergist can assist diagnose the cause of your symptoms and prescribe treatment to assist you take control and discover relief.

What causes itching?

Itching is a symptom of numerous health conditions. Some common causes are

  1. Pregnancy
  2. Liver, kidney, or thyroid diseases
  3. Parasites such as pinworms, scabies, head and body lice
  4. Skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dry skin
  5. A drop of a purified liquid form of the allergen is dropped onto the skin and the area is scratched with a little pricking device.
  6. Irritating chemicals, cosmetics, and other substances
  7. Allergic reactions to food, insect bites, pollen, and medicines
  8. Certain cancers or cancer treatments
  9. Diseases that can affect the nervous system, such as diabetes and shingles
  10. A little quantity of allergen is injected just under the skin.

    This test stings a little but isn’t painful.

How Are Allergies Diagnosed?

Some allergies are fairly simple to identify but others are less obvious because they can be similar to other conditions.

If your kid has cold-like symptoms lasting longer than a week or two or develops a «cold» at the same time every year, talk with your doctor, who might diagnose an allergy and prescribe medicines, or may refer you to an allergist(a doctor who is an expert in the treatment of allergies) for allergy tests.

To discover the cause of an allergy, allergists generally do skin tests for the most common environmental and food allergens.

A skin test can work in one of two ways:

  • itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  • Taking lukewarm or oatmeal baths
  • coughing
  • Fish and shellfish. These allergies are some of the more common adult food allergies and ones that people generally don’t outgrow. Fish and shellfish are from diverse families of food, so having an allergy to one does not necessarily mean someone will be allergicto the other.
  • Use special covers to seal pillows and mattresses if your kid is allergic to dust mites.
  • diarrhea
  • Dust mites are microscopic insects that live every around us and feed on the millions of dead skin cells that drop off our bodies every day.

    They’re the main allergic component of home dust. Dust mites are present year-round in most parts of the United States and live in bedding, upholstery, and carpets.

  • trouble breathing
  • If your kid has a pollen allergy, hold the windows closed when pollen season is at its peak, own your kid take a bath or shower and change clothes after being outdoors, and don’t let him or her mow the lawn.
  • Peanuts and tree nuts. Peanut allergies are on the rise, and as are allergies to tree nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, and cashews. Most people do not outgrow peanut or tree nut allergies.
  • Animal dander.Proteins found in the skin, saliva, and urine of furry pets such as cats and dogs are allergens.

    You can be exposed to dander when handling an animal or from home dust that contains dander.

  • hives
  • A drop of a purified liquid form of the allergen is dropped onto the skin and the area is scratched with a little pricking device.
  • Insect allergy. For most kids, being stung by an insect means swelling, redness, and itching at the site of the bite. But for those with insect venom allergy, an insect sting can cause more serious symptoms.
  • Keep kids who areallergic to mold away fromdamp areas, such as some basements, and hold bathrooms and other mold-prone areas clean and dry.
  • Applying freezing compresses
  • Don’t hang heavy drapes and get rid of other items that permit dust to build up.
  • stuffy nose
  • Using moisturizing lotions
  • Dust. Numerous allergens, including dust mites, are in dust.

    Dust mites are tiny living creatures found in bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and upholstered furniture. They live on dead skin cells and other things found in home dust.

  • Allergies that happen in the drop (late August to the first frost) are often due to ragweed.
  • Pet allergens are caused by pet dander (tiny flakes of shed skin) and animal saliva. When pets lick themselves, the saliva gets on their fur or feathers. As the saliva dries, protein particles become airborne and work their way into fabrics in the home. Pet urine also can cause allergies in the same way when it gets on airborne fur or skin, or when a pet pees in a spot that isn’t cleaned.
  • stomachache
  • Moldsare fungi that thrive both indoors and exterior in warm, moist environments.

    Outdoors, molds can be found in poor drainage areas, such as in piles of rotting leaves or compost piles. Indoors, molds thrive in dark, poorly ventilated places such as bathrooms and damp basements. Molds tend to be seasonal, but some can grow year-round, especially those indoors.

  • Allergies that happen in the spring (late April and May) are often due to tree pollen.
  • A little quantity of allergen is injected just under the skin. This test stings a little but isn’t painful.
  • hoarseness
  • vomiting
  • Avoiding scratching, wearing irritating fabrics, and exposure to high heat and humidity
  • sneezing
  • Using over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or antihistamines
  • swelling
  • Cockroaches are also a major household allergen, especially in inner cities.

    Exposure to cockroach-infested buildings may be a major cause of the high rates of asthma in inner-city kids.

  • Soy. Soy allergy is more common among babies than older kids. Numerous infants who are allergic to cow’s milk are also allergic to the protein in soy formulas. Soy proteins are often a hidden ingredient in prepared foods.
  • Wheat. Wheat proteins are found in numerous foods, and some are more obvious than others. Although wheat allergy is often confused with celiac disease, there is a difference.

    What type of allergy makes your skin itch

    Celiac disease is a sensitivity to gluten (found in wheat, rye, and barley). But a wheat allergy can do more than make a person feel ill — love other food allergies, it also can cause a life-threatening reaction.

  • Clean when your kid is not in the room.
  • coughing
  • throat tightness
  • Mold. Mold is common where water tends to collect, such as shower curtains and damp basements. It can also be found in rotting logs, hay, and mulch. This allergy is generally worse during humid and rainy weather.
  • Eggs. Egg allergy can be a challenge for parents. Eggs are used in numerous of the foods kids eat — and in numerous cases they’re «hidden» ingredients.

    Kids tend to outgrow egg allergies as they get older.

  • Cow’s milk(or cow’s milk protein). Between 2% and 3% of children younger than 3 years ancient are allergic to the proteins found in cow’s milk and cow’s milk-based formulas. Most formulas are cow’s milk-based. Milk proteins also can be a hidden ingredient in prepared foods. Numerous kids outgrow milk allergies.
  • Pollen is a major cause of allergies (a pollen allergy is often calledhay fever or rose fever). Trees, weeds, and grasses release these tiny particles into the air to fertilize other plants. Pollen allergies are seasonal, and the type of pollen someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen.

    Pollen counts measure how much pollen is in the air and can assist people with allergies predict how bad their symptoms might be on any given day. Pollen counts are generally higher in the morning and on warm, dry, breezy days, and lowest when it’s chilly and wet.

  • itchy nose and/or throat
  • Remove carpets or rugs from your child’s room (hard floors don’t collect dust as much as carpets do).
  • Keep family pets out of your child’s bedroom.
  • wheezing
  • Allergies that happen in the summer (late May to mid-July) are often due to grass and weed pollen.
  • Medicines. Antibiotics are the most common type of medicines that cause allergic reactions.

    Numerous other others, including over-the-counter medicines (those you can purchase without a prescription), also can cause allergic reactions.

  • a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness
  • Chemicals. Some cosmetics or laundry detergents can make people break out in hives. Generally, this is because someone has a reaction to the chemicals in these products, though it may not always be an allergic reaction. Dyes, household cleaners, and pesticides used on lawns or plants also can cause allergic reactions in some people.

After about 15 minutes, if a lump surrounded by a reddish area (like a mosquito bite) appears at the site, the test is positive.

Blood tests may be done instead for kids with skin conditions, those who are on certain medicines, or those who are extremely sensitive to a specific allergen.

Even if testing shows an allergy, a kid also must own symptoms to be diagnosed with an allergy.

For example, a toddler who has a positive test for dust mites and sneezes a lot while playing on the floor would be considered allergic to dust mites.

How Do Allergies Happen?

An allergy happens when the immune system& overreacts to an allergen, treating it as an invader and trying to fight it off.

What type of allergy makes your skin itch

This causes symptoms that can range from annoying to serious or even life-threatening.

In an attempt to protect the body, the immune system makes antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE). These antibodies then cause certain cells to release chemicals (including histamine) into the bloodstream to defend against the allergen «invader.»

It’s the release of these chemicals that causes allergic reactions. Reactions can affect the eyes, nose, throat, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal tract. Future exposure to that same allergen will trigger this allergic response again.

Some allergies are seasonal and happen only at certain times of the year (like when pollen counts are high); others can happen anytime someone comes in contact with an allergen.

So, when a person with a food allergy eats that specific food or someone who’s allergic to dust mites is exposed to them, they will own an allergic reaction.

Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

What is itching?

Itching is an irritating sensation that makes you desire to scratch your skin. Sometimes it can feel love pain, but it is diverse. Often, you feel itchy in one area in your body, but sometimes you may feel itching every over. Along with the itching, you may also own a rash or hives.

How can I relieve the itching from my skin rash?

Avoid scratching!

Scratching your rash or hives can create more irritation and can lead to infection. Frequent baths followed immediately with adequate moisturization may assist ease your discomfort.

Allergists are specially trained to assist treat your condition. Your allergist may prescribe a cream or oral medication to assist alleviate your discomfort. Antihistamines and moisturizing ointments can also assist ease irritation and dryness. Recently, new medications own been approved, including an ointment for mild to moderate atopic dermatitis and a biologic for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis.

You can discuss these options with your allergist.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Allergies?

The type and severity of allergy symptoms vary from allergy to allergy and person to person. Allergies may show up as itchy eyes, sneezing, a stuffy nose, throat tightness, trouble breathing, vomiting, and even fainting or passing out.

Kids with severe allergies (such as those to food, medicine, or insect venom) can be at risk for a sudden, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can happen just seconds after being exposed to an allergen or not until a few hours later (if the reaction is from a food).

So doctors will desire anyone diagnosed with a life-threatening allergy to carry an epinephrine auto-injector in case of an emergency.

Epinephrine works quickly against serious allergy symptoms; for example, it reduces swelling and raises low blood pressure.

Common Airborne Allergens

Some of the most common things people are allergic to are airborne (carried through the air):

  1. Pollen is a major cause of allergies (a pollen allergy is often calledhay fever or rose fever). Trees, weeds, and grasses release these tiny particles into the air to fertilize other plants.

    What type of allergy makes your skin itch

    Pollen allergies are seasonal, and the type of pollen someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen.

    Pollen counts measure how much pollen is in the air and can assist people with allergies predict how bad their symptoms might be on any given day. Pollen counts are generally higher in the morning and on warm, dry, breezy days, and lowest when it’s chilly and wet.

  2. Moldsare fungi that thrive both indoors and exterior in warm, moist environments. Outdoors, molds can be found in poor drainage areas, such as in piles of rotting leaves or compost piles. Indoors, molds thrive in dark, poorly ventilated places such as bathrooms and damp basements.

    Molds tend to be seasonal, but some can grow year-round, especially those indoors.

  3. Dust mites are microscopic insects that live every around us and feed on the millions of dead skin cells that drop off our bodies every day. They’re the main allergic component of home dust. Dust mites are present year-round in most parts of the United States and live in bedding, upholstery, and carpets.
  4. Pet allergens are caused by pet dander (tiny flakes of shed skin) and animal saliva. When pets lick themselves, the saliva gets on their fur or feathers. As the saliva dries, protein particles become airborne and work their way into fabrics in the home.

    Pet urine also can cause allergies in the same way when it gets on airborne fur or skin, or when a pet pees in a spot that isn’t cleaned.

  5. Cockroaches are also a major household allergen, especially in inner cities. Exposure to cockroach-infested buildings may be a major cause of the high rates of asthma in inner-city kids.

Common Food Allergens

Up to 2 million, or 8%, of kids in the United States are affected by food allergies. Eight foods account for most of those: cow’s milk, eggs, fish and shellfish, peanuts and tree nuts, soy, and wheat.

  1. Fish and shellfish. These allergies are some of the more common adult food allergies and ones that people generally don’t outgrow.

    Fish and shellfish are from diverse families of food, so having an allergy to one does not necessarily mean someone will be allergicto the other.

  2. Peanuts and tree nuts. Peanut allergies are on the rise, and as are allergies to tree nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, and cashews. Most people do not outgrow peanut or tree nut allergies.
  3. Eggs. Egg allergy can be a challenge for parents. Eggs are used in numerous of the foods kids eat — and in numerous cases they’re «hidden» ingredients. Kids tend to outgrow egg allergies as they get older.
  4. Cow’s milk(or cow’s milk protein). Between 2% and 3% of children younger than 3 years ancient are allergic to the proteins found in cow’s milk and cow’s milk-based formulas.

    Most formulas are cow’s milk-based. Milk proteins also can be a hidden ingredient in prepared foods. Numerous kids outgrow milk allergies.

  5. Soy. Soy allergy is more common among babies than older kids. Numerous infants who are allergic to cow’s milk are also allergic to the protein in soy formulas. Soy proteins are often a hidden ingredient in prepared foods.
  6. Wheat. Wheat proteins are found in numerous foods, and some are more obvious than others.

    Although wheat allergy is often confused with celiac disease, there is a difference. Celiac disease is a sensitivity to gluten (found in wheat, rye, and barley). But a wheat allergy can do more than make a person feel ill — love other food allergies, it also can cause a life-threatening reaction.

Food, Medicines, or Insect Allergy Symptoms

  1. stomachache
  2. vomiting
  3. throat tightness
  4. trouble breathing
  5. swelling
  6. hoarseness
  7. wheezing
  8. diarrhea
  9. hives
  10. coughing
  11. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  12. a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness

Allergic reactions can vary.

Sometimes, a person can own a mild reaction that affects only one body system, love hives on the skin. Other times, the reaction can be more serious and involve more than one part of the body. A mild reaction in the past does not mean that future reactions will be mild.

What are the treatments for itching?

Most itching is not serious. To feel better, you could try

  1. Using moisturizing lotions
  2. Taking lukewarm or oatmeal baths
  3. Applying freezing compresses
  4. Using over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or antihistamines
  5. Avoiding scratching, wearing irritating fabrics, and exposure to high heat and humidity

Contact your health care provider if your itching is severe, does not go away after a few weeks, or does not own an apparent cause.

You may need other treatments, such as medicines or light therapy. If you own an underlying disease that is causing the itching, treating that disease may help.

You own an allergy when your body overreacts to things that don’t cause problems for most people. These things are called allergens. If you own allergies, your body releases chemicals when you are exposed to an allergen. One type of chemical that your body releases is called histamine. Histamine is your body’s defense against the allergen. The release of histamine causes your symptoms.

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen.

Pollen comes from flowering trees, grass, and weeds. If you are allergic to pollen, you will notice your symptoms are worse on boiling, dry days when wind carries the pollen. On rainy days, pollen often is washed to the ground, which means you are less likely to breathe it.

  1. Allergies that happen in the spring (late April and May) are often due to tree pollen.
  2. Allergies that happen in the summer (late May to mid-July) are often due to grass and weed pollen.
  3. Allergies that happen in the drop (late August to the first frost) are often due to ragweed.

Allergens that can cause perennial allergic rhinitis include:

  1. Mold. Mold is common where water tends to collect, such as shower curtains and damp basements.

    It can also be found in rotting logs, hay, and mulch. This allergy is generally worse during humid and rainy weather.

  2. Animal dander.Proteins found in the skin, saliva, and urine of furry pets such as cats and dogs are allergens. You can be exposed to dander when handling an animal or from home dust that contains dander.
  3. Dust. Numerous allergens, including dust mites, are in dust. Dust mites are tiny living creatures found in bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and upholstered furniture. They live on dead skin cells and other things found in home dust.

What does a skin allergy glance like?

There are several diverse types of skin allergy reactions that allergists treat.

Eczema (also commonly called atopic dermatitis) typically results in dry, sensitive skin.

You may experience red itchy patches. Eczema can come and go over time, and flare-ups may crack, ooze, and itch severely. It is extremely itchy and can vary in severity from mild (just dry skin ) to severe (red, scaly, thick, fissured and oozing skin)

Hives (also known as urticaria) are raised itchy bumps. Typically hives appear reddish, and will “blanch” (or turn white) in the middle when pressed.

Contact dermatitis is typically caused by exposure to an allergen or irritant. If you own red itchy bumps on your skin, especially at the site of contact with some potential irritant or allergen, you may be experiencing contact dermatitis.

If you suspect you own any of these conditions, your allergist can conduct an examination and do testing to assist determine the cause of your skin reaction and can recommend treatment to assist relieve your symptoms.

What Things Cause Allergies?

Airborne Allergy Symptoms

Airborne allergens can cause something known as allergic rhinitis, which generally develops by 10 years of age, reaches its peak in the teens or early twenties, and often disappears between the ages of 40 and 60.

Symptoms can include:

  1. itchy nose and/or throat
  2. stuffy nose
  3. sneezing
  4. coughing

When symptoms also include itchy, watery, and/or red eyes, this is called allergic conjunctivitis.

(Dark circles that sometimes show up around the eyes are called allergic «shiners.»)

Airborne Allergies

To assist kids avoid airborne allergens:

  1. Don’t hang heavy drapes and get rid of other items that permit dust to build up.
  2. Clean when your kid is not in the room.
  3. Remove carpets or rugs from your child’s room (hard floors don’t collect dust as much as carpets do).
  4. Keep family pets out of your child’s bedroom.
  5. If your kid has a pollen allergy, hold the windows closed when pollen season is at its peak, own your kid take a bath or shower and change clothes after being outdoors, and don’t let him or her mow the lawn.
  6. Use special covers to seal pillows and mattresses if your kid is allergic to dust mites.
  7. Keep kids who areallergic to mold away fromdamp areas, such as some basements, and hold bathrooms and other mold-prone areas clean and dry.

Other Common Allergens

  1. Insect allergy. For most kids, being stung by an insect means swelling, redness, and itching at the site of the bite.

    But for those with insect venom allergy, an insect sting can cause more serious symptoms.

  2. Medicines. Antibiotics are the most common type of medicines that cause allergic reactions. Numerous other others, including over-the-counter medicines (those you can purchase without a prescription), also can cause allergic reactions.
  3. Chemicals. Some cosmetics or laundry detergents can make people break out in hives. Generally, this is because someone has a reaction to the chemicals in these products, though it may not always be an allergic reaction.

    Dyes, household cleaners, and pesticides used on lawns or plants also can cause allergic reactions in some people.

Some kids also own what are called cross-reactions. For example, kids who are allergic to birch pollen might own symptoms when they eat an apple because that apple is made up of a protein similar to one in the pollen. And for reasons that aren’t clear, people with a latex allergy (found in latex gloves and some kinds of hospital equipment) are more likely to be allergic to foods likekiwi, chestnuts, avocados, and bananas.

Who Gets Allergies?

The tendency to develop allergies is often hereditary, which means it can be passed below through genes from parents to their kids.

But just because you, your partner, or one of your children might own allergies doesn’t mean that every of your kids will definitely get them. And someone generally doesn’t inherit a particular allergy, just the likelihood of having allergies.

Some kids own allergies even if no family member is allergic, and those who are allergic to one thing are likely to be allergic to others.

How Are Allergies Treated?

There’s no cure for allergies, but symptoms can be managed. The best way to manage with them is to avoid the allergens.

That means that parents must educate their kids early and often, not only about the allergy itself, but also about the reactions they can own if they consume or come into contact with the allergen.

Telling every caregivers (childcare staff, teachers, family members, parents of your child’s friends, etc.) about your child’s allergy is also important.

If avoiding environmental allergens isn’t possible or doesn’t assist, doctors might prescribe medicines, including antihistamines, eye drops, and nasal sprays.

(Many of these also are available without a prescription.)

In some cases, doctors recommend allergy shots(immunotherapy) to assist desensitize a person to an allergen. But allergy shots are only helpful for allergens such as dust, mold, pollens, animals, and insect stings. They’re not used for food allergies.

Food Allergies

Kids with food allergies must completely avoid products made with their allergens.

What type of allergy makes your skin itch

This can be tough as allergens are found in numerous unexpected foods and products.

Always read labels to see if a packaged food contains your child’s allergen. Manufacturers of foods sold in the United States must state in understandable language whether foods contain any of the top eight most common allergens. This label requirement makes things a little easier. But it’s significant to remember that «safe» foods could become unsafe if food companies change ingredients, processes, or production locations.

Cross-contamination means that the allergen is not one of the ingredients in a product, but might own come into contact with it during production or packaging.

Companies are not required to label for cross-contamination risk, though some voluntarily do so. You may see statements such as «May contain…,» «Processed in a facility that also processes…,» or «Manufactured on equipment also used for ….»

Because products without such statements also might be cross-contaminated and the company did not label for it, it’s always best to contact the company to see if the product could contain your child’s allergen. Glance for this information on the company’s website or email a company representative.

Cross-contamination also can happen at home or in restaurants when kitchen surfaces or utensils are used for diverse foods.

After about 15 minutes, if a lump surrounded by a reddish area (like a mosquito bite) appears at the site, the test is positive.

Blood tests may be done instead for kids with skin conditions, those who are on certain medicines, or those who are extremely sensitive to a specific allergen.

Even if testing shows an allergy, a kid also must own symptoms to be diagnosed with an allergy.

For example, a toddler who has a positive test for dust mites and sneezes a lot while playing on the floor would be considered allergic to dust mites.

How Do Allergies Happen?

An allergy happens when the immune system& overreacts to an allergen, treating it as an invader and trying to fight it off. This causes symptoms that can range from annoying to serious or even life-threatening.

In an attempt to protect the body, the immune system makes antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE).

These antibodies then cause certain cells to release chemicals (including histamine) into the bloodstream to defend against the allergen «invader.»

It’s the release of these chemicals that causes allergic reactions. Reactions can affect the eyes, nose, throat, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal tract. Future exposure to that same allergen will trigger this allergic response again.

Some allergies are seasonal and happen only at certain times of the year (like when pollen counts are high); others can happen anytime someone comes in contact with an allergen. So, when a person with a food allergy eats that specific food or someone who’s allergic to dust mites is exposed to them, they will own an allergic reaction.

Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

What is itching?

Itching is an irritating sensation that makes you desire to scratch your skin. Sometimes it can feel love pain, but it is diverse. Often, you feel itchy in one area in your body, but sometimes you may feel itching every over.

Along with the itching, you may also own a rash or hives.

How can I relieve the itching from my skin rash?

Avoid scratching! Scratching your rash or hives can create more irritation and can lead to infection. Frequent baths followed immediately with adequate moisturization may assist ease your discomfort.

Allergists are specially trained to assist treat your condition. Your allergist may prescribe a cream or oral medication to assist alleviate your discomfort. Antihistamines and moisturizing ointments can also assist ease irritation and dryness. Recently, new medications own been approved, including an ointment for mild to moderate atopic dermatitis and a biologic for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis.

You can discuss these options with your allergist.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Allergies?

The type and severity of allergy symptoms vary from allergy to allergy and person to person. Allergies may show up as itchy eyes, sneezing, a stuffy nose, throat tightness, trouble breathing, vomiting, and even fainting or passing out.

Kids with severe allergies (such as those to food, medicine, or insect venom) can be at risk for a sudden, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis.

Anaphylaxis can happen just seconds after being exposed to an allergen or not until a few hours later (if the reaction is from a food).

So doctors will desire anyone diagnosed with a life-threatening allergy to carry an epinephrine auto-injector in case of an emergency. Epinephrine works quickly against serious allergy symptoms; for example, it reduces swelling and raises low blood pressure.

Common Airborne Allergens

Some of the most common things people are allergic to are airborne (carried through the air):

  1. Pollen is a major cause of allergies (a pollen allergy is often calledhay fever or rose fever).

    Trees, weeds, and grasses release these tiny particles into the air to fertilize other plants. Pollen allergies are seasonal, and the type of pollen someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen.

    Pollen counts measure how much pollen is in the air and can assist people with allergies predict how bad their symptoms might be on any given day. Pollen counts are generally higher in the morning and on warm, dry, breezy days, and lowest when it’s chilly and wet.

  2. Moldsare fungi that thrive both indoors and exterior in warm, moist environments. Outdoors, molds can be found in poor drainage areas, such as in piles of rotting leaves or compost piles.

    Indoors, molds thrive in dark, poorly ventilated places such as bathrooms and damp basements. Molds tend to be seasonal, but some can grow year-round, especially those indoors.

  3. Dust mites are microscopic insects that live every around us and feed on the millions of dead skin cells that drop off our bodies every day. They’re the main allergic component of home dust. Dust mites are present year-round in most parts of the United States and live in bedding, upholstery, and carpets.
  4. Pet allergens are caused by pet dander (tiny flakes of shed skin) and animal saliva.

    When pets lick themselves, the saliva gets on their fur or feathers. As the saliva dries, protein particles become airborne and work their way into fabrics in the home. Pet urine also can cause allergies in the same way when it gets on airborne fur or skin, or when a pet pees in a spot that isn’t cleaned.

  5. Cockroaches are also a major household allergen, especially in inner cities. Exposure to cockroach-infested buildings may be a major cause of the high rates of asthma in inner-city kids.

Common Food Allergens

Up to 2 million, or 8%, of kids in the United States are affected by food allergies.

Eight foods account for most of those: cow’s milk, eggs, fish and shellfish, peanuts and tree nuts, soy, and wheat.

  1. Fish and shellfish. These allergies are some of the more common adult food allergies and ones that people generally don’t outgrow. Fish and shellfish are from diverse families of food, so having an allergy to one does not necessarily mean someone will be allergicto the other.
  2. Peanuts and tree nuts. Peanut allergies are on the rise, and as are allergies to tree nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, and cashews.

    What type of allergy makes your skin itch

    Most people do not outgrow peanut or tree nut allergies.

  3. Eggs. Egg allergy can be a challenge for parents. Eggs are used in numerous of the foods kids eat — and in numerous cases they’re «hidden» ingredients. Kids tend to outgrow egg allergies as they get older.
  4. Cow’s milk(or cow’s milk protein). Between 2% and 3% of children younger than 3 years ancient are allergic to the proteins found in cow’s milk and cow’s milk-based formulas.

    Most formulas are cow’s milk-based. Milk proteins also can be a hidden ingredient in prepared foods. Numerous kids outgrow milk allergies.

  5. Soy. Soy allergy is more common among babies than older kids. Numerous infants who are allergic to cow’s milk are also allergic to the protein in soy formulas. Soy proteins are often a hidden ingredient in prepared foods.
  6. Wheat. Wheat proteins are found in numerous foods, and some are more obvious than others.

    Although wheat allergy is often confused with celiac disease, there is a difference. Celiac disease is a sensitivity to gluten (found in wheat, rye, and barley). But a wheat allergy can do more than make a person feel ill — love other food allergies, it also can cause a life-threatening reaction.

Food, Medicines, or Insect Allergy Symptoms

  1. stomachache
  2. vomiting
  3. throat tightness
  4. trouble breathing
  5. swelling
  6. hoarseness
  7. wheezing
  8. diarrhea
  9. hives
  10. coughing
  11. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  12. a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness

Allergic reactions can vary.

Sometimes, a person can own a mild reaction that affects only one body system, love hives on the skin. Other times, the reaction can be more serious and involve more than one part of the body. A mild reaction in the past does not mean that future reactions will be mild.

What are the treatments for itching?

Most itching is not serious. To feel better, you could try

  1. Using moisturizing lotions
  2. Taking lukewarm or oatmeal baths
  3. Applying freezing compresses
  4. Using over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or antihistamines
  5. Avoiding scratching, wearing irritating fabrics, and exposure to high heat and humidity

Contact your health care provider if your itching is severe, does not go away after a few weeks, or does not own an apparent cause.

You may need other treatments, such as medicines or light therapy. If you own an underlying disease that is causing the itching, treating that disease may help.

You own an allergy when your body overreacts to things that don’t cause problems for most people. These things are called allergens. If you own allergies, your body releases chemicals when you are exposed to an allergen. One type of chemical that your body releases is called histamine. Histamine is your body’s defense against the allergen.

The release of histamine causes your symptoms.

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen. Pollen comes from flowering trees, grass, and weeds. If you are allergic to pollen, you will notice your symptoms are worse on boiling, dry days when wind carries the pollen. On rainy days, pollen often is washed to the ground, which means you are less likely to breathe it.

  1. Allergies that happen in the spring (late April and May) are often due to tree pollen.
  2. Allergies that happen in the summer (late May to mid-July) are often due to grass and weed pollen.
  3. Allergies that happen in the drop (late August to the first frost) are often due to ragweed.

Allergens that can cause perennial allergic rhinitis include:

  1. Mold. Mold is common where water tends to collect, such as shower curtains and damp basements.

    It can also be found in rotting logs, hay, and mulch. This allergy is generally worse during humid and rainy weather.

  2. Animal dander.Proteins found in the skin, saliva, and urine of furry pets such as cats and dogs are allergens. You can be exposed to dander when handling an animal or from home dust that contains dander.
  3. Dust. Numerous allergens, including dust mites, are in dust. Dust mites are tiny living creatures found in bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and upholstered furniture. They live on dead skin cells and other things found in home dust.

What does a skin allergy glance like?

There are several diverse types of skin allergy reactions that allergists treat.

Eczema (also commonly called atopic dermatitis) typically results in dry, sensitive skin.

You may experience red itchy patches. Eczema can come and go over time, and flare-ups may crack, ooze, and itch severely. It is extremely itchy and can vary in severity from mild (just dry skin ) to severe (red, scaly, thick, fissured and oozing skin)

Hives (also known as urticaria) are raised itchy bumps. Typically hives appear reddish, and will “blanch” (or turn white) in the middle when pressed.

Contact dermatitis is typically caused by exposure to an allergen or irritant.

What type of allergy makes your skin itch

If you own red itchy bumps on your skin, especially at the site of contact with some potential irritant or allergen, you may be experiencing contact dermatitis.

If you suspect you own any of these conditions, your allergist can conduct an examination and do testing to assist determine the cause of your skin reaction and can recommend treatment to assist relieve your symptoms.

What Things Cause Allergies?

Airborne Allergy Symptoms

Airborne allergens can cause something known as allergic rhinitis, which generally develops by 10 years of age, reaches its peak in the teens or early twenties, and often disappears between the ages of 40 and 60.

Symptoms can include:

  1. itchy nose and/or throat
  2. stuffy nose
  3. sneezing
  4. coughing

When symptoms also include itchy, watery, and/or red eyes, this is called allergic conjunctivitis.

(Dark circles that sometimes show up around the eyes are called allergic «shiners.»)

Airborne Allergies

To assist kids avoid airborne allergens:

  1. Don’t hang heavy drapes and get rid of other items that permit dust to build up.
  2. Clean when your kid is not in the room.
  3. Remove carpets or rugs from your child’s room (hard floors don’t collect dust as much as carpets do).
  4. Keep family pets out of your child’s bedroom.
  5. If your kid has a pollen allergy, hold the windows closed when pollen season is at its peak, own your kid take a bath or shower and change clothes after being outdoors, and don’t let him or her mow the lawn.
  6. Use special covers to seal pillows and mattresses if your kid is allergic to dust mites.
  7. Keep kids who areallergic to mold away fromdamp areas, such as some basements, and hold bathrooms and other mold-prone areas clean and dry.

Other Common Allergens

  1. Insect allergy. For most kids, being stung by an insect means swelling, redness, and itching at the site of the bite.

    But for those with insect venom allergy, an insect sting can cause more serious symptoms.

  2. Medicines. Antibiotics are the most common type of medicines that cause allergic reactions. Numerous other others, including over-the-counter medicines (those you can purchase without a prescription), also can cause allergic reactions.
  3. Chemicals. Some cosmetics or laundry detergents can make people break out in hives.

    Generally, this is because someone has a reaction to the chemicals in these products, though it may not always be an allergic reaction. Dyes, household cleaners, and pesticides used on lawns or plants also can cause allergic reactions in some people.

Some kids also own what are called cross-reactions. For example, kids who are allergic to birch pollen might own symptoms when they eat an apple because that apple is made up of a protein similar to one in the pollen. And for reasons that aren’t clear, people with a latex allergy (found in latex gloves and some kinds of hospital equipment) are more likely to be allergic to foods likekiwi, chestnuts, avocados, and bananas.

Who Gets Allergies?

The tendency to develop allergies is often hereditary, which means it can be passed below through genes from parents to their kids.

But just because you, your partner, or one of your children might own allergies doesn’t mean that every of your kids will definitely get them. And someone generally doesn’t inherit a particular allergy, just the likelihood of having allergies.

Some kids own allergies even if no family member is allergic, and those who are allergic to one thing are likely to be allergic to others.

How Are Allergies Treated?

There’s no cure for allergies, but symptoms can be managed. The best way to manage with them is to avoid the allergens.

What type of allergy makes your skin itch

That means that parents must educate their kids early and often, not only about the allergy itself, but also about the reactions they can own if they consume or come into contact with the allergen.

Telling every caregivers (childcare staff, teachers, family members, parents of your child’s friends, etc.) about your child’s allergy is also important.

If avoiding environmental allergens isn’t possible or doesn’t assist, doctors might prescribe medicines, including antihistamines, eye drops, and nasal sprays. (Many of these also are available without a prescription.)

In some cases, doctors recommend allergy shots(immunotherapy) to assist desensitize a person to an allergen.

But allergy shots are only helpful for allergens such as dust, mold, pollens, animals, and insect stings. They’re not used for food allergies.

Food Allergies

Kids with food allergies must completely avoid products made with their allergens. This can be tough as allergens are found in numerous unexpected foods and products.

Always read labels to see if a packaged food contains your child’s allergen. Manufacturers of foods sold in the United States must state in understandable language whether foods contain any of the top eight most common allergens.

This label requirement makes things a little easier. But it’s significant to remember that «safe» foods could become unsafe if food companies change ingredients, processes, or production locations.

Cross-contamination means that the allergen is not one of the ingredients in a product, but might own come into contact with it during production or packaging. Companies are not required to label for cross-contamination risk, though some voluntarily do so. You may see statements such as «May contain…,» «Processed in a facility that also processes…,» or «Manufactured on equipment also used for ….»

Because products without such statements also might be cross-contaminated and the company did not label for it, it’s always best to contact the company to see if the product could contain your child’s allergen.

Glance for this information on the company’s website or email a company representative.

Cross-contamination also can happen at home or in restaurants when kitchen surfaces or utensils are used for diverse foods.


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