What to feed cat with chicken allergy

Unlike an intolerance, a food allergy can affect both the gut and the skin, and is an abnormal immune response to an otherwise safe ingredient. Cat allergies are generally to a protein source such as fish or chicken. Cats most commonly develop food allergies between the ages of 2 and 6, and must be repeatedly exposed to the offending allergen (for example, by eating it every day) to develop signs of a problem. Those signs can include vomiting, diarrhea, flatulence, loss of appetite, itchy skin, hair loss or reddened skin.

Believe it or not, grains such as corn are not the most common cause of food allergies in cats.

If you’ve ever wrongly suspected your kitty may be reacting to an ingredient, however, you’re not alone: Veterinary Pratice News writes that most «food allergies» are misdiagnosed by concerned pet parents during a simple stomach upset. According to Tufts University Cummings Veterinary Medical Middle, the most common reported allergies for cats and dogs are chicken, beef, dairy, and eggs (and fish for cats).


What to Do About Food Allergies

If you or your vet suspect a food allergy, then it may be time to attempt a hypoallergenic cat food. Enquire your vet to give you their best recommendations; the only way to accurately diagnose a food allergy is with a strict diet trial.

If you are thinking about heading below to the pet store and picking up some new food yourself instead of visiting the vet, wait a minute.

This is a common pet parent error when dealing with a cat’s sensitive stomach. Switching diets around will only confound the issue and make it harder for your vet to figure out the correct way to treat your kitty’s dietary woes.

Most over-the-counter diets are also not considered hypoallergenic. Even if a food is labeled «fish,» there can still be trace amounts of chicken, beef or eggs present because numerous types of pet foods are made in the same facilities with the same equipment.

Just love a plain chocolate bar often warns «may contain traces of peanuts,» cross-contamination can affect pet food manufacturing similarly.

Proper food trials will take about 10–12 weeks in which your cat must eat her new food and nothing else — no treats, no scrambled eggs and no kitty toothpaste, unless it is cleared by your vet. If your cat has a true food allergy, then any sensitive stomach issues should clear up in 2 to 4 weeks. External symptoms love itchy skin will take longer to resolve.

A minimum 12-week meal trial is recommended for skin issues because it takes that endless for a cat to grow a new outer layer of skin cells (human skin takes about 39 days to turn over, according to Trade Insider). If you own been religious about your diet trial but your cat is still having problems, then the issue isn’t a food allergy and it’s time to check for other conditions.


Food Intolerance

There are numerous things inside and exterior the cat gastrointestinal system that can cause a cat’s sensitive stomach, including food intolerance and food allergies. Though they sound similar, these two issues are not the same thing.

Food intolerance can happen in cats of every ages, and it can be caused by food poisoning from spoiled food your cat mistakenly ate or a sensitivity to a certain ingredient.

A sensitive stomach from food intolerance can also happen when a cat lacks an enzyme needed to fully digest a certain food, has irritable bowel syndrome or is stressed.

Many things can cause stress in a cat, including boarding, moving, adding a new pet to the family, dental disease or pain from arthritis. If you notice that your cat is vomiting or has diarrhea and you suspect she may own a sensitive stomach, don’t change her food just yet. There may be another medical reason for her upsets. If her vomiting or diarrhea is severe or doesn’t clear up within 24 hours, it is time to get your veterinarian involved.


Easily Digestible Foods

Some cats with sensitive stomachs may need a change in food.

Your cat may not need to avoid eating a certain ingredient, but her type or formula of food could be part of her intolerance problem. One solution for a stressed kitty with digestive symptoms is switch to an easily digestible food.

Digestibility, in pet food research terms, describes how easily a cat or dog can process and get essential nutrients from what they eat. According to the Cameron County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the factors that most influence digestibility are the ingredients, ingredient quality and processing methods used in making a food. Foods for a sensitive stomach, love certainHill’s Presciption Diet® cat foods, include a combination of soluble and insoluble fibers, minerals and healthy fats to make them nutritious yet tender on your cat’s digestive system.


What Are Hypoallergenic Diets?

Hypoallergenic therapeutic diets are specially formulated and produced to be free of contaminating allergens that might set your cat’s sensitive stomach on edge.

Do yourself a favor and get the cat food that your vet recommends correct from the start, and follow every diet trial instructions carefully. If your cat sneaks anything else to eat, then you own to start the trial over again. Yes, you may spend more on this food versus a grocery store brand, but remember: you are investing in your pet’s health, and in this case, food really is medicine.

A truly hypoallergenic cat food uses hydrolyzed proteins, meaning that they own been broken below so far that your cat’s body doesn’t recognize the allergen allowing your cat to process the food as intended.

Another solution is to use a food with a novel protein love duck or venison, as these are protein sources that your cat might not normally be exposed to in other foods. If giving your cat treats is an significant part of her training, there are also hypoallergenic treats, but always check with your vet first. No matter the cause of your cat’s tummy woes, your vet can assist you discover a way to soothe them.

Contributor Bio

Dr. Sarah Wooten

Dr.

Sarah Wooten graduated from UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in 2002. A member of the American Society of Veterinary Journalists, Dr. Wooten divides her professional time between little animal practice in Greeley, Colorado, public speaking on associate issues, leadership, and client communication, and writing. She enjoys camping with her family, skiing, SCUBA, and participating in triathlons.

At Solid Gold we always own your pet’s health in mind.

With our research driven approach, we are continually analyzing ways to make each of our formulations better. Our research has shown that Chicken Fat is a highly digestible animal fat source and has high levels of linoleic (Omega-6) acid. Chicken fat not only provides a more natural source of Omegas fat in our foods, but also makes the food taste better. Chicken fat is a species appropriate, natural animal fat source and naturally provides your pet with essential fatty acids that they cannot produce on their own, but are needed for proper growth and development.

In addition to every of the health driven properties of chicken fat, it also improves the overall taste of recipes – making them even more irresistible to your pet!

If you’re worried that your pet could own an allergic reaction to chicken fat, you should know that food allergies are an immune response to protein.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

A dog or cat with a true chicken allergy reacts to the protein in the chicken. As pure chicken fat contains no protein, it should not trigger the allergic reactions that chicken meat or chicken meal would in a pet who is allergic to chicken. You can confidently feed our foods containing only chicken fat to your pet with chicken allergies. We recommend consulting with your Veterinarian for more details. Solid Gold offers several products that do not contain chicken or chicken meal.

Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet for dogs and cats. If the balance of excellent fats in their daily diet are too low, dogs and cats can develop dry, itchy skin, a dull jacket, diminished immune system and be more susceptible to other health concerns.

Choosing a food with the correct fat sources will assist your pet maintain their ideal body condition.

Chicken fat provides a natural source of Vitamin E and Omega-6, is highly palatable to both dogs and cats and increases the aroma profile for your pet. Every chicken fat used in Solid Gold foods is sourced from a high-quality source and undergoes the same rigorous, multi-step safety testing as the relax of our raw materials. You can feel confident your pet is getting the nutrition they need when you are feeding any Solid Gold diet.

So why did Solid Gold decide to make the switch to Chicken Fat from Canola Oil? Chicken Fat is a natural animal fat that is more species appropriate than Canola Oil, which is a fat sourced from plants.

Canola Oil is also frequently sourced from GMO plants and it was becoming increasingly hard for us to discover a non-GMO source of Canola Oil. As an animal sourced fat, chicken fat provides a balanced, high quality fat source to provide your dog or cat with energy, assist their organs function properly, and support a healthy skin and jacket and immune system. Chicken Fat boasts high levels of Omega 6 Fatty Acids, which we balance with Salmon Oil to provide Omega 3 Fatty Acids – keeping your pet’s skin and jacket healthy.

Which Meat Should I Feed My Pets?

This is a question we are asked constantly by concerned pet owners, when they own made the choice to swap to a natural, raw meat based diet.

When making a decision about which meat(s) to feed, these key issues are to be considered:

  • Nutritional factors
  • Suitability
  • Availability
  • Price
  • Farming practices
  • Processing
Venison

The meat sourced from deer, whether by hunting or farming, is known as venison (from the Greek, to hunt). It is also extremely high in protein and low in fat, and is an excellent choice as a unique protein source when managing food allergies.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

Venison is generally simple to purchase from butchers and some pet meat suppliers.

Pork

Pork is again high in fat and often not well tolerated digestion wise by numerous pets. Meat meal made from pig carcasses is used in the manufacture of some pet treats, but on the whole, it is little used. Pigs are also extremely intensively farmed in modern countries, and suffer a similar fate as battery chickens, being raised and housed indoors, and being fed a man made ration, finish with antibiotics and growth promoters.

Pigs are also highly sensitive to stress, suffering from a condition known as PSS (porcine stress syndrome), which can cause severe detrimental changes to the meat at slaughter.

Beef

Beef is one of the most widely available and most commonly used meat source for pet food, second only perhaps to chicken. Beef and beef by-products (by products indicating non-meat parts of the body love offal, bone, feet and horns) are the major red meat sources.

The majority of beef used in processed pet food is actually meat meal a combination of every non-useable or non-saleable body parts from the abattoirs (eg bones with meat scraps left on, offal, contaminated carcass parts etc) which is ground to a pulp and then dried at high temperature to produce a powdered product. Meat meal generally forms the protein component of dry foods, and is also used, in combination with milled cereal and gelatine, to form the “meaty chunks” in tinned pet foods.

Fresh beef is not as commonly used as pet food, often due to price constraints and demand for table meats and export. Nutritionally, beef can be fairly excellent, if it is raised naturally on pasture.

It has excellent amounts of protein, and can own fairly high fat content (14%+), and this level can be much higher in grain fed beef. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, beef is seen as a “heating” meat, because it originates from a colder climate. Beef is often raised using traditional farming practices, which include the use of chemical fertilisers, herbicides, drenches and antibiotics. Free range, organic beef can own a lower fat content than the traditionally farmed product, cost per kilo is higher.

Turkey

A shut relative of the chicken, turkey meat is becoming a more favorite choice of meat for pet foods.

It combines both 70% white meat and 30% dark meat, is both high in protein and low in fat (except for the skin). Turkey is a excellent nutritional source of iron, zinc, potassium and phosphorous, and contains vitamin B6 and niacin. Turkey farming is nowhere near as intensive as chicken sheds, and most birds enjoy a lot more space and outdoor time.

Goat Goat meat, also known as Chevon, Capretto or Cabrito, is the most widely eaten meat in the world. Popularity in Australia is increasing as diversity in population grows. Feral goat meat is now commonly fed as pet meat. Goat is available at numerous butchers, and is becoming more widely available in supermarkets due to the demand attributed to its use on television cooking shows.

Goat meat is lean and lower in fat and cholestrol than chicken, lower in calories than beef, lamb and pork and contains iron levels higher than beef. The taste is described as being similar to lamb.

Rabbit

Rabbit would own to be one of the most suitable every circular meat sources for both dogs and cats. Wild rabbit is extremely similar to kangaroo, in the sense that it is a free range, organic meat, low in fat, and high in nutritional worth.

Until recently, wild rabbit has been widely available in Australia, but due to the introduction of the Calici virus, the supply of rabbit meat has largely been replaced with farmed rabbit, which unfortunately can drop victim to every the same problems as battery chickens.

Lamb & Mutton

Lamb has recently become a favorite meat source for pet food, introduced a “unique” source of protein, driven by the increase in targeting allergic skin conditions in dogs and cats. Due to cost, that the majority of lamb sold as pet meat is actually mutton, older sheep. Nutritionally, lamb is extremely excellent.

It does own high fat content, much love beef, but it is every pasture grown, under excellent conditions, and the meat is of high quality. Lamb is also considered a “heating” meat, as sheep are native to freezing climates. Lamb shanks are however, a common choice for a excellent meaty bone.

Kangaroo

This is our preferred choice of meats. Unused kangaroo meat has been widely used in Australia as pet meat over 30 years, and more recently, it has made significant in-roads into the human food industry, with food professionals and nutritionists extolling its health benefits, grand taste and versatility as a premium table meat.

Nutritionally, kangaroo meat is superior to every the farmed meats. It is low in fat (3 – 4%), high in protein, and high in vitamins and minerals. Because kangaroo is not farmed, the meat is truly free range, and organic. Kangaroos graze a extremely wide variety of pastures, wild grasses, shrubs and trees, and as a result of this variety, they enjoy excellent health, and their meat has a wide array of macro and micro nutrients. Kangaroo is considered a “cooling” meat, as it lives in a extremely dry and arid environment, and as such, is ideal for treating pets with food allergies. Culling of Kangaroos is a extremely closely controlled, government regulated business.

Chicken

Chicken meat and by products are the most common source of pet meat used in commercial pet foods.

This is primarily driven by price since chickens are the most widely farmed of every the domesticated animal species. The commercial chicken industry’s methods are not based on the traditional image of chooks running around the farmyard. At the lower finish of the spectrum chickens are raised and housed in sheds (in cages) their entire life, and are fed a man-made diet from birth. They can suffer from vitamin D deficiency by not being exposed to sunlight, no green grass or shoots to feed on, and no natural antioxidants.

Antibiotics are often added to feed minimise the death toll, and a range of growth promoters.

However times are changing, and cage-free, RSPCA approved and organic chickens every offer much better choices. There is no doubt that wild chickens would be an ideal prey for both cats and dogs. The extremely fact that they are relatively slow moving, and fly only when absolutely necessary would put them high on the predation list. A wild (organic) chicken would also provide excellent nutrition, as do their eggs, both of which contain protein with a extremely high biologic worth, meaning they are easily digestible.

Fish

Fish meat is a extremely excellent source of protein, low in fat, and high in vitamins and minerals – when it is first caught.

If you were to purchase unused fish and lightly cook it for your pets, it would be extremely excellent. It is also worthy of note that freshwater fish do contain levels of thiaminases, which can cause vitamin B1 deficiency if used exclusively as a diet. Whilst cats certainly enjoy the taste of fish (probably the salt), they are the final animal to be seen getting their feet wet – so we must conclude that fish is actually not a natural part of the cat’s diet.

Cats can also react allergically to some of the deep water fish, love tuna, which can present as a generalised skin problem, with itching around the head and ears. Dogs may make the occasional attempts at catching fish in unused water streams, but the only true fisherman is their shut relatives, the bear.

Tripe

We will make special mention here of tripe as a meat source. Tripe is the common term for the stomach lining of cattle and sheep, also known as paunch. Green tripe is the term used for un-processed tripe and is highly nutritious as a meat source. It is extremely low in fat (2%), highly glandular (contains enzymes), and is loaded with probiotic micro organisms.

Tripe sold for human consumption has been washed in boiling water and bleached. In Australia, Green tripe is extremely affordable but not always simple to source, sold only as pet meat in a frozen state.

Tripe is also a “white” meat (meaning it has a low quantity of myoglobin, the protein that makes red meat red), and has historically been used for dogs with sensitive digestive tracts, or food allergies. We own seen tripe used successfully as an alternate to kangaroo meat for treating hard cases of allergic dermatitis in dogs and occasionally cats with grand results.

Offal

Offal is the collective term used for organ meats, love liver, kidney, heart, lung etc.

Offal is extremely wealthy in protein, vitamins and minerals, and ideally, should make up about 20% of a dog or cats meat intake. As a general law, offal meats should be purchased from your local butcher, and be human grade, as the organs are often home to various parasites, and only human grade organ meats own had additional inspection processes applied to ensure they are free of parasites.

Venison

The meat sourced from deer, whether by hunting or farming, is known as venison (from the Greek, to hunt). It is also extremely high in protein and low in fat, and is an excellent choice as a unique protein source when managing food allergies.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

Venison is generally simple to purchase from butchers and some pet meat suppliers.

Pork

Pork is again high in fat and often not well tolerated digestion wise by numerous pets. Meat meal made from pig carcasses is used in the manufacture of some pet treats, but on the whole, it is little used. Pigs are also extremely intensively farmed in modern countries, and suffer a similar fate as battery chickens, being raised and housed indoors, and being fed a man made ration, finish with antibiotics and growth promoters.

Pigs are also highly sensitive to stress, suffering from a condition known as PSS (porcine stress syndrome), which can cause severe detrimental changes to the meat at slaughter.

Beef

Beef is one of the most widely available and most commonly used meat source for pet food, second only perhaps to chicken. Beef and beef by-products (by products indicating non-meat parts of the body love offal, bone, feet and horns) are the major red meat sources.

The majority of beef used in processed pet food is actually meat meal a combination of every non-useable or non-saleable body parts from the abattoirs (eg bones with meat scraps left on, offal, contaminated carcass parts etc) which is ground to a pulp and then dried at high temperature to produce a powdered product. Meat meal generally forms the protein component of dry foods, and is also used, in combination with milled cereal and gelatine, to form the “meaty chunks” in tinned pet foods.

Fresh beef is not as commonly used as pet food, often due to price constraints and demand for table meats and export.

Nutritionally, beef can be fairly excellent, if it is raised naturally on pasture. It has excellent amounts of protein, and can own fairly high fat content (14%+), and this level can be much higher in grain fed beef. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, beef is seen as a “heating” meat, because it originates from a colder climate. Beef is often raised using traditional farming practices, which include the use of chemical fertilisers, herbicides, drenches and antibiotics. Free range, organic beef can own a lower fat content than the traditionally farmed product, cost per kilo is higher.

Turkey

A shut relative of the chicken, turkey meat is becoming a more favorite choice of meat for pet foods.

It combines both 70% white meat and 30% dark meat, is both high in protein and low in fat (except for the skin). Turkey is a excellent nutritional source of iron, zinc, potassium and phosphorous, and contains vitamin B6 and niacin. Turkey farming is nowhere near as intensive as chicken sheds, and most birds enjoy a lot more space and outdoor time.

Goat Goat meat, also known as Chevon, Capretto or Cabrito, is the most widely eaten meat in the world. Popularity in Australia is increasing as diversity in population grows. Feral goat meat is now commonly fed as pet meat.

Goat is available at numerous butchers, and is becoming more widely available in supermarkets due to the demand attributed to its use on television cooking shows. Goat meat is lean and lower in fat and cholestrol than chicken, lower in calories than beef, lamb and pork and contains iron levels higher than beef. The taste is described as being similar to lamb.

Rabbit

Rabbit would own to be one of the most suitable every circular meat sources for both dogs and cats. Wild rabbit is extremely similar to kangaroo, in the sense that it is a free range, organic meat, low in fat, and high in nutritional worth.

Until recently, wild rabbit has been widely available in Australia, but due to the introduction of the Calici virus, the supply of rabbit meat has largely been replaced with farmed rabbit, which unfortunately can drop victim to every the same problems as battery chickens.

Lamb & Mutton

Lamb has recently become a favorite meat source for pet food, introduced a “unique” source of protein, driven by the increase in targeting allergic skin conditions in dogs and cats. Due to cost, that the majority of lamb sold as pet meat is actually mutton, older sheep.

Nutritionally, lamb is extremely excellent. It does own high fat content, much love beef, but it is every pasture grown, under excellent conditions, and the meat is of high quality.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

Lamb is also considered a “heating” meat, as sheep are native to freezing climates. Lamb shanks are however, a common choice for a excellent meaty bone.

Kangaroo

This is our preferred choice of meats. Unused kangaroo meat has been widely used in Australia as pet meat over 30 years, and more recently, it has made significant in-roads into the human food industry, with food professionals and nutritionists extolling its health benefits, grand taste and versatility as a premium table meat. Nutritionally, kangaroo meat is superior to every the farmed meats. It is low in fat (3 – 4%), high in protein, and high in vitamins and minerals.

Because kangaroo is not farmed, the meat is truly free range, and organic. Kangaroos graze a extremely wide variety of pastures, wild grasses, shrubs and trees, and as a result of this variety, they enjoy excellent health, and their meat has a wide array of macro and micro nutrients.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

Kangaroo is considered a “cooling” meat, as it lives in a extremely dry and arid environment, and as such, is ideal for treating pets with food allergies. Culling of Kangaroos is a extremely closely controlled, government regulated business.

Chicken

Chicken meat and by products are the most common source of pet meat used in commercial pet foods. This is primarily driven by price since chickens are the most widely farmed of every the domesticated animal species. The commercial chicken industry’s methods are not based on the traditional image of chooks running around the farmyard. At the lower finish of the spectrum chickens are raised and housed in sheds (in cages) their entire life, and are fed a man-made diet from birth.

They can suffer from vitamin D deficiency by not being exposed to sunlight, no green grass or shoots to feed on, and no natural antioxidants. Antibiotics are often added to feed minimise the death toll, and a range of growth promoters.

However times are changing, and cage-free, RSPCA approved and organic chickens every offer much better choices.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

There is no doubt that wild chickens would be an ideal prey for both cats and dogs. The extremely fact that they are relatively slow moving, and fly only when absolutely necessary would put them high on the predation list. A wild (organic) chicken would also provide excellent nutrition, as do their eggs, both of which contain protein with a extremely high biologic worth, meaning they are easily digestible.

Fish

Fish meat is a extremely excellent source of protein, low in fat, and high in vitamins and minerals – when it is first caught. If you were to purchase unused fish and lightly cook it for your pets, it would be extremely excellent.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

It is also worthy of note that freshwater fish do contain levels of thiaminases, which can cause vitamin B1 deficiency if used exclusively as a diet. Whilst cats certainly enjoy the taste of fish (probably the salt), they are the final animal to be seen getting their feet wet – so we must conclude that fish is actually not a natural part of the cat’s diet. Cats can also react allergically to some of the deep water fish, love tuna, which can present as a generalised skin problem, with itching around the head and ears.

What to feed cat with chicken allergy

Dogs may make the occasional attempts at catching fish in unused water streams, but the only true fisherman is their shut relatives, the bear.

Tripe

We will make special mention here of tripe as a meat source. Tripe is the common term for the stomach lining of cattle and sheep, also known as paunch. Green tripe is the term used for un-processed tripe and is highly nutritious as a meat source. It is extremely low in fat (2%), highly glandular (contains enzymes), and is loaded with probiotic micro organisms.

Tripe sold for human consumption has been washed in boiling water and bleached. In Australia, Green tripe is extremely affordable but not always simple to source, sold only as pet meat in a frozen state.

Tripe is also a “white” meat (meaning it has a low quantity of myoglobin, the protein that makes red meat red), and has historically been used for dogs with sensitive digestive tracts, or food allergies. We own seen tripe used successfully as an alternate to kangaroo meat for treating hard cases of allergic dermatitis in dogs and occasionally cats with grand results.

Offal

Offal is the collective term used for organ meats, love liver, kidney, heart, lung etc.

Offal is extremely wealthy in protein, vitamins and minerals, and ideally, should make up about 20% of a dog or cats meat intake. As a general law, offal meats should be purchased from your local butcher, and be human grade, as the organs are often home to various parasites, and only human grade organ meats own had additional inspection processes applied to ensure they are free of parasites.


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