What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

In both gluten sensitivity, or celiac disease, and migraine, there is an inflammatory process occurring within the body. I hypothesize that the inflammatory response to gluten makes it easier to activate the trigeminovascular pathway, thus triggering a migraine. There has never been a large study of how exactly gluten triggers migraines, and this is something I hope to explore in future studies.

Typically, a food trigger will cause a migraine to start within 15 minutes of exposure to that substance.

If someone tests positive for celiac, or wheat allergy, then the answer is simple: remove gluten from the diet. So the question arises when someone tests negative should we still eliminate gluten?

What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

It is often worth a attempt, because there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

If someone does not own celiac disease but suffers from symptoms of gluten sensitivity, an elimination trial of gluten is often helpful for reducing migraine frequency or severity. The reason I suspect is that removing gluten will reduce chances of an inflammatory response that will activate the trigeminal nerves and trigger pain. Gluten elimination for migraines is still experimental.

We need to treat the whole person in medicine. This includes looking at potential triggers for headache and doing an elimination diet can be of benefit. There are so numerous gluten-free products currently on the market, it makes removing gluten from the diet easier.

This article has been changed to clarify the definition of celiac disease.

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Managing a wheat allergy — your own or someone else’s — includes strict avoidance of wheat ingredients in both food and nonfood products.

Wheat is one of eight allergens with specific labeling requirements under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) of 2004.

What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

Under that law, manufacturers of packaged food products sold in the U.S. and containing wheat as an ingredient must include the presence of wheat, in clear language, on the ingredient label.

The grain is found in a myriad of foods — cereals, pastas, crackers and even some boiling dogs, sauces and ice cream. It is also found in nonfood items such as Play-Doh, as well as in cosmetic and bath products. Note that the FALCPA labeling rules do not apply to nonfood items; if you own questions about ingredients in those products, check the manufacturer’s website or contact the company.

Foods that don’t contain wheat as an ingredient can be contaminated by wheat in the manufacturing process or during food preparation.

As a result, people with a wheat allergy should also avoid products that bear precautionary statements on the label, such as “made on shared equipment with wheat,” “packaged in a plant that also processes wheat” or similar language. The use of those advisory labels is voluntary, and not every manufacturers do so.

A challenging aspect of managing a wheat allergy is baking. While there’s no simple substitution for wheat as an ingredient, baked goods such as breads, muffins and cakes may be made using a combination of non-wheat flours, such as those made from rice, corn, sorghum, soy, tapioca or potato starch.

Your allergist can provide you with guidance on which grains are safe for you.

Options for wheat-free grocery shopping include foods made from other grains such as corn, rice, quinoa, oats, rye and barley.

The recent growth in gluten-free products is making it easier to manage a wheat allergy. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley and rye.

A gluten-free product may be safe for those who are allergic to wheat because the product should not contain wheat ingredients.

However, because a product marketed as “gluten-free” must also be free of rye and barley in addition to wheat, those who must avoid only wheat may be limiting themselves. Anyone managing a food allergy shouldn’t rely on a “free from” label as a substitute for thoroughly reading the finish ingredient label.

People with any helpful of food allergy must make some changes in the foods they eat. Allergists are specially trained to direct you to helpful resources, such as special cookbooks, patient support groups and registered dietitians, who can assist you plan your meals.

Managing a severe food reaction with epinephrine

A wheat allergy reaction can cause symptoms that range from mild to life-threatening; the severity of each reaction is unpredictable.

People who own previously experienced only mild symptoms may suddenly experience a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis.

What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

In the U.S., food allergy is the leading cause of anaphylaxis exterior the hospital setting.

Epinephrine (adrenaline) is the first-line treatment for anaphylaxis, which can happen within seconds or minutes, can worsen quickly and can be deadly. In this type of allergic reaction, exposure to the allergen causes the whole-body release of a flood of chemicals that can lead to lowered blood pressure and narrowed airways, among other serious symptoms.

Once you’re diagnosed with a food allergy, your allergist will likely prescribe an epinephrine auto-injector and teach you how to use it.

Check the expiration date of your auto-injector, note the expiration date on your calendar and enquire your pharmacy about reminder services for prescription renewals.

Be certain to own two doses available, as the severe reaction may recur. If you own had a history of severe reactions, take epinephrine as soon as you suspect you own eaten an allergy-causing food or if you feel a reaction starting. Epinephrine should be used immediately if you experience severe symptoms such as shortness of breath, repetitive coughing, feeble pulse, generalized hives, tightness in the throat, trouble breathing or swallowing, or a combination of symptoms from diverse body areas such as hives, rashes or swelling coupled with vomiting, diarrhea or abdominal pain.

What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

Repeated doses of epinephrine may be necessary.

If you are uncertain whether a reaction warrants epinephrine, use it correct away, because the benefits of epinephrine far outweigh the risk that a dose may not own been necessary.

Common side effects of epinephrine may include anxiety, restlessness, dizziness and shakiness. Rarely, the medication can lead to abnormal heart rate or rhythm, heart attack, a sharp increase in blood pressure, and fluid buildup in the lungs. Patients with certain pre-existing conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease, may be at higher risk for adverse effects and should speak to their allergist about using epinephrine.

Your allergist will provide you with a written emergency treatment plan that outlines which medications should be istered and when (note that between 10 and 20 percent of life-threatening severe allergic reactions own no skin symptoms).

Be certain that you understand how to properly and promptly use an epinephrine auto-injector.

Once epinephrine has been istered, immediately call 911 and inform the dispatcher that epinephrine was given and that more may be needed from the emergency responders.

Other medications, such as antihistamine and corticosteroids, may be prescribed to treat symptoms of a food allergy, but it is significant to note that there is no substitute for epinephrine — this is the only medication that can reverse the life-threatening symptoms of anaphylaxis.

Managing food allergies in children

Because fatal and near-fatal wheat allergy reactions, love other food allergy symptoms, can develop when a kid is not with his or her family, parents need to make certain that their child’s school, day care or other program has a written emergency action plan with instructions on preventing, recognizing and managing these episodes in class and during activities such as sporting events and field trips.

A nonprofit group, Food Allergy Research & Education, has a list of resources for schools, parents and students in managing food allergies.

If your kid has been prescribed an auto-injector, be certain that you and those responsible for supervising your kid understand how to use it.

Is eating bread giving you bloating and other digestive symptoms? If so, you could be sensitive to wheat. Cutting out bread or changing the type you eat may help.

More and more of us claim to suffer from a wheat allergy, so we shun bread and other wheat-based foods, love pasta and cereals.

Experts tell genuine food allergy is, in fact, rarely to blame.

But wheat sensitivity (also known as wheat intolerance) or simply trouble digesting wheat is increasingly common.


What to do if wheat triggers digestive symptoms

If your symptoms are severe and long-lasting, especially if you own blood in your poo (stools), vomiting or painful stomach cramps, see your doctor to law out a medical condition.

If you own bloating or other minor symptoms after eating bread, Dr Skypala recommends trying an elimination diet.

This is where you completely cut out wheat from your diet for 4 weeks, then gradually bring it back in to see if symptoms reappear.

«When you bring wheat-based foods back in, I recommend trying Weetabix or pasta first for a few days before starting on bread. It’s better to start with wheat in a more pure form, as bread has so numerous other ingredients,» Dr Skypala says.


The health problems caused by wheat

There are 3 key health problems caused by wheat:

  1. Coeliac disease – a condition where the intestine lining can’t absorb and is damaged by gluten-containing foods including wheat, barley, oats and rye.

    See your GP for a blood test.

  2. Wheat allergy – reactions generally start within minutes and include itching, sneezing and wheezing. See your GP for referral to an NHS allergy clinic.
  3. Wheat sensitivity – symptoms love bloating, cramps, diarrhoea and sickness come on fairly slowly, generally hours after eating wheat. There’s no diagnostic test.


Step by step, how gluten leads to migraines

But just looking at a gluten-intolerant person’s inflammatory response doesn’t provide the whole picture on gluten’s link to migraine.

In recent years scientists own gained a better understanding of how and why migraines happen.

Migraine is now considered a genetic condition that is found commonly within families.

Early theories suggested migraines occurred because of enlargement or dilation of the blood vessels. But now neurologists realize this isn’t the whole tale.

What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

We now know the cascade that leads to a migraine involves the nerves in the trigeminovascular pathway (TVP) – the collection of nerves that control sensation in the face as well as biting and chewing.

When TVP is activated by the presence of gluten, for example, it causes the release of numerous chemicals including histamine, a substance that immune cells produce when responding to injury, allergic and inflammatory events.

The TVP nerves also produce a recently discovered trigger for migraines; a protein called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

When CGRP is released it causes the dilation of blood vessels in the meninges – the layer of tissue protecting the brain. As the blood vessels dilate they leak water and proteins into the meninges which causes swelling and irritation. The swelling activates the trigenimial nerves which relay messages to other regions of the brain, including the thalamus which creates the perception of pain that is associated with a migraine.

Within the past year a new class of medications has gained FDA approval for migraine prevention.

These medications are called CGRP monoclonal antibodies and own proven to be an effective preventative treatment. They stop the protein CGRP from getting into its receptor.


Celiac disease vs. gluten sensitivity

When someone suffers from celiac disease – a digestive disorder caused by an autoimmune response to gluten – there is a clear link between migraine headaches and gluten. Gluten triggers immune cells to release antibodies to attack substances the body sees as foreign.

When someone without celiac disease eats gluten, it goes into the gastrointestinal tract where food is broken below and the nutrients are absorbed.

In the case of celiac disease, that person’s immune system sees the gluten as a foreign substance (like a virus or bacteria that shouldn’t be there) and attacks it with a specific antibody – called transglutaminase (TG) 2 serum autoantibodies – to destroy the gluten.

The problem is the person’s own healthy tissues gets destroyed in the process. In other words, when people who are sensitive to gluten consume it, the immune system sees this protein as an invader and creates antibodies to capture and destroy the protein.

If the protein is sitting in the GI tract or has been absorbed by other organs, the antibodies go looking for it and attack whatever tissue is harboring the gluten protein.

This triggers an inflammatory reaction that puts the body in high alert that injures various healthy organs.

What r the symptoms of a wheat allergy

Organs then release molecules that cause blood vessels to become leaky and release water, electrolytes and protein into the tissues and cause swelling.

This is an inflammatory response that affects the whole body, not just the brain. In addition to headaches, it can cause broader symptoms including gastrointestinal problems, fatigue and learning difficulties, just to name a few.


Is it wheat intolerance or sensitivity?

If your symptoms return, it confirms you’re sensitive to wheat and will also show you which foods are especially troublesome. Some people may only own problems with pasta, for example, while others are fine until they eat bread.

If you are sensitive to wheat, or you own trouble digesting it, the main way to relieve your symptoms is to embark on a wheat-free or partially wheat-free diet.


Bread-related gut symptoms

«Probably a third of patients in my allergy clinic complain of digestive symptoms such as bloating, diarrhoea, vomiting and stomach pain after eating bread,» says Isabel Skypala PhD, specialist allergy dietitian at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust.

She says allergy is unlikely to be the culprit, but bread-related symptoms are genuine, and wheat could be to blame.

«Some people discover certain foods are simply hard to digest, and wheat appears to be one of those,» she explains.

Read more about food intolerance.


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