What is the symptoms of nut allergies

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  2. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  3. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  4. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  5. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  6. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something.

They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

Colonization with the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was significantly and independently associated with food allergy in young children with eczema enrolled in a pivotal peanut allergy prevention study.

S.aureus is a marker for severe eczema, and early eczema is a widely recognized risk factor for developing food allergies in young children.

But the findings from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study cohort show that even after controlling for eczema severity, skin S.

aureus positivity was associated with an increased risk for developing allergies to peanuts, eggs, and cow’s milk.

S. aureus colonization was also associated with persistent egg allergy until at least age 5 or 6 years in the LEAP cohort analysis in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The lead researcher, Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, of Kings College London, said in a press statement that the findings could assist explain why young children with eczema own a extremely high risk for developing food allergies. While the exact mechanisms linking the two are not known, «our results propose that the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus could be an significant factor contributing to this outcome,» she said.

The findings also propose that S.

aureus colonization may inhibit peanut tolerance among at-risk infants when peanuts are introduced extremely early in life.

Among the nine participants in the peanut-consumption arm of the study (i.e., no peanut allergy at baseline) who had confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, every but one were colonized with S. aureus at one or more LEAP study visits.

«The fact that S. aureus was associated with greater risk of peanut allergy among peanut consumers but not peanut avoiders further suggests that peanut consumption was less effective in the prevention of peanut allergy among participants with S.

aureus compared with those with no S. aureus,» the researchers wrote.

The LEAP study enrolled infants ages 4-11 months with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both. The babies were randomized to therapeutic peanut consumption or peanut avoidance, and every had eczema clinical evaluation and culture of skin and nasal swabs at baseline.

The follow-up LEAP-On study assessed the children at age 72 months, after 12 months of peanut avoidance in both groups.

Skin and nasal swabs were obtained at baseline and at age 12, 30, and 60 months. A entire of 48.8% of the participants had some form of S. aureus colonization (32.2% skin and 32.3% nasal) on at least one LEAP study visit, with most having just one positive test result.

What is the symptoms of nut allergies

The greatest rates of colonization were recorded at 4-11 months of age.

S. aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity, along with hen’s egg white and peanut specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E production at any LEAP visit. But even after controlling for eczema severity, hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE levels at each LEAP and LEAP-On visit were significantly associated with skin S. aureus positivity, the team noted.

«This relationship was even stronger when we looked into high-level hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE production,» the researchers wrote.

«Similar findings were noted for cow’s milk, where high-level sIgE production to milk at 30, 60, and 72 months of age was related to any skin S. aureus colonization. Together, these data propose that S. aureus is associated with hen’s egg, peanut, and cow’s milk allergy.»

In the LEAP study, extremely early peanut consumption was found to reduce the risk of peanut allergy at 60 months in infants at high risk for developing the allergy, but infants in the consumption arm of the study with S.

aureus colonization were approximately seven and four times more likely to own confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, the team said.

Study strengths, Tsilochristou and co-authors noted, included the rigorous design; a limitation was the reliance on bacteriological culture to identify S. aureus colonization rather than using DNA-based testing.

«S. aureus has been implicated in the development and severity of atopic diseases, namely eczema, allergic rhinitis, and asthma; our findings extend these observations to the development of food allergy independent of eczema severity,» the investigators concluded.

«The role of S.

aureus as a potential environmental factor should be considered in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants. Further prospective longitudinal studies measuring S. aureus with more advanced techniques and interventional studies eradicating S. aureus in early infancy will assist elucidate its role in the development of eczema or food allergy,» the team wrote.

Tree Nut Allergy

Tree nut allergy is the second most common allergy in infants and young children.

Approximately 0.4- 0.5% of American children own a tree nut allergy. Tree nuts are a common allergen reported to cause fatal and near-fatal allergic reactions.

Tree nut allergy is generally life-long once acquired. Approximately 9% of children allergic to tree nuts may outgrow their allergy.

Children with a tree nut allergy must avoid that tree nut and every products containing that type of tree nut. Children with a tree nut allergy also must avoid anything containing traces of ingredients containing that tree nut. There is a potential of tree nut products having cross-contact other tree nuts and with peanuts.

For this reason, your child’s doctor may advise you to avoid every tree nuts and peanuts.

*Coconut

The FDA lists coconut as a tree nut. In fact, coconut is a seed of a drupaceous fruit. Most people allergic to tree nuts can safely eat coconut. Coconut allergy is reasonably rare. If you are allergic to tree nuts, talk to your allergist before adding coconut to or eliminating coconut from your diet.

Cross Reactivity: Do You Need to Avoid Other Foods?

Cross-reactivity occurs when the proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another.

When that happens, the body’s immune system sees them as the same.

Tree nuts are in a diverse plant family than peanuts. Peanuts are legumes and are not related to tree nuts (almonds, walnuts, cashews, etc.). However, about 35% of peanut-allergic toddlers in the U.S. own or will develop a tree nut allergy. Doctors often recommend that young children avoid tree nuts if they are allergic to peanuts. This is because it is fairly common to be «co-allergic» to tree nuts if a kid is allergic to peanuts.

There is a high degree of cross-reactivity between cashew and pistachio and between walnut and pecan. Most people who are allergic to one tree nut are not allergic to every tree nuts.

But some doctors will advise their patients to avoid every tree nuts if allergic to one or more tree nuts. Check with your doctor to discover out if you need to avoid every tree nuts.

Nutrition for a Nut-Free Diet

Tree nuts are a excellent source of protein, vitamins and minerals in a child’s diet. However, if your kid needs to avoid nuts of any type, they should not be at nutritional risk since there are numerous other sources of protein to eat instead.

NUTRIENTS LOST
WHEN AVOIDING TREE NUTS
SUGGESTED ALTERNATE SOURCES
(if not allergic)
Protein, Vitamins, Minerals Increase other protein foods such as meat, legumes,  fish, poultry, eggs, dairy
(if safe for your child);
fruit, vegetables, and enriched grains

Tree Nut Substitutions

It is extremely simple to replace nuts in a recipe.

There are numerous seeds and seed products available including sunflower butter and pumpkin seed butter. Roasted chickpeas can replace nut snacks. Pretzels can substitute for pecans in pecan pie.

Learn more about  NUT SUBSTITUTES.

How to Read a Label for Tree Nuts

Always read the entire ingredient label to glance for the names of the tree nut(s) you need to avoid. Tree nut ingredients may be within the list of the ingredients. Or tree nuts could be listed in a “Contains” statement beneath the list of ingredients.

Examples are «Contains Walnut» or «Contains Almond». This is required by the federal Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). Study more about the U.S. food allergen labeling law.

FALCPA requires that every packaged foods regulated by the FDA must list the common names of tree nuts clearly on the ingredient label if it contains tree nuts. Advisory statements such as “may contain hazelnuts” or “made in a facility with tree nuts” are voluntary.

Advisory statements are not required by any federal labeling law. Discuss with your doctor if you may eat products with these labels or if you should avoid them.

Did you know that marzipan, mortadella and  mandelonas every contain tree nuts? The FDA food allergen label law requires foods to state if they contain a top 8 allergen such as tree nuts. But, there are numerous foods and products that are not covered by the law, so it is still significant to know how to read a label for tree nut ingredients. Products exempt from plain English labeling rules: (1) Foods that are not regulated by the FDA. (2) Cosmetics and personal care items.

(3) Prescription and over-the-counter medications. (4) Toys, crafts and pet food.

CONTAIN TREE NUTS

The following ingredients found on a label indicate the presence of tree nuts. Every labels should be read carefully before consuming a product, even if it has been used safely in the past.

COMMON TREE NUT NAMES (FDA LIST)

Almond
Beechnut
Brazil nut
Bush nut
Butternut
Cashew
Chestnut
Coconut*
Filbert
Ginko nut
Hazelnut
Hickory nut
Lichee nut
Macadamia nut
Nangai nut
Pecan
Pine nut
Pistachio
Shea nut
Walnut

COMPLETE LIST OF TREE NUT NAMES (BOTANICAL NAMES AND DERIVATIVES)

Almond
Almond paste
Anacardium nuts
Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae) [botanical name, Cashew]
Artificial nuts
Beech nut
Brazil nut
Bertholletia excelsa (Lecythidaceae) [botanical name, Brazil nut]
Bush nut
Butternut
Butyrospermum Parkii [botanical name, Shea nut]
Canarium ovatum Engl.

in A. DC. (Burseraceae) [botanical name, Pili nut]
Caponata
Carya illinoensis (Juglandaceae) [botanical name, Pecan]
Carya spp. (Juglandaceae) [botanical name, Hickory nut]
Cashew
Castanea pumila (Fagaceae) [botanical name, Chinquapin]
Castanea spp. (Fagaceae) [botanical name, Chestnut (Chinese, American, European, Seguin)]
Chestnut (Chinese, American, European, Seguin)
Chinquapin
Coconut*
Cocos nucifera L. (Arecaceae (alt. Palmae)) [botanical name, Coconut]
Corylus spp. (Betulaceae) [botanical name, Filbert/hazelnut]
Filbert
Fagus spp. (Fagaceae) [botanical name, beech nut]
Gianduja
Ginko nut
Ginkgo biloba L.

(Ginkgoaceae) [botanical name, Ginko nut]
Hazelnut
Heartnut
Hickory nut
Indian nut
Juglans cinerea (Juglandaceae) [botanical name, Butternut]
Juglans spp. (Juglandaceae) [botanical name, Walnut, Butternut, Heartnut]
Karite (shea nut)
Lichee nut
Litchi chinensis Sonn. Sapindaceae [botanical name, Lichee nut]
Lychee nut
Macadamia nut
Macadamia spp. (Proteaceae) [botanical name, Macadamia nut/Bush nut]
Mandelonas
Marzipan
Mashuga nuts
Nangai nuts
Natural nut extract (for example, almond extract)
Nougat
Nu-Nuts®
Nut butters (e.g., Almond butter, Hazelnut butter, Brazil nut butter, Macadamia nut butter, Pistachio nut butter, Shea nut butter, Karike butter, as well as other nut butters)
Nut meal
Nutella ®
Nutmeat
Nut oil (e.g., Walnut oil as well as other nut oils)
Nut paste
Nut pieces
Pecan
Pigñolia
Pili nut
Pine nut
Pine nut (Indian, piñon, pinyon, pigndi, pigñolia, pignon nuts)
Pinon nut
Piñon or Piñon nut
Pinus spp.

(Pineaceae) [botanical name, Pine nut/piñon nut]
Pistachio
Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) [botanical name, Pistachio]
Pralines
Prunus dulcis (Rosaceae) [bontanical name, almond]
Shea nut
Sheanut
Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn. (Sapotaceae) [botanical name, Shea nut]
Walnut (English, Persian, Black, Japanese, California)

TREE NUTS ARE SOMETIMES FOUND IN

Artificial flavoring
Baked goods
Mortadella
Natural flavoring
Nougat
Pesto

However, if the product is an FDA regulated food, the common tree nut name must appear on the label.

Nut-Free Recipes

Over 1100 nut-free recipes are available in KFA’s Safe Eats™ Recipes.

Search for Nut-Free Recipes

Medical review February 2015.

When spring allergy season first starts, causing you to sniffle and sneeze, tree pollen is to blame. Trees start producing pollen as early as January in the Southern U.S.

What is the symptoms of nut allergies

Numerous trees hold producing pollen through June.


What Trees Cause the Most Symptoms?

Some tree pollen causes more problems than others. Some of the trees that cause the most symptoms are:

  1. Oak
  2. Aspen
  3. Mulberry
  4. Poplar
  5. Mountain elder
  6. Pecan
  7. Cedar
  8. Hickory
  9. Birch
  10. Box elder
  11. Olive
  12. Alder
  13. Ash
  14. Elm
  15. Beech
  16. Cottonwood
  17. Willow

Being allergic to some trees could cause you to react to certain foods.

It happens because the tree pollen is similar to the protein in some fruits, vegetables and nuts.1Your immune system gets confused and can’t tell the difference between the two. Eating these foods may cause your mouth or face to itch or swell. These foods may include apples, cherries, pears and more. This is called oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Birch and alder trees cause the most OAS food reactions.

In some cases, your tree pollen allergy may cross-react with some nuts, love peanuts or almonds. If you own mouth itching or swelling while eating nuts, you could own a more serious, life-threatening reaction calledanaphylaxis, which is common with nut allergies. If this happens to you, call your doctor correct away.


What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription.

Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled. These medicines include:

  1. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  2. Antihistamines
  3. Nasal corticosteroids
  4. Decongestants
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy. This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  2. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies.

    Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.

  3. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  4. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  5. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  6. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen.

    For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.

  7. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring. But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary 2018.

References
1.

Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.). Retrieved February 26, 2018, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditio…ergies-can-be-relate

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Nut Allergy?

When someone with a peanut or tree nut allergy has something with nuts in it, the body releases chemicals love histamine (pronounced: HISS-tuh-meen).

This can cause symptoms such as:

  1. hives
  2. trouble breathing
  3. swelling
  4. dizziness or fainting
  5. diarrhea
  6. a drop in blood pressure
  7. throat tightness
  8. vomiting
  9. sneezing
  10. hoarseness
  11. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  12. wheezing
  13. coughing
  14. stomachache
  15. anxiety or a feeling something bad is happening

Reactions to foods, love peanuts and tree nuts, can be diverse.

What is the symptoms of nut allergies

It every depends on the person — and sometimes the same person can react differently at diverse times.

In the most serious cases, a nut or peanut allergy can cause anaphylaxis (say: an-uh-fuh-LAK-sis). Anaphylaxis is a sudden, life-threatening allergic reaction. A person’s blood pressure can drop, breathing tubes can narrow, and the tongue can swell.

People at risk for this helpful of a reaction own to be extremely careful and need a plan for handling emergencies, when they might need to use special medicine to stop these symptoms from getting worse.

What Will the Doctor Do?

If your doctor thinks you might own a nut or peanut allergy, he or she will probably send you to see a doctor who specializes in allergies.

The (allergy specialist) will enquire you about past reactions and how endless it takes between eating the nut or peanut and getting the symptoms, such as hives.

The allergist may also enquire whether anyone else in your family has allergies or other allergy conditions, such as eczema or asthma. Researchers aren’t certain why some people own food allergies and others don’t, but they sometimes run in families.

The allergist may also desire to do a skin test. This is a way of seeing how your body reacts to a extremely little quantity of the nut that is giving you trouble.

The allergist will use a liquid extract of the nut that seems to be causing you symptoms.

During skin testing, a little scratch on your skin is made (it will be a quick pinch, but there are no needles!). That’s how just a little of the liquid nut gets into your skin. If you get a reddish, itchy, raised spot, it shows that you may be allergic to that food or substance.

Skin tests are the best test for food allergies, but if more information is needed, the doctor may also order a blood test.

At the lab, the blood will be mixed with some of the food or substance you may be allergic to and checked for antibodies.

It’s significant to remember that even though the doctor tests for food allergies by carefully exposing you to a extremely little quantity of the food, you should not attempt this at home! The only put for an allergy test is at the allergist’s office, where they are specially trained and could give you medicine correct away if you had a reaction.

How Is a Tree Nut or Peanut Allergy Treated?

There is no special medicine for nut or peanut allergies and numerous people don’t outgrow them.

The best treatment is to avoid the nut. That means not eating that nut, and also avoiding the nut when it’s mixed in foods. (Sometimes these foods don’t even taste nutty! Would you believe chili sometimes contains nuts to assist make it thicker?)

Staying safe means reading food labels and paying attention to what they tell about how the food was produced. Some foods don’t contain nuts, but are made in factories that make other items that do contain nuts. The problem is the equipment can be used for both foods, causing "cross-contamination." That’s the same thing that happens in your own home if someone spreads peanut butter on a sandwich and dips that same knife into the jar of jelly.

After checking the ingredients list, glance on the label for phrases love these:

  1. "may contain tree nuts"
  2. "produced on shared equipment with tree nuts or peanuts"

People who are allergic to nuts also should avoid foods with these statements on the label.

Some of the highest-risk foods for people with peanut or tree nut allergy include:

  1. Asian and African foods
  2. cookies and baked goods
  3. ice cream
  4. candy
  5. sauces (nuts may be used to thicken dishes)

Talk to your allergist about how to stay safe in the school cafeteria. Also enquire about how you should handle other peanut encounters, love at restaurants or stadiums where people are opening peanut shells. People with nut allergies generally won’t own a reaction if they breathe in little particles. That’s because the food generally has to be eaten to cause a reaction.

What Happens With a Tree Nut or Peanut Allergy?

Your immune system normally fights infections.

But when someone has a nut allergy, it overreacts to proteins in the nut. If the person eats something that contains the nut, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and responds by working extremely hard to fight off the invader. This causes an allergic reaction.

Have an Emergency Plan

If you own a nut or peanut allergy, you and a parent should create a plan for how to handle a reaction, just in case. That way your teachers, the school nurse, your basketball coach, your friends — everyone will know what a reaction looks love and how to respond.

To immediately treat anaphylaxis, doctors recommend that people with a nut or peanut allergy hold a shot of epinephrine (say: eh-puh-NEH-frin) with them.

This helpful of epinephrine injection comes in an easy-to-carry container. You and your parent can work out whether you carry this or someone at school keeps it on hand for you. You’ll also need to identify a person who will give you the shot.

You might desire to own antihistamine medicine on hand too for mild reactions. If anaphylaxis is happening, this medicine is never a substitute for epinephrine. After getting an epinephrine shot, you need to go to the hospital or other medical facility, where they will hold an eye on you for at least 4 hours and make certain the reaction is under control and does not come back.

What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription.

Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled.

What is the symptoms of nut allergies

These medicines include:

  1. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  2. Antihistamines
  3. Nasal corticosteroids
  4. Decongestants
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy. This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  2. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies.

    Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.

  3. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  4. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  5. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  6. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen. For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.
  7. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring.

But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary 2018.

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.).

What is the symptoms of nut allergies

Retrieved February 26, 2018, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditio…ergies-can-be-relate

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

JOIN NOW

en españolAlergia a los frutos secos y a los cacahuetes

Oh, nuts!

They certain can cause you trouble if you’re allergic to them — and a growing number of kids are these days.

So what helpful of nuts are we talking about? Peanuts, for one, though they aren’t truly a nut. They’re a legume (say: LEH-gyoom), love peas and lentils. A person also could be allergic to nuts that grow on trees, such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, cashews, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, and pistachios.

When you ponder of allergies, you might picture lots of sneezing and runny noses. But unlike an allergy to spring flowers, a nut or peanut allergy can cause difficulty breathing and other extremely serious health problems.

What is the symptoms of nut allergies

That’s why it’s very important for someone with a nut or peanut allergy to avoid eating nuts and peanuts, which can be tough because they’re in lots of foods.

What Else Should I Know?

If you discover out you own a nut or peanut allergy, don’t be bashful about it. It’s significant to tell your friends, family, coaches, and teachers at school. The more people who know, the better off you are because they can assist you stay away from the nut that causes you problems.

Telling the server in a restaurant is also really significant because he or she can steer you away from dishes that contain nuts.

Likewise, a coach or teacher would be capable to select snacks for the group that don’t contain nuts.

It’s grand to own people love your parents, who can assist you avoid nuts, but you’ll also desire to start learning how to avoid them on your own.


What Are the Symptoms of a Tree Pollen Allergy?

Pollen allergysymptoms are commonly called “hay fever.” Pollen released by trees, as well as grasses and weeds, cause these symptoms. They include:

  1. Stuffy nose (nasal congestion)
  2. Runny nose and mucus production
  3. Red and watery eyes
  4. Itchy nose, eyes, ears and mouth
  5. Sneezing
  6. Swelling around the eyes

If you haveallergic asthmaand are allergic to tree pollen, you might also own asthma symptoms while the trees are pollinating.

Tree pollen is finer than other pollens.

Because of this, the wind can carry it for miles. These light, dry grains easily discover their way to your sinuses, lungs and eyes, making them hard to avoid.


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