What is the cause of latex allergies

What is the cause of latex allergies

What is a Food Allergy? There Are Diverse Types of Allergic Reactions to Foods


If your kid has symptoms after eating certain foods, he or she may own a food allergy.

A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a certain food as harmful and reacts by causing symptoms. This is an allergic reaction. Foods that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat. The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain.

Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen
  2. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  5. Skin rash, itching, hives
  6. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies.

    These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.

  7. Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food. This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody. Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick.

Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods.

For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods.

Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting.

Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Two Categories of Food Allergies

  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.
  • Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food. This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody. Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract.

Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed.

What is the cause of latex allergies

In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity.

What is the cause of latex allergies

Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach.

An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition.

What is the cause of latex allergies

Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away.

Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk. This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools.

Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness.

What is the cause of latex allergies

When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December 2014.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed.

In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy.

Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat.

The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height.

Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December 2014.


What should I do if someone near me has an allergic reactions?

Your actions should depend on the severity of the reaction.

Contact emergency services if the person shows any of the following symptoms:

  1. Tightness in the throat or feeling constriction in the airways
  2. Trouble breathing or wheezing
  3. Loss of consciousness
  4. Swollen lips, tongue, or throat
  5. Any symptoms of anaphylaxis
  6. Nausea or vomiting

For more mild symptoms, a variety of over the counter (OTC) treatments are available including antihistamines for watery eyes or hives, decongestants for stuffy noses, OTC allergy eye drops for itchy watery eyes, and freezing compresses or hydrocortisone creams for rashes.

A doctor should always be contacted following a new reaction so the person can be tested and treated.

This is an exciting question.

Bananas own little amounts of a protein called Chitinase (Chitinase — Wikipedia). Allergies are almost always from proteins, so Chitinase is probably the culprit. How would you know? Well other sources of Chitinase are kiwi and avocado, so if someone has a problem with bananas, they might own a problem with kiwi/avocado too. Also, for whatever reason, latex.

If someone has a reaction to bananas but “NOT” latex and/or NOT kiwi/avocado, what else?

Well there is fructose. I made a video talking about fructose malabsorption on my YouTube channel DorkSideCookies, but the short of it is that some people lack the ability to process fructose and/or lack the ability to process large amounts of fructose.

That wouldn’t be a problem per se, but sending unprocessed sugar directly into the intestines is a excellent way to create a gut flora bloom that can cause the obvious problems love bloating and gas, but can also cause less obvious problems love blocking serotonin production which can cause depression, moodiness, and other mental-related issues.

Personally while I can handle a banana a day (and I do), too numerous strawberries make me ill, so I would discover it unlikely to blame bananas for fructose malabsorption-related issues, but everyone might be diverse.

A excellent test to determine possible fructose problems is whether a person can handle chicory root (also known as inulin).

You’ll discover chicory root/inulin laced products in the breakfast aisle labeled generally as “high fiber” or “extra fiber”. Anything with chicory root/inulin will give me a “bad day” within about 3–4 hours of eating it.

There are a variety of other chemicals in bananas obviously, and its theoretically possible to own an allergy (more likely a food intolerance) to those other chemicals, but I’d focus on chitinase first, then fructose second.

Good luck!

Latex, the sap of the Hevea brasiliensis tree, has been used in the manufacture of medical equipment since 1888 when the first surgical rubber gloves were manufactured.

The possibility of severe latex (natural rubber) allergy in individuals with spina bifida was first raised in 1989.

What is the cause of latex allergies

Since that time research studies own shown that between 18 and 73% of children and adolescents with spina bifida are sensitive to latex as measured by history or blood test. The type of allergic reaction experienced can range from watery and itchy eyes and/or sneezing and coughing, to hives (a blotchy, raised, itchy, rash) to swelling of the trachea (windpipe) and even to life-threatening changes in blood pressure and circulation (anaphylactic shock).

Although the cause of rubber allergy in individuals with spina bifida is not known, it is theorized that sensitization may happen from the early, intense, and constant exposure to rubber products through multiple surgeries, diagnostic tests and examinations, also from bladder and bowel programs.

Exposure to latex can happen when products containing rubber come in contact with a person’s skin or mucous membranes such as the mouth, eyes, genitals, bladder or rectum.

Serious reactions can also happen when latex enters the bloodstream. Some cases of severe reaction following injection of medication through latex stoppers, IV ports or syringes own been reported. In addition, the powder from balloons or gloves can absorb particles and become airborne causing reactions when breathed by a latex sensitive person. Food that has been handled by latex gloves may also cause a reaction, and people who own allergic reactions to latex may also be allergic to certain foods, including bananas, chestnuts, avocados and kiwi fruit.

Although a lot has been learned about rubber allergy in the final few years, the problem is really just beginning to be studied and understood.

Interestingly, health care workers such as nurses, doctors, and dentists, individuals born with severe bladder abnormalities, and some people who own had multiple surgical procedures are also at increased risk for rubber allergy although their risk is much lower than it is for individuals with spina bifida.

The Food and Drug istration and the Centers for Disease Control are investigating the problem of rubber allergy and current efforts are aimed at finding the component(s) of latex responsible for causing this allergy, developing methods of producing “safe”, non allergy causing rubber, and labeling products indicating natural rubber (latex) content.

Since the tale of rubber allergy is just beginning, and, without a doubt new understanding will emerge over the next several years, recommendations made now may need to be revised.

Because of the life-threatening nature of this allergy a list of current recommendations is included. Individuals with spina bifida and their families are urged to consider the following recommendations and to discuss them with members of their health care team.

All individuals with spina bifida should be considered at high risk for having an allergic reaction to rubber and should avoid contact with rubber products, particularly during medical or surgical procedures. Only non-latex gloves and catheters should be used. Alternative products, generally made of silicone, plastic or vinyl, can be safely substituted.
Individuals who own experienced allergic reactions during surgical or medical procedures should consider wearing a medic-alert bracelet or necklace, carrying auto-injectable epinephrine and sterile non-latex gloves for emergency use, and discussing latex allergy with every health care and community providers including school, day care and camp.

In addition, consultation with an allergist familiar with the problem is recommended to fully assess the risks and the possible need for preoperative treatment with special medications to suppress the potential for severe allergic reaction. Avoidance of every latex-containing items, especially in the operating room, is strongly recommended.
The following commonly encountered items may contain latex and pose a risk to the latex sensitive individual: Healthcare items which may contain latex: gloves, catheters, tourniquets, elastic bandages, ace wraps, I.V. tubing injection ports, medication vials, adhesive tape, bandaids.

Home/community items which may contain latex: balloons, pacifiers, dental dams, rubber bands, elastic in clothing, beach toys, Koosh balls, baby bottle nipples, condoms, diaphragms, diapers, art supplies.

Please note that this is only a partial list and it is strongly recommended that individuals with spina bifida and their families enquire about the composition of products used in their care.

A more finish list is available upon request from the Spina Bifida Association of America.

Catherine Shaer, M.D.,
Director Spina Bifida Program
Children’s National Medical Middle, Washington, DC

Elli Meeropol, R.N., M.S.
Clinical Nurse Specialist
Shriners Hospital
Springfield, MA

This information was provided by the Spina Bifida Association of America. You can access their web site for more information by clicking the link below.

Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient’s medical history.

Persons with Spina Bifida are urged to discuss their specific symptoms and situations with their personal physician.


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What are allergies?

An allergy is the body’s hypersensitive immune response to a substance called an allergen.

Most allergens are harmless to the majority of people. They can be found in the air (pollen), foods and beverages (nuts or lactose) or in insects or animals (dust mites or pet dander).

What is the cause of latex allergies

If a person has an allergy to a substance, their body reacts to that substance as if it was a pathogen and tries to fight it off and destroy it. The most common helpful of allergy in the United States is hay fever, although, food allergies are becoming much more common. An acute reaction to an allergen results in anaphylaxis, or anaphylactic shock, a life threatening condition which requires immediate emergency care.


What kinds of allergies are there?

A wide variety of substances provoke allergic reactions in people. Allergens can range from naturally occurring substances including pet dander, mold, insect venom and pollen to manufactured or synthetic materials love drugs or latex.

Allergic reactions can affect the skin, sinuses, or eyes and can range in severity from mild discomfort to anaphylaxis. Hay Fever is one of the most common forms of allergy affecting North Americans. Symptoms can affect the eyes and sinuses and it typically occurs in the spring, as plants start to release their pollen. Allergens can also cause diverse reactions from person to person. For example, pet dander may cause one person to break out in a rash or hives and another to sneeze and own itchy, watery eyes.

If anyone thinks he or she has an allergy, it is in their best interest to seek medical advice for testing and treatment.

What is the cause of latex allergies

Allergic reactions can change and become more advanced without warning. It is best to be prepared and manage the allergy before that happens.


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