What is the best allergy medicine to take if you have high blood pressure

Treating high blood pressure will assist prevent problems such as heart disease, stroke, loss of eyesight, chronic kidney disease, and other blood vessel diseases.

You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes are not enough to bring your blood pressure to the target level.

What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED

Most of the time, your health care provider will attempt lifestyle changes first and check your BP two or more times.

If your blood pressure is 120/80 to 129/80 mm Hg, you own elevated blood pressure.

  1. Your provider will recommend lifestyle changes to bring your blood pressure below to a normal range.
  2. Medicines are rarely used at this stage.

If your blood pressure is equal to or higher than 130/80 but lower than 140/90 mm Hg, you own Stage 1 high blood pressure.

When thinking about the best treatment, you and your provider must consider:

  1. If you own no other diseases or risk factors, your provider may recommend lifestyle changes and repeat the measurements after a few months.
  2. If your blood pressure remains equal to or higher than 130/80 but lower than 140/90 mm Hg, your provider may recommend medicines to treat high blood pressure.
  3. If you own other diseases or risk factors, your provider may be more likely to recommend medicines at the same time as lifestyle changes.

If your blood pressure is equal to or higher than 140/90 mm Hg, you own Stage 2 high blood pressure.

Your provider will most likely recommend that you take medicines and recommend lifestyle changes.

Before making a final diagnosis of either elevated blood pressure or high blood pressure, your provider should enquire you to own your blood pressure measured at home, at your pharmacy, or somewhere else besides their office or a hospital.

If you own a higher risk for heart disease, diabetes, heart problems, or a history of a stroke, medicines may be started at lower blood pressure reading. The most commonly used blood pressure targets for people with these medical problems are under 130/80.

MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Most of the time, only a single drug will be used at first.

Two drugs may be started if you own stage 2 high blood pressure.

Several types of medicine are used to treat high blood pressure. Your provider will decide which type of medicine is correct for you. You may need to take more than one type.

Each type of blood pressure medicine listed under comes in diverse brand and generic names.

One or more of these blood pressure medicines are often used to treat high blood pressure:

  1. Diuretics are also called water pills. They assist your kidneys remove some salt (sodium) from your body. As a result, your blood vessels do not own to hold as much fluid and your blood pressure goes down.
  2. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) work in about the same way as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.
  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) relax your blood vessels, which lowers your blood pressure.
  4. Beta-blockers make the heart beat at a slower rate and with less force.
  5. Calcium channel blockers relax blood vessels by reducing calcium entering cells.

Blood pressure medicines that are not used as often include:

  1. Alpha-blockers assist relax your blood vessels, which lowers your blood pressure.
  2. Vasodilators signal the muscles in the walls of blood vessels to relax.
  3. Centrally acting drugs signal your brain and nervous system to relax your blood vessels.
  4. Renin inhibitors, a newer type of medicine for treating high blood pressure, act by reducing the quantity of angiotensin precursors thereby relaxing your blood vessels.

    What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

SIDE EFFECTS OF BLOOD PRESSURE MEDICINES

Most blood pressure medicines are simple to take, but every medicines own side effects. Most of these are mild and may go away over time.

Some common side effects of high blood pressure medicines include:

  1. Dizziness or lightheadedness
  2. Nausea or vomiting
  3. Skin rash
  4. Feeling nervous
  5. Erection problems
  6. Headache
  7. Diarrhea or constipation
  8. Cough
  9. Feeling tired, feeble, drowsy, or a lack of energy
  10. Weight loss or acquire without trying

Tell your provider as soon as possible if you own side effects or the side effects are causing you problems.

Most of the time, making changes to the dose of medicine or when you take it can assist reduce side effects.

Never change the dose or stop taking a medicine on your own. Always talk to your provider first.

OTHER TIPS

Taking more than one medicine may change how your body absorbs or uses a drug. Vitamins or supplements, diverse foods, or alcohol may also change how a drug acts in your body.

Always enquire your provider whether you need to avoid any foods, drinks, vitamins or supplements, or any other medicines while you are taking blood pressure medicine.

Victor RG.

Arterial hypertension. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed.

What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 67.

Victor RG, Libby P. Systemic hypertension: management. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2019:chap 46.

Whelton PK, Carey RM, Aronow WS, et al. 2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and management of high blood pressure in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018;71(19):e127-e248. PMID: 29146535 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29146535.

Williams B, Borkum M. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertension. In: Feehally J, Floege J, Tonelli M, Johnson RJ, eds. Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 36.

Updated by: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.

Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Cold medicines are not off-limits if you own heart disease, but patients with high blood pressure, or hypertension, should check the label carefully when choosing a freezing or allergy medicine.

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That’s because decongestants such as pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline can increase your blood pressure and heart rate.

Make certain the freezing or allergy medication you plan to take is free of those ingredients.

Decongestants can also prevent your blood pressure medication from working properly. And always check the athletic and inactive ingredient lists, because numerous medications are high in sodium, which also raises blood pressure.

For allergy sufferers with heart disease, medicines such as Allegra, Zyrtec or Claritin should be safe. However, medicines containing decongestants — including Allegra-D, Zyrtec-D and Claritin-D — could increase your blood pressure and heart rate or interfere with your heart medication.

Before taking any new medication

Always check with your pharmacist before you take a new medication, whether it’s for a freezing, allergies or something else, to discover out if it is compatible with certain medical conditions and your current drug therapy.

SEE ALSO: Millions More People Now Own High Blood Pressure. Why That’s a Excellent Thing

If you own a heart condition, be certain to discuss every medication choices with your cardiologist before taking anything.

Path to improved well being

When your body is exposed to allergens (allergy triggers), it makes histamines.

What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

Your body releases these chemicals to attack the allergen. Unfortunately, histamines cause the itching, sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes associated with allergies. Antihistamines treat these symptoms.

How do I safely take OTC antihistamines?

Read the directions on the label before taking any medicine. Study how much to take and how often you should take it. If you own any questions about how much medicine to take, call your family doctor or pharmacist. Hold track of which OTC medicines you are using and when you take them.

If you need to go to the doctor, take the list with you.

Follow these tips to make certain you are taking the correct quantity of medicine:

  1. Take only the quantity recommended on the medicine’s label. Don’t assume that more medicine will work better or quicker. Taking more than the recommended quantity can be dangerous.
  2. Mixing medicines can be dangerous. If you take a prescription medicine, enquire your doctor if it’s okay to also take an OTC antihistamine.
  3. Don’t use more than 1 OTC antihistamine at a time unless your doctor says it’s okay. They may own similar athletic ingredients that add up to be too much medicine.

Second-generation OTC antihistamines

These are newer medicines.

Numerous treat allergy symptoms without causing sleepiness. Common kinds include:

  1. Loratadine (brand names include Alavert, Claritin)
  2. Cetirizine (brand names include Zyrtec)
  3. Fexofenadine (brand names include Allegra)

Note: Some antihistamines are mixed with other medicines. These could include pain relievers or decongestants. Numerous of the brand names above are for these combination medicines. These are meant to treat numerous symptoms at the same time. It is a excellent thought to treat just the symptoms that you own.

If you own only a runny nose, don’t select a medicine that also treats headache and fever.

First-generation OTC antihistamines

These were among the first antihistamines scientists developed. They are cheaper and widely available. They work in the part of the brain that controls nausea and vomiting. This means they can prevent motion sickness too. The most common side effects of first-generation antihistamines is feeling sleepy. For this reason, they are sometimes used to assist people who own trouble sleeping (insomnia).

Some common kinds you can purchase over the counter include:

  1. Brompheniramine (brand names include Children’s Dimetapp Cold)
  2. Diphenhydramine (brand names include Benadryl, Nytol, Sominex)
  3. Dimenhydrinate (brand names include Dramamine)
  4. Chlorpheniramine (brand names include Chlor-Trimeton, Actifed Cold)
  5. Doxylamine (brand names include Vicks NyQuil, Tylenol Freezing and Cough Nighttime)

Managing a freezing with hypertension

If you can’t take a decongestant because of high blood pressure, there are other ways to reduce your freezing or allergy symptoms:

  1. Drink plenty of fluids — including water, juice, tea and soup — to prevent dehydration and clear mucus from your lungs 

  2. Use a vaporizer or humidifier if necessary to boost humidity

  3. Get plenty of rest

  4. Flush your sinuses with a saline spray to relieve nasal congestion

  5. Take a pain reliever such as Tylenol or Motrin for fever, sore throat, body aches and headache

  6. Soothe a sore or scratchy throat with lozenges

  7. Take Coricidin HBP, which is free of decongestants

  8. Return to your doctor after five to seven days to make sure you’re on the road to recovery

How can I safely store OTC antihistamines?

Store every medicines out of reach and sight of young children.

Store in a cool, dry put so they do not lose effectiveness. Do not store them in bathrooms. These areas can get boiling and humid.

Advil Allergy Sinus

Generic Name:chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine (KLOR fen EER a meen, EYE bue pro fen, SOO doe ee FED rin)
Brand Names:Advil Allergy Sinus, Advil Childrens Allergy Sinus, Advil Multi-Symptom Cold

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Final updated on Aug 9, 2018.


Before taking this medicine

Do not use Advil Allergy Sinus if you own used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

Serious, life-threatening side effects can happen if you take Advil Allergy Sinus before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Do not use Advil Allergy Sinus if you are allergic to ibuprofen, chlorpheniramine or pseudoephedrine, or if you have:

  1. a stomach ulcer or athletic bleeding in your stomach or intestines;

  2. polyps in your nose; or

  3. a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs.

If you own certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use Advil Allergy Sinus. Before you take this medication, tell your doctor if you have:

  1. heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure;

  2. glaucoma;

  3. enlarged prostate or problems with urination; or

  4. liver or kidney disease;
  5. a thyroid disorder;

  6. a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;

  7. a history of stomach problems, including heartburn, indigestion, stomach pain, and ulcers or bleeding;

  8. asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, or if you smoke;

  9. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE);

  10. diabetes;

  11. if you smoke.

Taking an NSAID can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke.

This risk will increase the longer you use an NSAID. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can happen without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID.

What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

Older adults may own an even greater risk of these serious gastrointestinal side effects.

Advil Allergy Sinus may be harmful to an unborn baby. Taking ibuprofen during the final 3 months of pregnancy may result in birth defects and prolonged labor and delivery. Do not take Advil Allergy Sinus during the final 3 months of pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to. Chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Advil Allergy Sinus without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Ibuprofen may be more likely to cause stomach bleeding in adults who are 60 or older.

Do not give Advil Allergy Sinus to a kid younger than 12 years ancient. Always enquire a doctor before giving a cough or freezing medicine to a kid. Death can happen from the misuse of cough and freezing medicines in extremely young children.


How should I take Advil Allergy Sinus?

Use Advil Allergy Sinus exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Freezing medicine is generally taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Take this medicine with food or milk if it upsets your stomach.

What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

Do not take more of Advil Allergy Sinus than is recommended. An overdose of ibuprofen can cause damage to your stomach or intestines.

The maximum quantity of ibuprofen for adults is 800 milligrams per dose or 3200 mg per day (4 maximum doses). Use only the smallest quantity of Advil Allergy Sinus needed to get relief from your freezing or allergy symptoms. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be certain you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not own a dose-measuring device, enquire your pharmacist for one.

Call your doctor if you own any new symptoms, or if you own a fever lasting longer than 3 days, stuffy nose lasting longer than 7 days, or pain lasting longer than 10 days. Do not take Advil Allergy Sinus for longer than 10 days without your doctor’s advice.

If you need to own any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time if you own taken a freezing medicine within the past few days.

Advil Allergy Sinus can cause you to own unusual results with allergy skin tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are taking an antihistamine.

Store Advil Allergy Sinus at room temperature away from moisture and heat.


What is Advil Allergy Sinus?

Advil Allergy Sinus contains a combination of chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine.

Advil Allergy Sinus is used to treat sneezing, itching, watery eyes, runny nose, stuffy nose, sinus congestion, cough, and pain or fever and other symptoms caused by the common freezing or flu.

Advil Allergy Sinus may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.


What happens if I miss a dose?

Since freezing medicine is generally taken only as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule.

If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take additional medicine to make up the missed dose.


Important information

Do not give Advil Allergy Sinus to a kid younger than 12 years ancient. Always enquire a doctor before giving a cough or freezing medicine to a kid. Death can happen from the misuse of cough and freezing medicines in extremely young children.

Do not use Advil Allergy Sinus if you own used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body.

Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Ibuprofen is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

Ibuprofen can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Seek emergency medical assist if you own symptoms of heart or circulation problems, such as chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred lecture, or problems with vision or balance.

Ibuprofen can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole).

These conditions can be fatal and can happen without warning at any time while you are taking ibuprofen.

What is the best allergy medicine to take if you own high blood pressure

Ibuprofen may be more likely to cause stomach bleeding in adults who are 60 or older.

Call your doctor at once if you own symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This includes worsening stomach pain, black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks love coffee grounds.

You should not use Advil Allergy Sinus if you are allergic to ibuprofen, chlorpheniramine or pseudoephedrine, or if you own a stomach ulcer or athletic bleeding in your stomach or intestines, polyps in your nose, or a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs.


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