What is the allergy report for today

Some tree pollen causes more problems than others. Some of the trees that cause the most symptoms are:

  1. Cottonwood
  2. Ash
  3. Hickory
  4. Oak
  5. Olive
  6. Aspen
  7. Pecan
  8. Mulberry
  9. Cedar
  10. Beech
  11. Elm
  12. Alder
  13. Box elder
  14. Birch
  15. Mountain elder
  16. Poplar
  17. Willow

Being allergic to some trees could cause you to react to certain foods.

What is the allergy report for today

It happens because the tree pollen is similar to the protein in some fruits, vegetables and nuts.1Your immune system gets confused and can’t tell the difference between the two. Eating these foods may cause your mouth or face to itch or swell. These foods may include apples, cherries, pears and more. This is called oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Birch and alder trees cause the most OAS food reactions.

In some cases, your tree pollen allergy may cross-react with some nuts, love peanuts or almonds. If you own mouth itching or swelling while eating nuts, you could own a more serious, life-threatening reaction calledanaphylaxis, which is common with nut allergies.

If this happens to you, call your doctor correct away.


What Are the Symptoms of a Tree Pollen Allergy?

Pollen allergysymptoms are commonly called “hay fever.” Pollen released by trees, as well as grasses and weeds, cause these symptoms. They include:

  1. Itchy nose, eyes, ears and mouth
  2. Runny nose and mucus production
  3. Stuffy nose (nasal congestion)
  4. Red and watery eyes
  5. Sneezing
  6. Swelling around the eyes

If you haveallergic asthmaand are allergic to tree pollen, you might also own asthma symptoms while the trees are pollinating.

Tree pollen is finer than other pollens.

Because of this, the wind can carry it for miles. These light, dry grains easily discover their way to your sinuses, lungs and eyes, making them hard to avoid.


What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription. Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled. These medicines include:

  1. Decongestants
  2. Antihistamines
  3. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  4. Nasal corticosteroids
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy.

This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  2. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies.

    Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.

  3. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  4. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  5. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  6. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  7. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen.

    For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.

  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring. But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary 2018.

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.). Retrieved February 26, 2018, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditio…ergies-can-be-relate

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies.

By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription. Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled.

These medicines include:

  1. Decongestants
  2. Antihistamines
  3. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  4. Nasal corticosteroids
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy.

What is the allergy report for today

This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  2. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies. Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.
  3. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  4. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  5. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  6. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  7. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen.

    For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.

  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring. But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary 2018.

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.). Retrieved February 26, 2018, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditio…ergies-can-be-relate

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies.

By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

JOIN NOW

Early Solid Food Introduction: Role in Food Allergy Prevention and Implications for Breastfeeding
The Journal of Pediatrics
Elissa M. Abrams and Matthew Greenhawt and David M. Fleischer and Edmond S. Chan
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.053
05/2017

Utility of Ara h 2 sIgE levels to predict peanut allergy in Canadian children
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Sara H.

Leo and John M. Dean and Benjamin Jung and Boris Kuzeljevic and Edmond S. Chan
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2015.04.001
11/2015

Characterization of ethnicity among children with eosinophilic esophagitis in British Columbia, Canada
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Timothy Teoh and Chris Koo and Vishal Avinashi and Edmond S. Chan
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2015.04.016
09/2015

Consensus Communication on Early Peanut Introduction and Prevention of Peanut Allergy in High-Risk Infants
Pediatr Dermatol
David M.

Fleischer and Scott Sicherer and Matthew Greenhawt and Dianne Campbell and Edmond Chan and Antonella Muraro and Susanne Halken and Yitzhak Katz and Motohiro Ebisawa and Lawrence Eichenfield and Hugh Sampson and Gideon Lack and George Du Toit and Graham Roberts and Henry Bahnson and Mary Feeney and Jonathan Hourihane and Jonathan Spergel and Michael Young and Amal As’aad and Katrina Allen and Susan Prescott and Sandeep Kapur and Hirohisa Saito and Ioana Agache and Cezmi A.

What is the allergy report for today

Akdis and Hasan Arshad and Kirsten Beyer and Anthony Dubois and Philippe Eigenmann and Monserrat Fernandez-Rivas and Kate Grimshaw and Karin Hoffman-Sommergruber and Arne Host and Susanne Lau and Liam O’Mahony and Clare Mills and Nikolaus Papadopoulos and Carina Venter and Nancy Agmon-Levin and Aaron Kessel and Richard Antaya and Beth Drolet and Lanny Rosenwasser
DOI: 10.1111/pde.12685
09/2015

Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants
World Allergy Organ J
David M.

Fleischer and FOR THE LEAP TRIAL TEAM and Scott Sicherer and Matthew Greenhawt and Dianne Campbell and Edmond S. Chan and Antonella Muraro and Susanne Halken and Yitzhak Katz and Motohiro Ebisawa and Lawrence Eichenfield and Hugh Sampson and SECONDARY CONTRIBUTORS
DOI: 10.1186/s40413-015-0076-x
08/2015

Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
David M.

Fleischer and Scott Sicherer and Matthew Greenhawt and Dianne Campbell and Edmond Chan and Antonella Muraro and Susanne Halken and Yitzhak Katz and Motohiro Ebisawa and Lawrence Eichenfield and Hugh Sampson and Gideon Lack and George Du Toit and Graham Roberts and Henry Bahnson and Mary Feeney and Jonathan Hourihane and Jonathan Spergel and Michael Young and Amal As’aad and Katrina Allen and Susan Prescott and Sandeep Kapur and Hirohisa Saito and Ioana Agache and Cezmi A. Akdis and Hasan Arshad and Kirsten Beyer and Anthony Dubois and Philippe Eigenmann and Monserrat Fernandez-Rivas and Kate Grimshaw and Karin Hoffman-Sommergruber and Arne Host and Susanne Lau and Liam O’Mahony and Clare Mills and Nikolaus Papadopoulos and Carina Venter and Nancy Agmon-Levin and Aaron Kessel and Richard Antaya and Beth Drolet and Lanny Rosenwasser
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2015.06.001
08/2015

Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
David M.

Fleischer and Scott Sicherer and Matthew Greenhawt and Dianne Campbell and Edmond Chan and Antonella Muraro and Susanne Halken and Yitzhak Katz and Motohiro Ebisawa and Lawrence Eichenfield and Hugh Sampson and Gideon Lack and George Du Toit and Graham Roberts and Henry Bahnson and Mary Feeney and Jonathan Hourihane and Jonathan Spergel and Michael Young and Amal As’aad and Katrina Allen and Susan Prescott and Sandeep Kapur and Hirohisa Saito and Ioana Agache and Cezmi A. Akdis and Hasan Arshad and Kirsten Beyer and Anthony Dubois and Philippe Eigenmann and Monserrat Fernandez-Rivas and Kate Grimshaw and Karin Hoffman-Sommergruber and Arne Host and Susanne Lau and Liam O’Mahony and Clare Mills and Nikolaus Papadopoulos and Carina Venter and Nancy Agmon-Levin and Aaron Kessel and Richard Antaya and Beth Drolet and Lanny Rosenwasser
DOI: 10.1016/j.anai.2015.06.001
08/2015

Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol
David M.

Fleischer and FOR THE LEAP TRIAL TEAM and Scott Sicherer and Matthew Greenhawt and Dianne Campbell and Edmond S. Chan and Antonella Muraro and Susanne Halken and Yitzhak Katz and Motohiro Ebisawa and Lawrence Eichenfield and Hugh Sampson and SECONDARY CONTRIBUTORS
DOI: 10.1186/s13223-015-0087-8
08/2015

Accidental exposures to peanut in a large cohort of Canadian children with peanut allergy
Clin Transl Allergy
Sabrine Cherkaoui and Moshe Ben-Shoshan and Reza Alizadehfar and Yuka Asai and Edmond Chan and Stephen Cheuk and Greg Shand and Yvan St-Pierre and Laurie Harada and Mary Allen and Ann Clarke
DOI: 10.1186/s13601-015-0055-x
04/2015

CSACI position statement: systemic effect of inhaled corticosteroids on adrenal suppression in the management of pediatric asthma
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Karine Issa-El-Khoury and Harold Kim and Edmond S Chan and Tim Vander Leek and Francisco Noya
DOI: 10.1186/s13223-015-0075-z
2015

Clinical Characteristics Of Seafood Allergy In Canadian Children
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Victoria Cook and Edmond S.

Chan and Ann Elaine Clarke and Greg Shand and Moshe Ben-Shoshan
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.12.727
02/2014

IgE Mediated allergy to wheat in a kid with celiac disease
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Tiffany Wong and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-10-s1-a37
2014

Dietary exposures and allergy prevention in high-risk infants: a joint position statement of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the Canadian Paediatric Society
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Edmond S Chan and Carl Cummings and Adelle Atkinson and Zave Chad and Marie-Josée Francoeur and Linda Kirste and Douglas Mack and Marie-Noël Primeau and Timothy K Vander Leek and Wade TA Watson
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-10-45
2014

Epinephrine auto injector istration by parents or patients for anaphylaxis during supervised oral food challenges and assessment of confidence
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Ingrid Baerg and Angela Alexander and Tiffany Wong and Timothy Teoh and Kyla Hildebrand and Sara Leo and Joanne Yeung and John Dean and Edmond Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-10-s2-a2
2014

IgE-Mediated allergy to wheat in a kid with celiac disease – a case report
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Tiffany Wong and Hin Ko and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-10-56
2014

Delayed Introduction of Food and Effect On Incidence of Food Allergy in a Population At High Risk for Atopy: The Canadian Asthma Primary Prevention Study (CAPPS)
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Tiffany Wong and Moira Chan-Yeung and Roxanne Rousseau and Anne Dybuncio and Anita L.

Kozyrskyj and Clare Ramsey and Allan Becker and Edmond S.

What is the allergy report for today

Chan
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2012.12.1013
02/2013

Egg-allergic patients can be safely vaccinated against influenza
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Anne Des Roches and Louis Paradis and Remi Gagnon and Chantal Lemire and Philippe Bégin and Stuart Carr and Edmond S. Chan and Jean Paradis and Lyne Frenette and Manale Ouakki and Mélanie Benoît and Gaston De Serres
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2012.07.046
11/2012

CSACI Position statement on the testing of food-specific IgG
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Stuart Carr and Edmond Chan and Elana Lavine and William Moote
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-8-12
2012

Allergic symptoms after pandemic influenza vaccination rarely mediated by vaccine-specific IgE
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Isabelle Rouleau and Gaston De Serres and Jean Philippe Drolet and Devi Banerjee and Chantal Lemire and Andrew Moore and Louis Paradis and Reza Alizadhefar and Anne Des Roches and Edmond S.

What is the allergy report for today

Chan and Donald Stark and Mélanie Benoit and Danuta M. Skowronski
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2012.07.019
2012

Outcome of diagnostic intervention predicts health-related quality of life scores among children with food allergy
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Linda Kirste and Tim K Takaro and Boris Kuzeljevic and Tiffany Wong and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-8-s1-a9
2012

What are the beliefs of pediatricians and dietitians regarding complementary food introduction to prevent allergy?
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Sara Leo and John Dean and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-8-3
2012

What are the beliefs of pediatricians and dietitians regarding complementary food introduction to prevent allergy?
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Sara H Leo and John M Dean and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-7-s2-a3
2011

Serum sickness-like reaction associated with meropenem in a 3-year ancient child
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Sara H Leo and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-6-s2-p31
2010

Safety of H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines in egg allergic patients in British Columbia
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Sara H Leo and John Dean and Edmond S Chan
DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-6-s2-p4
2010

Epinephrine for the out-of-hospital (first-aid) treatment of anaphylaxis in infants: Is the ampule/syringe/needle method practical?
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
F.Estelle R.

Simons and Edmond S. Chan and Xiaochen Gu and Keith J. Simons
DOI: 10.1067/mai.2001.119916
2001

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone.

Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology. The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis.

It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat.

What is the allergy report for today

It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library. As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

With 1 in 10 Japanese affected, the allergies own become a national obsession. By tardy February, one of the most closely watched items in the news every day is a running count of the cedar pollen in the air. Tokyo has two large electronic billboards on which it flashes the figures, and the city runs allergy boiling lines.

"At the peak, you can actually see a pollen fog coming from the cedar forests," said Dr.

Yozo Saito, an allergy specialist at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and head of a commission on the problem for the Tokyo metropolitan government. "It is so bad that when people first began to notice this a decade or so ago they thought there were forest fires."

The reforestation policy represents a side of Japan's industrial policy little known exterior the country, but obvious to anyone who has explored the countryside. In numerous parts of Japan, beautiful natural scenery has been transformed into monotonous tableaus of a uniform dark green.

The miles of tall, slender cedars, straight as telephone poles, make up almost 20 percent of Japan's forests, or more than 10 million acres. The policy illustrates the surprisingly manipulative view the Government has taken of the environment, in spite of the revered put mountains, forests, streams and lakes hold in traditional Japanese culture.

For example, every but two of the country's rivers own been dammed or diverted, or directed into concrete embankments. The number of lakes and wetlands still in their natural state, already tiny, has declined to only 210 from 233 in the mid-1980's, according to the Government, with the remainder in some way built up.

But the reforestation strategy, driven by subsidies that cover about half the cost of replanting, was perhaps the grandest attempt to make the environment a cog in the country's industrial strategy.

There are 62.3 million acres of forest in Japan, covering two-thirds of the country's mountainous land area.

But 41 percent of the forests own been artificially planted, and 44 percent of the reforested area is planted with cedar, formally known as Cryptomeria japonica.

"The reforestation policy was a failure," said Tsunahide Shitei, the previous president of Kyoto Prefectural University and one of Japan's leading forestry experts. "During the high-growth years of the economy, the Forestry Agency was dragged into this fast-growth atmosphere and focused only on commercial concerns.

They should own planted broadleaf trees as well.

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