What is my food allergy

What is my food allergy

Guidelines for managing food allergies in kid care

Policy Statement

Cybertots Kid Care Centre believes that children’s mealtimes are enjoyable occasions which can offer positive learning opportunities that urge children to establish and develop healthy eating habits. Children’s food preferences are always respected, and special diets are followed. Family religious and cultural beliefs and practices are embraced and they are given the opportunities to be athletic participants in the planning and implementation of the menu. Staff will be given the appropriate training and resources to carry out the Nutrition and Food Handling Policy.

Peanut Butter will not be stored or used at the centre.

Considerations:

  1. Philosophy — Children to develop a healthy, positive attitude toward food and experience a healthy nutritional diet.
  2. Children’s Needs — Children to enjoy meal times and to establish positive healthy eating habits. Medical needs to be considered.
  3. Staff Needs — Get training and appropriate resources.
  4. Legislation — This will vary from State to State and be dependent upon current Legislation.
  5. Parents Needs — Families religious and cultural preferences to be respected.
  6. Management — Clear guidelines enabling Committee to fulfil Management tasks.

How Policy will be implemented (Specific Policies and Procedures):

Food allergies should not be thought of lightly as serious situations can develop extremely quickly when a kid has an allergic reaction to food or drink.

At enrolment, the child’s parent(s) and/or guardian(s) are asked for details of any allergies the kid may own.

This information is then recorded on the child’s enrolment records. However, if the kid is extremely young, the parent(s) and/or guardian(s) may not yet be aware that an allergy exists.

Please follow these guidelines at every times:

  1. Parents of children just starting to eat solids will be asked to provide a list of foods their kid has already experienced. When the centre menu is introducing a new food this parent will be contacted and given the choice of introducing the food item at home first.
  2. Make certain the list of children with food allergies is displayed clearly to every staff preparing or serving snacks and/or meals.
  3. Become familiar with the foods/drinks that potentially contain allergens.
  4. Cybertots must own authorisation to ister medicine where required.
  5. Ask parent(s) and/or guardian(s) to provide doctor’s advice on details of the allergy and what are suitable substitutions.
  6. Don’t isolate the kid who has an allergy.

    It is significant to include foods in the menu that everyone can eat.

  7. Encourage the kid to take responsibility for their food selections. They need to develop life skills to help them as they get older.
  8. Kristin Sokol, Marjohn Rasooly, Caeden Dempsey, Sheryce Lassiter, Wenjuan Gu, Keith Lumbard, Pamela A Frischmeyer‐Guerrerio.

    What is my food allergy

    Prevalence and Diagnosis of Sesame Allergy in Children with IgE‐Mediated Food Allergy. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2019; DOI: 10.1111/pai.13143

It is significant to appreciate that every kid is diverse. Even if two children own an allergy to the same food, there will be some extremely distinct individual differences. For this reason, it is necessary for kid care centres to get as much information as possible from the child’s parent(s) and/or guardian(s), doctor(s) and dietician(s).

Brochures and information on food allergies are available for staff and parents in the foyer area of Cybertots.

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health own found that sesame allergy is common among children with other food allergies, occurring in an estimated 17% of this population.

In addition, the scientists own found that sesame antibody testing — whose utility has been controversial — accurately predicts whether a kid with food allergy is allergic to sesame. The research was published on Oct. 28 in the journal Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

«It has been a challenge for clinicians and parents to determine if a kid is truly allergic to sesame,» said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. «Given how frequently sesame allergy occurs among children who are allergic to other foods, it is significant to use caution to the extent possible when exposing these children to sesame.»

Sesame is among the 10 most common childhood food allergies.

Only an estimated 20% to 30% of children with sesame allergy outgrow it. Severe reactions to sesame are common among sesame-allergic children. About 1.1 million people in the United States, or an estimated 0.23% of the U.S. population, own sesame allergy, according to a recently published study funded by NIAID.

What is my food allergy

These factors underscore the need to optimize recognition and diagnosis of this allergy. The Food and Drug istration is currently considering whether to include sesame in the list of allergens that must be disclosed on food labels.

Standard allergy tests — the skin-prick test and the allergen-specific antibody test — own been inconsistent in predicting an allergic reaction to sesame. Numerous studies evaluating the utility of these tests for sesame allergy own included only children suspected to own sesame allergy.

Taking a diverse approach, scientists led by Pamela A. Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, M.D., Ph.D., deputy chief of the NIAID Laboratory of Allergic Diseases and chief of its Food Allergy Research Unit, evaluated the sesame antibody test in a group of 119 children with food allergy whose sesame-allergic status was unknown.

The researchers offered children in the study an oral food challenge — the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy — which involved ingesting gradually increasing amounts of sesame under medical supervision and seeing if an allergic reaction occurred.

Children who recently had had an allergic reaction to sesame or were known to tolerate concentrated sesame, such as tahini, in their diet were not offered an oral food challenge.

The scientists found that 15 (13%) of the 119 children were sesame-allergic, 73 (61%) were sesame-tolerant, and sesame-allergic status could not be sure for 31 (26%) children, mainly because they declined the oral food challenge. Among the 88 children whose sesame-allergic status was definitive, 17% had sesame allergy.

The scientists measured the quantity of an antibody called sesame-specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) in the blood of these 88 children. With this data and information on the children’s sesame-allergic status, the researchers developed a mathematical model for predicting the probability that a kid with food allergy is allergic to sesame.

According to the model, children with more than 29.4 kilo international units of sIgE per liter of serum own a greater than 50% chance of being allergic to sesame. This model will need to be validated by additional studies, however, before it can be used in clinical practice.


Story Source:

Materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  • Kristin Sokol, Marjohn Rasooly, Caeden Dempsey, Sheryce Lassiter, Wenjuan Gu, Keith Lumbard, Pamela A Frischmeyer‐Guerrerio.

    Prevalence and Diagnosis of Sesame Allergy in Children with IgE‐Mediated Food Allergy. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2019; DOI: 10.1111/pai.13143

  • The key component of this research is dendritic cells, which serve as the gate-keepers of the immune system and are present in tissues in contact with the external environment, such as the skin and the inner lining of the nose, lungs, stomach and intestines.
  • Gordon’s pioneering treatment involves producing dendritic cells in a test tube and then exposing them to a unique stir of proteins, a vitamin A-related acid naturally occurring in the human gut, and to the allergen, in this case, peanut or ovalbumin (egg white protein).

    The modified dendritic cells are then reintroduced into the mouse. 

  • Using this technique, the researchers were capable to almost eliminate the allergic reaction by converting allergen-sensitive immune cells into cells that mimic the response seen in healthy, non-allergic individuals.  

make a difference: sponsored opportunity

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily.

ScienceDaily, 4 November 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm>.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2019, November 4). Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

S aureus in Children With Eczema May Frolic a Role in Development of Food Allergies

Young children with severe eczema who are infected with Staphylococcus aureus may be at a higher risk of developing a food allergy, investigators at King’s College London found in a new study.

Published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the study sought to investigate the association of S aureus colonization with specific Immunoglobulin E (sIgE) production with common food allergens and allergies in early childhood independent of eczema severity.

“It is well established that patients with eczema are frequently affected by colonization of their skin (and their nose) with Staphylococcus aureus,” Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, a physician at King’s College London and the first author on the study, told Contagion®.

“The authors, therefore, set [out] to investigate [whether] patients with eczema are more prone to develop food sensitization/allergy if they are colonized with this bacterium.”

Investigators collected nasal and skin swabs from young children with severe eczema enrolled in the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) and LEAP-On (12-month extension of the LEAP study: Persistence of Oral Tolerance to Peanut) studies at baseline and at 12, 30, and 60 months of age, and cultured them for S aureus.

Sensitization was identified via measuring sIgE levels, peanut allergies were identified primarily via oral food challenge, and persistent egg allergies were identified primarily via skin prick tests.

A entire of 48.8% of the 640 participants had some form of S aureus colonization (32.2% skin and 32.3% nasal) on at least 1 LEAP study visit, though most of the children had positive test results only once. Participants between 4 and 11 months of age recorded the greatest rates of colonization (18% for skin and 15% for nose). S aureus colonization and concurrent eczema severity (measured via the SCORAD index) were significantly associated across every study time points.

Participants who has S aureus isolated from their skin also had higher levels of IgE antibodies to hen’s egg and peanuts than those who never had S aureus during approximately a 4-year follow-up.

What is my food allergy

Children with S aureus present on their skin or in their noses were 1.57 (95% CI, 1.02-2.42; P = .042) times more likely to own their egg allergies persist at age 5 or 6 years compared with children who were not colonized with the bacterium.

“This is significant as most children with [an] egg allergy generally outgrow this at an earlier age,” Tsilochristou said. “[The] authors also reported that the children that had S aureus were more likely to develop [a] peanut allergy despite them being fed with peanut from early ages as part of the LEAP study protocol.

This was particularly exciting as it suggests that S aureus infection may own potentiated an accelerated form of peanut allergy development and/or inhibited tolerance mechanisms through peanut consumption.”

Of note, Tsilochristou pointed out, was that the results were independent of eczema severity.

The study results indicate that clinicians should consider S aureus as an additional risk factor in the development of food allergies, and also as a potential environmental factor when considering future interventions in inducing or maintaining tolerance to food allergens.

According to Tsilochristou, future studies may focus on advanced techniques and interventional methods of eradicating S aureus in early infancy.

To stay informed on the latest in infectious disease news and developments, please sign upfor our weekly newsletter.JUN 04, 2019 | ALEXANDRA WARD

“This discovery reverses food allergies in mice, and we own numerous people with allergies volunteering their own cells for us to use in lab testing to move this research forward,” said professor John Gordon, lead scientist behind the discovery just published in the current issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The findings open the door to test this new allergy treatment in “humanized mice”—mice with non-existent immune systems implanted with cells from a human immune system, for example, from a peanut-allergic person.

With Health Canada approval, the first human trial could start in about one year, Gordon said. 

“If we can reliably ‘cure’ food allergies, or related conditions such as asthma or autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis with this new therapy, it would be life-changing for affected individuals.”

Roughly 2.5 million Canadians self-report having at least one food allergy.  Anaphylaxis, defined as a severe rapid-onset allergic reaction, can be life-threatening and treatment options are limited.

The discovery involves generating a type of naturally occurring immune cell that sends a signal to reverse the hyper-immune response present in allergic reactions.  That signal triggers another “off switch” that turns off reactive cells further along the allergic pathway. 

“We predict the treatment could be on the market within the next five to 10 years,” said Gordon, who is also a research leader in the Allergy, Genes and Environment (AllerGen) Network.

AllerGen—part of the federally funded Networks of Centres of Excellence program—aims to assist Canadians address the challenges of living with asthma, allergies, anaphylaxis and related immune diseases.

Gordon’s team will collaborate with other AllerGen investigators located at the U of S, McGill University, Queen’s University, McMaster University, and University of Alberta to pilot the new technique.

“This discovery portends a major breakthrough towards a therapeutic reversal of food allergen sensitivity,” said Dr.

Judah Denburg, scientific director and CEO of AllerGen. “The treatment prevents anaphylactic responses in what were previously fully sensitive mice, opening the door for translating this therapy into the clinic.”

There is compelling evidence this technique could be effective in humans.  In 2010, Gordon’s team demonstrated they could reverse an asthmatic response in human cells in a test tube. Using three applications of a similar therapy in a 2012 study, the researchers effectively eliminated asthma in afflicted mice, within only eight weeks.

“Even if we only cure 25 per cent of subjects, we will dramatically improve the health of those individuals, and also reduce healthcare system expenses,” said Gordon, who worked with Wojciech Dawicki, a research associate and the primary author and lead researcher in this study.

Master’s student Chunyan Li and lab technicians Xiaobei Zhang and Jennifer Town also worked on the project.

Here’s how the technique works:

  1. The key component of this research is dendritic cells, which serve as the gate-keepers of the immune system and are present in tissues in contact with the external environment, such as the skin and the inner lining of the nose, lungs, stomach and intestines.
  2. Gordon’s pioneering treatment involves producing dendritic cells in a test tube and then exposing them to a unique stir of proteins, a vitamin A-related acid naturally occurring in the human gut, and to the allergen, in this case, peanut or ovalbumin (egg white protein).

    The modified dendritic cells are then reintroduced into the mouse. 

  3. Using this technique, the researchers were capable to almost eliminate the allergic reaction by converting allergen-sensitive immune cells into cells that mimic the response seen in healthy, non-allergic individuals.  

The treatment reduced the observed symptoms of anaphylaxis, and lowered other key protein markers in the allergic response by up to 90 per cent.

Food allergy is a growing public health issue in Canada.

Currently, there is no known cure. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, an estimated 171,000 Canadians visited emergency rooms for allergic reactions from 2013 to 2014, the rate of anaphylaxis visits increased by 95 per cent from 2006 to 2014, and the severity of reactions is increasing.

Gordon said the new technique also shows promise for treating autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. “It would take extremely little to adapt the therapy for autoimmune diseases,” he said.

Funding for the research was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the AllerGen Networks of Centres of Excellence.

 

For thousands of families, Halloween can be especially scary if their little one has a food allergy.

This is why one mom in 2012 took matters into her own hands to start an initiative aimed at making this time of year less tricky for children with food allergies and discover treats that are safe.

READ MORE: Teal pumpkin project helps provide a safe Halloween for kids with food allergies

The “Teal Pumpkin Project” signals to trick-or-treaters love three-year-old Ellie Roth – who has severe food allergies to egg products, peanuts and tree nuts – that a home is handing out non-food items love glow sticks and stickers.

Story continues under advertisement

“This is our second year, I didn’t know about it until final year,” Ellie’s mom, Deanna Doherty, said.

“We actually had no kids with food allergies come to the home but the benefit is that the toys and stuff, they don’t go bad, so I just pack them up with my Halloween decorations and they’re excellent to go next year.”

No one gets left out but perhaps more importantly, said Doherty, each and every kid stays safe.

More than half of every traditional Halloween candy could cause Ellie to own an allergic reaction, even just one bite.

“It would almost be a guaranteed hospital visit,” Doherty said.

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“We would own to use her Epipen here at home and … we own to call an ambulance as well and they would go directly to Royal University Hospital where she would be monitored for a minimum of six hours.”

Story continues under advertisement

READ MORE: Supporters step up in Markham, Ont.

What is my food allergy

to lift awareness of severe food allergies

Even more peace of mind though could be correct around the corner for families living with food allergies. Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) tell may own discovered a cure after developing a new immunotherapy technique.

“We found that we can reverse allergic disease in animal models asthma and food allergy induced anaphylaxis.”

“It’s fairly remarkable actually it is a mouse model and this needs to be translated into humans but it’s the first time I believe that anybody has shown that we can successfully reverse that sensitivity and that lethality of peanut allergies, egg allergies and food allergies in general,” said Dr.

John Gordon, the lead scientist behind the more than decade-long discovery.

Story continues under advertisement

With Health Canada’s approval, the first human trial could start within the year.

“One of the problems we own now is every of our treatments for allergy are symptomatic in nature, so they reduce symptoms, they manage symptoms and we can do that extremely well for numerous allergies,” Gordon said.

“This is an approach that will actually eliminate the allergy.”

Tweet This

Research that has the potential to impact as numerous as 2.5 million Canadians with food allergies, including little Ellie.

“If I wasn’t worried about a life-threatening reaction when I’m not there or even when I am there – life would just be way easier,” Doherty said.

Related News

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


make a difference: sponsored opportunity

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm>.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2019, November 4). Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.

ScienceDaily.

What is my food allergy

Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

S aureus in Children With Eczema May Frolic a Role in Development of Food Allergies

Young children with severe eczema who are infected with Staphylococcus aureus may be at a higher risk of developing a food allergy, investigators at King’s College London found in a new study.

Published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the study sought to investigate the association of S aureus colonization with specific Immunoglobulin E (sIgE) production with common food allergens and allergies in early childhood independent of eczema severity.

“It is well established that patients with eczema are frequently affected by colonization of their skin (and their nose) with Staphylococcus aureus,” Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, a physician at King’s College London and the first author on the study, told Contagion®.

“The authors, therefore, set [out] to investigate [whether] patients with eczema are more prone to develop food sensitization/allergy if they are colonized with this bacterium.”

Investigators collected nasal and skin swabs from young children with severe eczema enrolled in the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) and LEAP-On (12-month extension of the LEAP study: Persistence of Oral Tolerance to Peanut) studies at baseline and at 12, 30, and 60 months of age, and cultured them for S aureus.

Sensitization was identified via measuring sIgE levels, peanut allergies were identified primarily via oral food challenge, and persistent egg allergies were identified primarily via skin prick tests.

A entire of 48.8% of the 640 participants had some form of S aureus colonization (32.2% skin and 32.3% nasal) on at least 1 LEAP study visit, though most of the children had positive test results only once. Participants between 4 and 11 months of age recorded the greatest rates of colonization (18% for skin and 15% for nose).

S aureus colonization and concurrent eczema severity (measured via the SCORAD index) were significantly associated across every study time points.

Participants who has S aureus isolated from their skin also had higher levels of IgE antibodies to hen’s egg and peanuts than those who never had S aureus during approximately a 4-year follow-up. Children with S aureus present on their skin or in their noses were 1.57 (95% CI, 1.02-2.42; P = .042) times more likely to own their egg allergies persist at age 5 or 6 years compared with children who were not colonized with the bacterium.

“This is significant as most children with [an] egg allergy generally outgrow this at an earlier age,” Tsilochristou said.

“[The] authors also reported that the children that had S aureus were more likely to develop [a] peanut allergy despite them being fed with peanut from early ages as part of the LEAP study protocol. This was particularly exciting as it suggests that S aureus infection may own potentiated an accelerated form of peanut allergy development and/or inhibited tolerance mechanisms through peanut consumption.”

Of note, Tsilochristou pointed out, was that the results were independent of eczema severity.

The study results indicate that clinicians should consider S aureus as an additional risk factor in the development of food allergies, and also as a potential environmental factor when considering future interventions in inducing or maintaining tolerance to food allergens.

According to Tsilochristou, future studies may focus on advanced techniques and interventional methods of eradicating S aureus in early infancy.

To stay informed on the latest in infectious disease news and developments, please sign upfor our weekly newsletter.JUN 04, 2019 | ALEXANDRA WARD

“This discovery reverses food allergies in mice, and we own numerous people with allergies volunteering their own cells for us to use in lab testing to move this research forward,” said professor John Gordon, lead scientist behind the discovery just published in the current issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The findings open the door to test this new allergy treatment in “humanized mice”—mice with non-existent immune systems implanted with cells from a human immune system, for example, from a peanut-allergic person.

With Health Canada approval, the first human trial could start in about one year, Gordon said. 

“If we can reliably ‘cure’ food allergies, or related conditions such as asthma or autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis with this new therapy, it would be life-changing for affected individuals.”

Roughly 2.5 million Canadians self-report having at least one food allergy.  Anaphylaxis, defined as a severe rapid-onset allergic reaction, can be life-threatening and treatment options are limited.

The discovery involves generating a type of naturally occurring immune cell that sends a signal to reverse the hyper-immune response present in allergic reactions.  That signal triggers another “off switch” that turns off reactive cells further along the allergic pathway. 

“We predict the treatment could be on the market within the next five to 10 years,” said Gordon, who is also a research leader in the Allergy, Genes and Environment (AllerGen) Network.

AllerGen—part of the federally funded Networks of Centres of Excellence program—aims to assist Canadians address the challenges of living with asthma, allergies, anaphylaxis and related immune diseases.

Gordon’s team will collaborate with other AllerGen investigators located at the U of S, McGill University, Queen’s University, McMaster University, and University of Alberta to pilot the new technique.

“This discovery portends a major breakthrough towards a therapeutic reversal of food allergen sensitivity,” said Dr.

Judah Denburg, scientific director and CEO of AllerGen. “The treatment prevents anaphylactic responses in what were previously fully sensitive mice, opening the door for translating this therapy into the clinic.”

There is compelling evidence this technique could be effective in humans.  In 2010, Gordon’s team demonstrated they could reverse an asthmatic response in human cells in a test tube. Using three applications of a similar therapy in a 2012 study, the researchers effectively eliminated asthma in afflicted mice, within only eight weeks.

“Even if we only cure 25 per cent of subjects, we will dramatically improve the health of those individuals, and also reduce healthcare system expenses,” said Gordon, who worked with Wojciech Dawicki, a research associate and the primary author and lead researcher in this study.

Master’s student Chunyan Li and lab technicians Xiaobei Zhang and Jennifer Town also worked on the project.

Here’s how the technique works:

  1. The key component of this research is dendritic cells, which serve as the gate-keepers of the immune system and are present in tissues in contact with the external environment, such as the skin and the inner lining of the nose, lungs, stomach and intestines.
  2. Gordon’s pioneering treatment involves producing dendritic cells in a test tube and then exposing them to a unique stir of proteins, a vitamin A-related acid naturally occurring in the human gut, and to the allergen, in this case, peanut or ovalbumin (egg white protein).

    The modified dendritic cells are then reintroduced into the mouse. 

  3. Using this technique, the researchers were capable to almost eliminate the allergic reaction by converting allergen-sensitive immune cells into cells that mimic the response seen in healthy, non-allergic individuals.  

The treatment reduced the observed symptoms of anaphylaxis, and lowered other key protein markers in the allergic response by up to 90 per cent.

Food allergy is a growing public health issue in Canada. Currently, there is no known cure. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, an estimated 171,000 Canadians visited emergency rooms for allergic reactions from 2013 to 2014, the rate of anaphylaxis visits increased by 95 per cent from 2006 to 2014, and the severity of reactions is increasing.

Gordon said the new technique also shows promise for treating autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

“It would take extremely little to adapt the therapy for autoimmune diseases,” he said.

Funding for the research was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the AllerGen Networks of Centres of Excellence.

 

For thousands of families, Halloween can be especially scary if their little one has a food allergy.

This is why one mom in 2012 took matters into her own hands to start an initiative aimed at making this time of year less tricky for children with food allergies and discover treats that are safe.

READ MORE: Teal pumpkin project helps provide a safe Halloween for kids with food allergies

The “Teal Pumpkin Project” signals to trick-or-treaters love three-year-old Ellie Roth – who has severe food allergies to egg products, peanuts and tree nuts – that a home is handing out non-food items love glow sticks and stickers.

Story continues under advertisement

“This is our second year, I didn’t know about it until final year,” Ellie’s mom, Deanna Doherty, said.

“We actually had no kids with food allergies come to the home but the benefit is that the toys and stuff, they don’t go bad, so I just pack them up with my Halloween decorations and they’re excellent to go next year.”

No one gets left out but perhaps more importantly, said Doherty, each and every kid stays safe.

More than half of every traditional Halloween candy could cause Ellie to own an allergic reaction, even just one bite.

“It would almost be a guaranteed hospital visit,” Doherty said.

Tweet This

“We would own to use her Epipen here at home and … we own to call an ambulance as well and they would go directly to Royal University Hospital where she would be monitored for a minimum of six hours.”

Story continues under advertisement

READ MORE: Supporters step up in Markham, Ont.

to lift awareness of severe food allergies

Even more peace of mind though could be correct around the corner for families living with food allergies. Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) tell may own discovered a cure after developing a new immunotherapy technique.

“We found that we can reverse allergic disease in animal models asthma and food allergy induced anaphylaxis.”

“It’s fairly remarkable actually it is a mouse model and this needs to be translated into humans but it’s the first time I believe that anybody has shown that we can successfully reverse that sensitivity and that lethality of peanut allergies, egg allergies and food allergies in general,” said Dr.

John Gordon, the lead scientist behind the more than decade-long discovery.

Story continues under advertisement

With Health Canada’s approval, the first human trial could start within the year.

“One of the problems we own now is every of our treatments for allergy are symptomatic in nature, so they reduce symptoms, they manage symptoms and we can do that extremely well for numerous allergies,” Gordon said.

“This is an approach that will actually eliminate the allergy.”

Tweet This

Research that has the potential to impact as numerous as 2.5 million Canadians with food allergies, including little Ellie.

“If I wasn’t worried about a life-threatening reaction when I’m not there or even when I am there – life would just be way easier,” Doherty said.

Related News

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


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