What is clarithromycin allergy

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses.

What is clarithromycin allergy

Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed under are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects own been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Numerous of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome.

Your pharmacist may be capable to advise you on managing side effects.

  1. gas
  2. headache
  3. abdominal pain
  4. disorientation
  5. change in sense of taste
  6. nausea
  7. confusion
  8. dizziness
  9. heartburn
  10. diarrhea (mild)
  11. vomiting

Although most of the side effects listed under don’t happen extremely often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  1. skin rash
  2. symptoms of liver problems (e.g., abdominal tenderness, yellow eyes or skin, skin rash, itching, dark urine)
  3. severe abdominal or stomach cramps and pain
  4. watery and severe diarrhea, which may also be bloody

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  1. symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (e.g., hives; difficulty breathing; sore throat; or swelling of the face, mouth, throat, or tongue)
  2. abnormal or irregular heartbeat
  3. symptoms of a severe skin reaction (e.g., peeling or blistering skin)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you start using a medication, be certain to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may own, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Abnormal heart rhythm: Clarithromycin may cause a heart rhythm problem called QT prolongation. If you own a history of QT prolongation, a medical condition associated with QT prolongation, or are taking certain medications (e.g., amiodarone, sotalol), discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Allergy: If you own had some form of allergy to erythromycin or azithromycin, you may be more likely to own an allergic reaction to this medication.

If you develop symptoms of an allergic reaction such as a rash, contact your doctor. If you develop hives; difficulty breathing; or swelling of the face, mouth, throat, or tongue, stop taking this medication and get immediate medical attention.

Antibiotic resistance: Medications such as clarithromycin should only be used to treat infections caused by bacteria. Misuse of overuse of this medication may result in the growth of bacteria that are no longer killed by clarithromycin, particularly in people who are also infected with HIV.

What is clarithromycin allergy

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Diarrhea: As with other antibiotics, clarithromycin is associated with a serious infection called Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea, caused by the bacteria C. difficile. This can happen as tardy as 2 months after your final dose of this medication.

If you own loose, watery bowel movements especially if they are green, foul-smelling, or bloody and accompanied by fever, either during or after taking clarithromycin, get medical attention as soon as possible.

Dizziness, confusion, and disorientation: This medication can cause dizziness, confusion, or disorientation.

Do not drive or operate machinery until you are certain that this medication does not affect your ability to act out these tasks safely.

Kidney function: Kidney disease or reduced kidney function may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects. If you own reduced kidney function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Liver problems: Liver disease or reduced liver function may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects.

If you own reduced liver function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. This medication should not be used by people with severe liver problems.

If you develop symptoms of liver problems (e.g., loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, itchy skin, abdominal pain), contact your doctor immediately.

Myasthenia gravis: This medication can worsen or cause symptoms of myasthenia gravis.

If your symptoms worsen or you develop new symptoms such as double vision, drooping eyelids, muscle weakness, or difficulty chewing or swallowing, contact your doctor.

Pregnancy: Clarithromycin should not be used during pregnancy, especially the first 3 months of pregnancy, unless there is no appropriate alternative therapy. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor.

Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk.

If you are a breast-feeding mom and are taking clarithromycin, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of using clarithromycin oral suspension own not been established for children younger than 6 months of age. For pneumonia, the use of clarithromycin oral suspension has not been studied for children younger than 3 years of age. The safety and effectiveness of using clarithromycin to prevent MAC infection has not been studied for children under the age of 20 months. The safety and effectiveness of using clarithromycin tablets own not been established for children less than 12 years of age.


How should I use this medication?

Adults: The recommended adult dosing of clarithromycin tablets is 250mg to 500mg twice daily (every 12 hours) for 7 to 14 days, depending on the condition being treated.

The recommended adult dosing of the extended release form of clarithromycin is 1,000mg (2 tablets) once daily for 5 to 14 days, depending on the condition being treated.

For the treatment and prevention of MAC, the usual dose of clarithromycin is 500mg twice daily.

When used with other medications to kill H. pylori, the usual dose of clarithromycin is 500mg twice daily for 10 days.

Children: The recommended entire daily dose for children is 15mg per kilogram of body weight (to a maximum of 1,000mg per day). This entire daily dose should be divided in 2 equal doses given 12 hours apart. Entire treatment duration is generally 5 to 10 days, depending on the condition being treated. For the treatment and prevention of MAC, the usual dose of clarithromycin is 7.5mg per kilogram of body weight twice daily (up to 500mg twice daily).

If the kid is receiving an oral suspension of clarithromycin, use an oral syringe to measure each dose of the liquid, as it gives a more precise measurement than household teaspoons.

Clarithromycin tablets and clarithromycin suspension (given twice daily) may be taken with or without food.

Taking this medication with food may cause less stomach upset.

The extended release tablets of clarithromycin must be taken with food. The tablets must be swallowed whole and not crushed or broken.

Finish every of this medication, even if you own started to feel better.

Numerous things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications.

What is clarithromycin allergy

If your doctor has recommended a dose diverse from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is significant to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule.

Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not certain what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store clarithromycin tablets at room temperature, protect them from light and moisture, and hold them out of the reach of children.

Store clarithromycin oral suspension at room temperature with the bottle tightly closed and protected from light. Do not refrigerate. Any unused oral suspension should be thrown away after 14 days. Rinse the dose measuring oral syringe between uses. Do not store the suspension in the syringe.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g.

below the sink or in the toilet) or in household trash. Enquire your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or own expired.


What is clarithromycin?

Clarithromycin is an antibiotic that is used to treat numerous diverse types of bacterial infections affecting the skin and respiratory system.

What is clarithromycin allergy

Clarithromycin is also used together with other medicines to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori.

Clarithromycin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.


Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take clarithromycin if you:

  • are allergic to clarithromycin or any ingredients of this medication
  • are allergic to other macrolide antibiotics, such as erythromycin or azithromycin
  • have had jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) or liver problems associated with taking clarithromycin
  • have severe liver failure in addition to decreased kidney function
  • have or own had QT prolongation (an abnormal electrical activity of the heart) or an abnormal heart rhythm
  • have untreated hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood)
  • are taking any of the following medications:
    1. pimozide
    2. “statin” cholesterol lowering medications (e.g., lovastatin, simvastatin)
    3. astemizole
    4. oral midazolam
    5. cisapride
    6. terfenadine
    7. colchicine
    8. ergot alkaloids (e.g., dihydroergotamine, ergonovine, ergotamine, methylergonovine)
    9. saquinavir
    10. ticagrelor



    The usual dose of clarithromycin is 250mg to 500mg twice a day.

    The dose may be lower for children and if you own kidney problems.

    If your doctor prescribes slow release or modified release tablets, the dose is 500mg once a day.

    These tablets release the medicine slowly, which means that 1 dose a day is enough.

    Try to take your medicine at the same time every day.

    What if I forget to take it?

    If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember, unless it’s almost time for your next dose.

    In this case, just leave out the missed dose and take your next dose as normal.

    Never take 2 doses at the same time. Never take an additional dose to make up for a forgotten one.

    If you often forget doses, it may assist to set an alarm to remind you.

    You could also enquire your pharmacist for other ways to remember your medicine.

    How to take it

    Clarithromycin tablets come in 250mg or 500mg strengths.

    Swallow clarithromycin tablets or capsules whole with a drink of water, with or without food.

    Do not chew or break them.

    Clarithromycin granules come in 250mg sachets. Open the pack — or packets — and stir the granules with a little quantity of water to drink.

    There’s also a liquid clarithromycin for children and people who discover it hard to swallow tablets.

    If you or your kid are taking clarithromycin as a liquid, your pharmacist will generally make it up for you.

    What is clarithromycin allergy

    The medicine will come with a plastic syringe or spoon to assist you take the correct quantity.

    If you don’t own a syringe or spoon, enquire your pharmacist for one.

    Do not use a kitchen teaspoon as it will not give the correct amount.

    What if I take too much?

    Taking an additional dose of clarithromycin by accident is unlikely to harm you or your kid.

    It may give you temporary side effects, love stomach pain, feeling and being ill, and diarrhoea.

    Talk to your pharmacist or doctor if you’re worried or get severe side effects, or if you or your kid accidentally take more than 1 additional dose.

    Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children.

    What is clarithromycin allergy

    Store the tablets at room temperature and away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). Do not refrigerate the suspension. Hold it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture. Discard any unused suspension after 14 days.

    It is significant to hold every medication out of sight and reach of children as numerous containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately put the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach.

    Up and Away

    Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication below the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to study about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA’s Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not own access to a take-back program.

    How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

    Clarithromycin belongs to the group of medications called macrolide antibiotics. It is used to treat infections caused by certain bacteria. It works by killing or stopping the growth of bacteria that can cause certain infections.

    Clarithromycin may be prescribed for people with bacterial throat infections, sinus infections, ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, and skin infections such as impetigo and cellulitis.

    Clarithromycin may also be used to prevent and treat certain infections (mycobacterium avium complicated or MAC), associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Clarithromycin can be used in combination with other medications to kill H. pylori, a bacteria known to cause ulcers in the digestive tract.

    This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several diverse forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in every of the forms or approved for every of the conditions discussed here.

    As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for every of the conditions discussed here.

    Your doctor may own suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you own not discussed this with your doctor or are not certain why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

    Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they own the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.


    What form(s) does this medication come in?

    250mg
    Each yellow, film-coated, oval tablet, debossed with "93" on one side and "7157" on the other side, contains 250mg of clarithromycin.

    What is clarithromycin allergy

    Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal anhydrous silica, croscarmellose sodium, hypromellose, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, polyethylene glycol, sodium starch glycolate, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, FD&C Blue No.2/indigo carmine aluminum lake, yellow iron oxide and artificial vanilla flavor.

    500mg
    Each light yellow, film-coated, oval tablet, debossed with "93" on one side and "7158" on the other side, contains 500 mg of clarithromycin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal anhydrous silica, croscarmellose sodium, hypromellose, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, polyethylene glycol, sodium starch glycolate, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, FD&C Blue No.2/indigo carmine aluminum lake, yellow iron oxide and artificial vanilla flavor.


    What other drugs could interact with this medication?

    There may be an interaction between clarithromycin and any of the following:

    1. oxybutynin
    2. pimozide
    3. aprepitant
    4. mifepristone
    5. almotriptan
    6. zidovudine
    7. chloral hydrate
    8. ergot alkaloids (e.g., dihydroergotamine, ergonovine, ergotamine, methylergonovine)
    9. phenobarbital
    10. praziquantel
    11. lomitapide
    12. donepezil
    13. carbamazepine
    14. lidocaine
    15. tacrolimus
    16. vilanterol
    17. quinidine
    18. trazodone
    19. metronidazole
    20. quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin)
    21. cabergoline
    22. ulipristal
    23. insulin
    24. "statin" anti-cholesterol medications (e.g., atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin)
    25. propafenone
    26. anti-cancer medications (e.g., cabazitaxel, docetaxel; doxorubicin; etoposide, ifosfamide, irinotecan, vincristine)
    27. rifampin
    28. domperidone
    29. modafinil
    30. tolterodine
    31. cimetidine
    32. oxcarbazepine
    33. maprotiline
    34. octreotide
    35. tramadol
    36. methadone
    37. quinine
    38. perampanel
    39. "gliptin" diabetes medications (e.g., linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin)
    40. serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; e.g., duloxetine, venlafaxine)
    41. bromocriptine
    42. mefloquine
    43. fentanyl
    44. corticosteroids (e.g., dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone)
    45. eplerenone
    46. prasugrel
    47. HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs; e.g., delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, nevirapine)
    48. loperamide
    49. benzodiazepines (e.g., clonazepam, diazepam, lorazepam)
    50. St.

      John’s wort

    51. bosentan
    52. pentamidine
    53. phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil)
    54. theophyllines (e.g., aminophylline, oxtriphylline, theophylline)
    55. phenytoin
    56. nateglinide
    57. calcitriol
    58. clopidogrel
    59. sirolimus
    60. tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., dasatinib, imatinib, nilotinib)
    61. colchicine
    62. tamoxifen
    63. ranitidine
    64. procainamide
    65. formoterol
    66. simeprevir
    67. rifabutin
    68. grapefruit juice
    69. guanfacine
    70. cyclosporine
    71. cinacalcet
    72. alpha blockers (e.g., alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin)
    73. fingolimod
    74. progestins (e.g., dienogest, levonorgestrel, medroxyprogesterone, norethindrone)
    75. other macrolide antibiotics (e.g., azithromycin, erythromycin)
    76. lithium
    77. HIV protease inhibitors (e.g., atazanavir, indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir)
    78. chloroquine
    79. fentanyl
    80. amantadine
    81. macitentan
    82. calcium channel blockers (e.g., amlodipine, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil)
    83. buprenorphine
    84. sulfonylureas (e.g., glyburide, gliclazide, tolbutamide)
    85. sirolimus
    86. indacaterol
    87. valproic acid
    88. nadolol
    89. trimethoprim
    90. darifenacin
    91. dutasteride
    92. flutamide
    93. telaprevir
    94. famotidine
    95. mirabegron
    96. dabigatran
    97. sulfamethoxazole
    98. primaquine
    99. rivaroxaban
    100. flecainide
    101. tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, clomipramine, desipramine, trimipramine)
    102. typhoid vaccine
    103. abiraterone acetate
    104. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., citalopram, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)
    105. ethosuximide
    106. anti-psychotics (e.g., chlorpromazine, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone)
    107. boceprevir
    108. ticlopidine
    109. deferasirox
    110. "azole" antifungals (e.g., itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole)
    111. apixaban
    112. ticagrelor
    113. nitrates (e.g., isosorbide dinitrate, isosorbide mononitrate)
    114. rilpivirine
    115. dronedarone
    116. aliskiren
    117. mirtazapine
    118. tetracycline
    119. tolvaptan
    120. warfarin
    121. oxycodone
    122. bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine
    123. estrogens (e.g., conjugated estrogen, estradiol, ethinyl estradiol, norethindrone)
    124. buspirone
    125. romidepsin
    126. medications used to treat diabetes (e.g., pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, repaglinide)
    127. brentuximab
    128. tetrabenazine
    129. bisoprolol
    130. digoxin
    131. maraviroc
    132. nasal and inhaled corticosteroids (e.g., budesonide, ciclesonide, fluticasone)
    133. dronabinol
    134. sotalol
    135. anti-emetic medications (serotonin antagonists; e.g., granisetron, ondansetron)
    136. enzalutamide
    137. brinzolamide
    138. disopyramide
    139. dapsone
    140. indapamide
    141. divalproex
    142. amiodarone
    143. eletriptan
    144. nefazodone
    145. antihistamines (e.g,.

      What is clarithromycin allergy

      cetirizine, doxylamine, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, loratadine)

    146. galantamine
    147. salmeterol
    148. conivaptan
    149. everolimus
    150. montelukast
    151. zopiclone

    If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may desire you to:

    1. change one of the medications to another,
    2. change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
    3. stop taking one of the medications,
    4. leave everything as is.

    An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

    Medications other than the ones listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about every prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications that you are taking.

    Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or highway drugs can affect the action of numerous medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

    All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may own regarding a medical condition.

    Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Teva-Clarithromycin

    What is the most significant information I should know about clarithromycin?

    You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to clarithromycin or similar antibiotics, if you own ever had jaundice or liver problems caused by taking clarithromycin, or if you own liver or kidney disease and are also taking colchicine.

    Tell your doctor about every your current medicines and any you start or stop using.

    Many drugs can interact with clarithromycin, and some drugs should not be used together.


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