What is allergy prone skin

Textbook contact dermatitis symptoms include reddened, raised bumps and itchy skin. Sometimes, little fluid-filled blisters also develop.

But, contact dermatitis is not always this acute or severe. You may own mild irritant contact dermatitis without obvious itchy rash. Sometimes the only symptom is dry skin. Maybe it's a flaky patch that never seems to go away completely.

Or, maybe your skin just looks slightly reddened and dehydrated no matter how often you moisturize.

Your skin may own a rough, uneven or sandpapery glance. Skin may feel boiling to the touch or glance flushed.

Your face is the most common put to develop his mild, chronic type of contact dermatitis. It's especially likely to crop up on the eyelids, cheeks, around the corners of the nose and mouth, and the chin.

Timing

Mild chronic contact dermatitis is most often caused by skincare products: soap, facial cleansers or body washes, lotions or creams, toners, or makeup. While allergic contact dermatitis will typically happen soon after application, irritant contact dermatitis reaction can develop over time and sometimes take years before symptoms develop.

It's precisely because we use our skincare products every day, week after week, month after month, that irritation can develop.

It's not that the products are "bad" or "unhealthy" per se. It's simply that long-term exposure to any topical substance can potentially chip away at the architecture of skin without us even knowing.

One such example is a facial cleanser that makes your skin squeaky clean. In fact, you may be stripping significant natural moisturizing factor (NMF) needed to protect the skin. Over time, the cleanser will no longer "clean" the skin but instead compromise the exterior barrier of cells known as the stratum corneum.

Signs and Symptoms of Contact Dermatitis


Types of Reactions

Dermatitis is the term used to describe any red, itchy, irritation of the skin.

When it's caused by something that touches the skin, it's called contact dermatitis. Skincare products, makeup, and personal care products love deodorant and shampoo are common causes of contact dermatitis.

Around 80% of every contact dermatitis cases are irritant contact dermatitis.Your skin is irritated or sensitive to something that you've touched. Irritant contact dermatitis can develop quickly after exposure to an offending substance, within a few hours or even minutes. But it can also take days or sometimes weeks for irritation to develop.

Whenever we own a reaction to a product, we often tell that we're "allergic" to it, but this isn't always the case.

By contrast, allergic contact dermatitis is a true allergy to a substance.

In allergic contact dermatitis, the reaction is often more severe with intensely red, itchy, swollen skin. The reaction typically takes about 12 hours to develop and peaks about 48 hours after exposure.


Cause of Allergy-Prone Skin

The specific cause of why you own sensitive allergy-prone skin is unknown. Heredity may be one reason, or frequent use of highly irritating products and lack of proper skin care. There are certain ingredients that are most commonly sure to cause irritation and symptoms.

Common allergy producing ingredients include:

  1. Formaldehyde

  2. Preservatives, such as parabens

  3. Fragrance

  4. Sulfates, specially sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)

  5. Botanicals, such as plant extracts and essential oils

Diagnosis

Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate and severe allergies. There are several diverse testing methods available. The most common is a blood test that checks for antigen induced antibodies in the dog’s blood.

Intradermal skin testing may also be performed. In this method of testing, a little quantity of antigen is injected into a shaved portion of the dog’s skin. This is done in a specific pattern and order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the offending antigen can be identified. After a period of time (hours), the shaved area is examined to detect which antigens, if any, created a reaction. Allergy testing is performed to develop a specific therapy for the allergic animal.

Common Allergy-Prone Skin Conditions

If you own sensitive skin and your immune system is triggered every time to reply with a reaction to an ingredient or situation, then your own an allergic skin condition.

  1. Contact derrmatitis is localized in the area that your body contacted an irritating ingredient. It shows up with red rash that itches, or with dry patches and tenderness. Products such as soap, cosmetics, and deodorant are some of the causes.

  2. Hives (urticaria) occurs when your skin contacts something you’re allergic to. Your skin reacts by becoming red, white or with appearance of itchy welts. These welts may final more than six weeks and may appear again over months or years (Mayo Clinic).

    Hives can be large or little, and appear anywhere on your body, even vanish in one area and show up in another rather quickly. It’s thought thyroid disease or lupus may be the cause of hives. It’s significant to discover the triggers, such as irritating ingredients, and avoid them.

  3. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is common and estimated to affect one in fifty adults). With eczema, your skin can become red, extremely itchy, scaly, or raw with little, raised bumps. The area that it may show up the most are the folds of the elbows, backs of the knees or the front of the neck.

    It can final for years or even a lifetime, but the symptoms come and go, often accompanied by hay fever or asthma. There is no cure, but managing the itching can be accomplished by using non-irritating soaps, moisturizers and other skin and personal care products. If you discover it hard to sleep or to manage your daily life, see your doctor for further treatment with medicated creams and ointments.

  4. Seborrheic skin condition signs and symptoms (Mayo Clinic) include patchy scaling scalp, red, greasy skin with white or yellow scales.

    Generally affects the oily areas of the body, such as your face, and upper chest and back. It’s known as cradle cap when you see it with infants.

Recommended Products for Care of Sensitive Allergy-Prone Skin

Over-the-Counter Remedies for Sensitive Allergy-Prone Skin

With sensitive allergy-prone skin, most of the reactions final a while and get better eventually on their own. There are certain non-prescription remedies you can use to assist with the symptoms:

  1. Hydrocortisone creams to assist with itching.

  2. Antihistamines such as hydroxyzine to assist control itching.

If the symptoms become worse or spreads, see your dermatologist or general physician.

Best Care of Sensitive Allergy-Prone Skin

The most significant factor in preventing flareups of sensitive allergy-prone skin, is to manage and avoid the triggers.

  1. Live a healthy lifestyle, including nutritious meals, proper exercise and well managed stress.

  2. Only purchase non-irritating sensitive skin care products.

  3. Use a safe sensitive skin sunblock that has non-comedogenic on the label. This means it will not clog pores.

  4. Use a tender cleanser that is free of perfume and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS).

    Select one that fits your skin type, that is either for oily, dry or combination skin. Don’t over wash your face, but use warm water (never boiling or cold) no more than two times a day. Never rub, but pat dry with a soft towel.

  5. Avoid products that contain plant extracts and essential oils.

  6. Avoid preservatives such as parabens.

  7. Only use fragrance-free skin care products. Fragrances contain highly irritating ingredients.

  8. Moisturize with skin care for your skin type that is free of salicylates.

    Salicylic acid is often added to skin care products for anti-aging or to control inflammation and acne. However, salicylates may irritate your skin.

  9. Donald Y. M. Leung, Agustin Calatroni, Livia S. Zaramela, Petra K. LeBeau, Nathan Dyjack, Kanwaljit Brar, Gloria David, Keli Johnson, Susan Leung, Marco Ramirez-Gama, Bo Liang, Cydney Rios, Michael T. Montgomery, Brittany N. Richers, Clifton F. Hall, Kathryn A. Norquest, John Jung, Irina Bronova, Simion Kreimer, C. Conover Talbot, Debra Crumrine, Robert N.

    Cole, Peter Elias, Karsten Zengler, Max A. Seibold, Evgeny Berdyshev, Elena Goleva. The nonlesional skin surface distinguishes atopic dermatitis with food allergy as a unique endotype. Science Translational Medicine, 2019; 11 (480): eaav2685 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aav2685

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Infants who develop eczema are more likely to develop food allergies, hay fever and asthma as they grow older, a progression known as the atopic march.

Donald Leung, MD, PhD, head of Pediatric Allergy & Clinical Immunology at National Jewish Health, has identified itching and dry cracked skin of eczema patients as a significant promoter of the atopic march. Moisturizers, especially early in a child’s life, may assist prevent eczema, food allergies and other allergic diseases.

«When food particles are introduced through the skin rather than the digestive system, they are much more likely to cause allergies,» said Dr. Leung. «Cracks in the skin of those with eczema often set off a chain of allergic diseases that develop over several years.»

Seventeen-year-old Ava Segur experienced the atopic march first hand.

What is allergy prone skin

It started with eczema when she was just six weeks ancient. Her mom, Stephanie, says they were trying to get her skin inflammation under control, when they were suddenly confronted with another problem. «She had hives every over her arms and neck,» she said. «So we took her to the hospital and found out she is allergic to peanuts, pine nuts and shellfish.» A few years later, Ava developed exercise-induced asthma.

Ava has participated in numerous clinical trials seeking better treatments for eczema and a better understanding of the atopic march.

«If we can discover a solution that will work to stop this before it starts, it will be extremely rewarding to know that I was capable to be a part of that,» said Ava.

«Restoring the skin barrier as soon as eczema develops is the best way to stop the atopic march in its tracks and prevent allergic diseases from developing,» said Dr. Leung.

The skin forms an significant barrier, keeping moisture in and external allergens or microbes out. Research by Dr. Leung has shown that patients with eczema lack significant proteins and lipids in the outer layers of their skin. As a result of eczema patients’ faulty skin barrier, water escapes from the skin, drying it out and leading to cracking and itching.

Cracked, itchy skin is a hallmark of eczema.

Scratching the dry, itchy skin of eczema patients can further damage the skin barrier and activate the immune system. Increasing evidence compiled by Dr. Leung and others indicates that food particles entering the body through cracks in the skin can trigger an allergic response that leads to food allergy. Once that allergic response has been triggered, the immune system is primed to develop not only eczema and food allergies, but also hay fever and asthma.

To do this, experts recommend what they call «soak and seal,» which involves thoroughly moisturizing the skin in a warm bath, then trapping the moisture in with a moisturizing ointment.

It’s a method Kriston Kline says helped her 19-month-old son’s skin start to heal within a week.

«It provided him with immediate relief, and each time we do a soak-and-seal treatment, his skin looks so much better,» said Kline. «Not only is this making him more comfortable now, but if it can assist protect him from allergies and asthma, that is a huge benefit for his future.»

Dr. Leung believes that careful care of a baby’s skin correct from birth could prevent eczema and other allergic diseases.

A baby’s skin is particularly susceptible to drying out when it first emerges from the warm, watery environment of the womb into the dry air of the exterior world. A few little studies own suggested that regular treatment with skin moisturizers can assist reduce an infant’s chances of developing eczema and the other diseases in the atopic march.

What is allergy prone skin

Dr. Leung is currently working to confirm those studies and identify the ideal moisturizer components to prevent eczema and the other diseases of the atopic march.


Story Source:

Materials provided by National Jewish Health. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  • Donald Y. M. Leung, Agustin Calatroni, Livia S.

    Zaramela, Petra K. LeBeau, Nathan Dyjack, Kanwaljit Brar, Gloria David, Keli Johnson, Susan Leung, Marco Ramirez-Gama, Bo Liang, Cydney Rios, Michael T. Montgomery, Brittany N. Richers, Clifton F. Hall, Kathryn A. Norquest, John Jung, Irina Bronova, Simion Kreimer, C. Conover Talbot, Debra Crumrine, Robert N. Cole, Peter Elias, Karsten Zengler, Max A. Seibold, Evgeny Berdyshev, Elena Goleva. The nonlesional skin surface distinguishes atopic dermatitis with food allergy as a unique endotype.

    Science Translational Medicine, 2019; 11 (480): eaav2685 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aav2685


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Cite This Page:

National Jewish Health. «Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases: Protecting and moisturizing the skin may assist prevent food allergies, asthma and hay fever.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 July 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190717230345.htm>.

National Jewish Health. (2019, July 17).

Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases: Protecting and moisturizing the skin may assist prevent food allergies, asthma and hay fever. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190717230345.htm

National Jewish Health. «Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases: Protecting and moisturizing the skin may assist prevent food allergies, asthma and hay fever.» ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190717230345.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

One of the most common medical complaints that we see in our office is dogs with skin infections, “hot spots”, or allergic dermatitis, also known as atopic (atopy) dermatitis.

Unlike people who react to allergens most commonly with nasal symptoms and/or hives, dogs react with skin and/or gastrointestinal problems.

This is because there are a higher proportion of mast cells, which release histamines and other vasoactive substances in the face of an allergic challenge, in the skin of dogs. These problems may range from poor jacket texture or hair length, to itching and chewing, to boiling spots and self-mutilation, gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, diarrhea, and flatulence. Allergies may also frolic a part in chronic ear infections. The most common causes of canine allergic dermatitis are flea allergy, food allergy, inhalant or contact allergy, and allergy to the normal bacterial flora and yeast organisms of the skin. To make matters more hard to diagnose and treat, thyroid disease may add to the problem as well.

Canine atopic dermatitis (allergic dermatitis, canine atopy) is an inherited predisposition to develop allergic symptoms following repeated exposure to some otherwise harmless substance, an “allergen”.

Most dogs start to show their allergic signs between 1 and 3 years of age. Due to the hereditary nature of the disease, several breeds, including Golden Retrievers, most terriers, Irish Setters, Lhasa Apsos, Dalmatians, Bulldogs, and Ancient English Sheep dogs are more commonly atopic, but numerous dogs, including mixed breed dogs can own atopic dermatitis. Atopic animals will generally rub, lick, chew, bite, or scratch at their feet, flanks, ears, armpits, or groin, causing patchy or inconsistent hair loss and reddening and thickening of the skin. The skin itself may be dry and crusty or oily depending upon the dog.

Dogs may also rub their face on the carpet; ear flaps may become red and boiling. Because the wax-producing glands of the ear overproduce as a response to the allergy, they get bacterial and yeast (Malassezia ) infections of the ear.

In order to overcome these frustrating symptoms, your veterinarian’s approach needs to be thorough and systematic. Shortcuts generally will not produce results and only add to owner frustration and canine discomfort.

Inhalant and Contact Allergies
Substances that can cause an allergic reaction in dogs are much the same as those that cause reactions in people including the pollens of grasses, trees and weeds, dust mites, and molds.

A clue to diagnosing these allergies is to glance at the timing of the reaction. Does it happen year round? This may be mold or dust. If the reaction is seasonal, pollens may be the culprit.

Food Allergies
Numerous people don’t suspect food allergies as the cause of their dog’s itching because their pet has been fed the same food every its life and has just recently started having symptoms.

However, animals can develop allergies to a substance over time, so this fact does not law out food allergies. Another common misconception is that dogs are only sensitive to poor quality food. If the dog is allergic to an ingredient, it doesn’t matter whether it is in premium food or the most inexpensive brand on the market. One advantage to premium foods is that some avoid common fillers that are often implicated in allergic reactions.

Flea Allergies
This type of reaction generally is not to the flea itself, but rather to proteins in its saliva.

Interestingly enough, the dogs most prone to this problem are not dogs who are constantly flea ridden, but those who are exposed only occasionally! A single bite can cause a reaction for five to seven days, so you don’t need a lot of fleas to own a miserable dog.

Staphylococcus Hypersensitivity
Bacterial hypersensitivity occurs when a dog’s immune system overreacts to the normal Staphylococcus (Staph) bacteria on its skin. It appears that bacterial hypersensitivity in the dog is more likely to happen if other conditions such as hypothyroidism, inhalant allergy, and/or flea allergy are concurrently present.

Bacterial hypersensitivity is diagnosed through bacterial culture and examination of a biopsy sample. Microscopically, there are certain unique changes in the blood vessels of the skin in bacterial hypersensitivity.

Treatment

Medicated Baths
Numerous medicated shampoos own compounds in them that are aimed at soothing injured skin and calming inflammation. In addition, frequent bathing (weekly to every other week) of the dog can remove allergens from the hair jacket, which may contribute to skin allergy flare-ups.

What is allergy prone skin

The medicated baths we recommend are those that actually contain antimicrobial and antifungal agents as well as ingredients that permit the skin to be bathed on a more frequent basis without drying it out. Application of a rinse afterwards also helps to prevent drying out of the skin and hair coat.

Antihistamines
Antihistamines can be used with excellent safety in dogs. About one third of owners report success with antihistamines. These medications tend to own a variable effect between dogs. For some allergic dogs, antihistamines work extremely well in controlling symptoms of allergic skin disease.

For other dogs, extremely little effect is seen. Therefore, a minimum of three diverse types of antihistamines should be tried before owners give up on this therapy. Examples of antihistamines commonly used for dogs include Benadryl, Chlortrimeton, Atarax, Claritin, Zyrtec, and Clemastine. However, antihistamines are considered to be worth trying in most cases since the side effects associated with antihistamines is low, and they are typically inexpensive medications.

Antibiotics and Antifungal Medications
Antibiotics are frequently needed to treat secondary skin infections. Anti-fungal medications are frequently needed to treat secondary yeast infections.

Flea Control
For dogs with this problem, a strict flea control regime must be maintained.

The best flea control options include the use of products such as Advantage, Revolution, Frontline, Comfortis, and Sentinel.

Supplements
The Omega-3 and Omega-6 essential fatty acid supplements work by improving the overall health of the skin. These fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agents. They reportedly are helpful in 20% of allergic dogs. My own experience puts this figure a little higher.

They are certainly worth a attempt because they are not harmful and own virtually no side effects. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish oils and omega-6 fatty acids are derived from plants containing gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). These supplements are diverse from those sold to produce a glossy jacket. Products that contain both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids include Allergen Caps and Halo.

Hypoallergenic Diets
Allergies develop through exposure, so most hypoallergenic diets incorporate proteins and carbohydrates that your dog has never had before.

As mentioned previously, the quickest and best way to determine which foods your dog may or may not be allergic to is through diagnostic allergy testing. As dairy, beef, and wheat are responsible for 80% of food allergies in dogs, these items should be avoided. Novel protein sources used in hypoallergenic diets include venison, egg, duck, kangaroo, and types of fish not generally found in pet food. Carbohydrate sources include potatoes, peas, yams, sweet potatoes, and canned pumpkin.

Hydrolyzed protein diets are diets in which the protein source has been synthetically reduced to little fragments. The theory behind feeding a hydrolyzed protein source is that the proteins in the food should be little enough that the allergic dog’s immune system will not recognize the protein fragments and will not mount an immune response resulting in an allergy.

Most pets with food allergies reply well when switched to a store-bought hypoallergenic diet, but occasionally an animal suffers from such extreme allergies that a homemade diet is the only option.

In this case, the diet should be customized with the aid of a veterinarian.

Corticosteroids and Immunosuppressive Agents
Cortisone products such as prednisone, prednisolone, and dexamethasone reduce itching by reducing inflammation. These medications are not without side effects, so they need to be used judiciously in treating skin allergies. Steroids should be considered only when the allergy season is short, the quantity of drug required is little, or to relieve a dog in extreme discomfort. Side effects can include increased thirst and appetite, increased need to urinate, and behavioral changes. Long-term use can result in diabetes and decreased resistance to infection.

In some dogs, endless term, low-dose alternate day therapy is the only management protocol that successfully controls the atopic pet. This protocol should be used only as a final resort after every other methods own been exhausted to avoid the potential long-term complications of the medication.

Cyclosporine (Atopica) is a medication, which seems to be fairly effective at reducing the inflammation associated with skin allergies and calming the immune system of the affected dog.

However, the pricing of cyclosporine may be prohibitive for larger breed dogs.

Immunotherapy (Hypo-sensitization)
Allergy shots are extremely safe, and numerous people own grand success with them; however, they are extremely slow to work. It may be six to twelve months before improvement is seen. Once the allergens for the dog are identified, an appropriate immunotherapy is manufactured for that specific dog, and treatment can start. After the offending antigens are identified, then a mixture of these antigens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection. Depending on the type of agents used, these injections will be given over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the agents.

After initial protection, an occasional booster may own to be given.

Environmental Control
If you know which substances your dog is allergic to, avoidance is the best method of control. Even if you are desensitizing the dog with allergy shots, it is best to avoid the allergen altogether. Molds can be reduced by using a dehumidifier or placing activated charcoal on top of the exposed dirt in your home plants. Dusts and pollens are best controlled by using an air cleaner with a HEPA filter. Air conditioning can also reduce circulating amounts of airborne allergens because windows are then kept closed.

Thyroid Medication
Healthy skin and a normal hair jacket are the results of numerous factors, both external and internal.

There are several glands in the body responsible for the production of hormones that are vital for the regulation of other body functions as well as a normal skin surface and hair jacket. Hypothyroidism may result in poor skin and hair jacket, including hair loss or abnormal hair turnover, dull or brittle hair, altered pigmentation, and oily or dry skin. A blood test is a simplest and most direct way to tell if your dog is hypothyroid. Thyroid testing may include every or part of the following:

Baseline T4 Test or Entire T4 (TT4): This is the most common test. Dogs with a failure of the thyroid gland will own a lowered level of the T4 hormone.

However, there are other conditions that can cause the T4 to decrease, so if this test comes back positive for hypothyroidism your vet should recommend an additional blood test, either the T3 Test or the Baseline TSH test.

Baseline TSH Test: Measures the level of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. In combination with the T4 or T3 test, it provides a more finish picture of the hormonal activity of your dog’s thyroid gland.

Free T4 by RIA (radio immunoassay): The Free T4 test using RIA techniques does not appear to be more or less precise than the above TT4 test.

Free T4 by ED (equilibrium dialysis): This test may provide more precise data on the level of T4 hormone in your dog’s bloodstream.

Baseline T3 Test: In combination with the T4 or TSH test, these two blood tests can give a clearer picture of the hormone levels found in the bloodstream.

This test is not dependable when used alone. The T3 Test should always be given in combination with one of the other blood tests.

TSH Response Test: In this test, the veterinarian takes an initial measurement of the thyroid hormones in your dog’s bloodstream and then injects Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) into the vein. After 6 hours, a blood sample is drawn and the level of T4 is checked. If your dog has hypothyroidism, the level of T4 will not increase even after the TSH is injected. This is an expensive test and is being used less often due to decreased production by the manufacturers.

Hypothyroidism is treated with a daily dose of synthetic thyroid hormone called thyroxine (levothyroxine).

Blood samples will need to be drawn periodically to assess the effectiveness of the dosage and make any adjustments necessary.

Successful management of the atopic, allergic dog is sometimes complicated and frustrating because multi-modal management is necessary in the majority of cases to control the allergic flare-ups. Proper diagnosis by a veterinarian and owner compliance and follow up care is essential to maximize the chances of curing or at least controlling the severely affected allergy patient.



An itchy red rash after using a cosmetic is an obvious sign of an irritant or allergic reaction.

But sometimes sensitivity to skincare products can be more insidious and sneaky, causing extreme dryness and flakiness, pimple-like bumps, and uneven skin tone. These seemingly unrelated skin problems may also be a sign that you are sensitive to the products you're putting on your skin.


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Cite This Page:

National Jewish Health. «Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases: Protecting and moisturizing the skin may assist prevent food allergies, asthma and hay fever.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 July 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190717230345.htm>.

National Jewish Health.

(2019, July 17). Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases: Protecting and moisturizing the skin may assist prevent food allergies, asthma and hay fever. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190717230345.htm

National Jewish Health. «Cracks in the skin of eczema patients promote allergic diseases: Protecting and moisturizing the skin may assist prevent food allergies, asthma and hay fever.» ScienceDaily.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190717230345.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

One of the most common medical complaints that we see in our office is dogs with skin infections, “hot spots”, or allergic dermatitis, also known as atopic (atopy) dermatitis.

Unlike people who react to allergens most commonly with nasal symptoms and/or hives, dogs react with skin and/or gastrointestinal problems. This is because there are a higher proportion of mast cells, which release histamines and other vasoactive substances in the face of an allergic challenge, in the skin of dogs. These problems may range from poor jacket texture or hair length, to itching and chewing, to boiling spots and self-mutilation, gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, diarrhea, and flatulence.

What is allergy prone skin

Allergies may also frolic a part in chronic ear infections. The most common causes of canine allergic dermatitis are flea allergy, food allergy, inhalant or contact allergy, and allergy to the normal bacterial flora and yeast organisms of the skin. To make matters more hard to diagnose and treat, thyroid disease may add to the problem as well.

Canine atopic dermatitis (allergic dermatitis, canine atopy) is an inherited predisposition to develop allergic symptoms following repeated exposure to some otherwise harmless substance, an “allergen”. Most dogs start to show their allergic signs between 1 and 3 years of age. Due to the hereditary nature of the disease, several breeds, including Golden Retrievers, most terriers, Irish Setters, Lhasa Apsos, Dalmatians, Bulldogs, and Ancient English Sheep dogs are more commonly atopic, but numerous dogs, including mixed breed dogs can own atopic dermatitis.

Atopic animals will generally rub, lick, chew, bite, or scratch at their feet, flanks, ears, armpits, or groin, causing patchy or inconsistent hair loss and reddening and thickening of the skin. The skin itself may be dry and crusty or oily depending upon the dog. Dogs may also rub their face on the carpet; ear flaps may become red and boiling. Because the wax-producing glands of the ear overproduce as a response to the allergy, they get bacterial and yeast (Malassezia ) infections of the ear.

In order to overcome these frustrating symptoms, your veterinarian’s approach needs to be thorough and systematic.

Shortcuts generally will not produce results and only add to owner frustration and canine discomfort.

Inhalant and Contact Allergies
Substances that can cause an allergic reaction in dogs are much the same as those that cause reactions in people including the pollens of grasses, trees and weeds, dust mites, and molds. A clue to diagnosing these allergies is to glance at the timing of the reaction. Does it happen year round? This may be mold or dust. If the reaction is seasonal, pollens may be the culprit.

Food Allergies
Numerous people don’t suspect food allergies as the cause of their dog’s itching because their pet has been fed the same food every its life and has just recently started having symptoms.

However, animals can develop allergies to a substance over time, so this fact does not law out food allergies. Another common misconception is that dogs are only sensitive to poor quality food. If the dog is allergic to an ingredient, it doesn’t matter whether it is in premium food or the most inexpensive brand on the market. One advantage to premium foods is that some avoid common fillers that are often implicated in allergic reactions.

Flea Allergies
This type of reaction generally is not to the flea itself, but rather to proteins in its saliva.

Interestingly enough, the dogs most prone to this problem are not dogs who are constantly flea ridden, but those who are exposed only occasionally! A single bite can cause a reaction for five to seven days, so you don’t need a lot of fleas to own a miserable dog.

Staphylococcus Hypersensitivity
Bacterial hypersensitivity occurs when a dog’s immune system overreacts to the normal Staphylococcus (Staph) bacteria on its skin. It appears that bacterial hypersensitivity in the dog is more likely to happen if other conditions such as hypothyroidism, inhalant allergy, and/or flea allergy are concurrently present. Bacterial hypersensitivity is diagnosed through bacterial culture and examination of a biopsy sample.

Microscopically, there are certain unique changes in the blood vessels of the skin in bacterial hypersensitivity.

Treatment

Medicated Baths
Numerous medicated shampoos own compounds in them that are aimed at soothing injured skin and calming inflammation. In addition, frequent bathing (weekly to every other week) of the dog can remove allergens from the hair jacket, which may contribute to skin allergy flare-ups. The medicated baths we recommend are those that actually contain antimicrobial and antifungal agents as well as ingredients that permit the skin to be bathed on a more frequent basis without drying it out.

Application of a rinse afterwards also helps to prevent drying out of the skin and hair coat.

Antihistamines
Antihistamines can be used with excellent safety in dogs. About one third of owners report success with antihistamines. These medications tend to own a variable effect between dogs. For some allergic dogs, antihistamines work extremely well in controlling symptoms of allergic skin disease. For other dogs, extremely little effect is seen. Therefore, a minimum of three diverse types of antihistamines should be tried before owners give up on this therapy.

Examples of antihistamines commonly used for dogs include Benadryl, Chlortrimeton, Atarax, Claritin, Zyrtec, and Clemastine. However, antihistamines are considered to be worth trying in most cases since the side effects associated with antihistamines is low, and they are typically inexpensive medications.

Antibiotics and Antifungal Medications
Antibiotics are frequently needed to treat secondary skin infections.

Anti-fungal medications are frequently needed to treat secondary yeast infections.

Flea Control
For dogs with this problem, a strict flea control regime must be maintained. The best flea control options include the use of products such as Advantage, Revolution, Frontline, Comfortis, and Sentinel.

Supplements
The Omega-3 and Omega-6 essential fatty acid supplements work by improving the overall health of the skin. These fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agents. They reportedly are helpful in 20% of allergic dogs.

My own experience puts this figure a little higher. They are certainly worth a attempt because they are not harmful and own virtually no side effects. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish oils and omega-6 fatty acids are derived from plants containing gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). These supplements are diverse from those sold to produce a glossy jacket. Products that contain both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids include Allergen Caps and Halo.

Hypoallergenic Diets
Allergies develop through exposure, so most hypoallergenic diets incorporate proteins and carbohydrates that your dog has never had before.

As mentioned previously, the quickest and best way to determine which foods your dog may or may not be allergic to is through diagnostic allergy testing. As dairy, beef, and wheat are responsible for 80% of food allergies in dogs, these items should be avoided. Novel protein sources used in hypoallergenic diets include venison, egg, duck, kangaroo, and types of fish not generally found in pet food. Carbohydrate sources include potatoes, peas, yams, sweet potatoes, and canned pumpkin.

Hydrolyzed protein diets are diets in which the protein source has been synthetically reduced to little fragments.

The theory behind feeding a hydrolyzed protein source is that the proteins in the food should be little enough that the allergic dog’s immune system will not recognize the protein fragments and will not mount an immune response resulting in an allergy.

Most pets with food allergies reply well when switched to a store-bought hypoallergenic diet, but occasionally an animal suffers from such extreme allergies that a homemade diet is the only option. In this case, the diet should be customized with the aid of a veterinarian.

Corticosteroids and Immunosuppressive Agents
Cortisone products such as prednisone, prednisolone, and dexamethasone reduce itching by reducing inflammation.

These medications are not without side effects, so they need to be used judiciously in treating skin allergies. Steroids should be considered only when the allergy season is short, the quantity of drug required is little, or to relieve a dog in extreme discomfort. Side effects can include increased thirst and appetite, increased need to urinate, and behavioral changes. Long-term use can result in diabetes and decreased resistance to infection. In some dogs, endless term, low-dose alternate day therapy is the only management protocol that successfully controls the atopic pet. This protocol should be used only as a final resort after every other methods own been exhausted to avoid the potential long-term complications of the medication.

Cyclosporine (Atopica) is a medication, which seems to be fairly effective at reducing the inflammation associated with skin allergies and calming the immune system of the affected dog.

However, the pricing of cyclosporine may be prohibitive for larger breed dogs.

Immunotherapy (Hypo-sensitization)
Allergy shots are extremely safe, and numerous people own grand success with them; however, they are extremely slow to work. It may be six to twelve months before improvement is seen. Once the allergens for the dog are identified, an appropriate immunotherapy is manufactured for that specific dog, and treatment can start. After the offending antigens are identified, then a mixture of these antigens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection. Depending on the type of agents used, these injections will be given over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the agents.

After initial protection, an occasional booster may own to be given.

Environmental Control
If you know which substances your dog is allergic to, avoidance is the best method of control. Even if you are desensitizing the dog with allergy shots, it is best to avoid the allergen altogether. Molds can be reduced by using a dehumidifier or placing activated charcoal on top of the exposed dirt in your home plants.

Dusts and pollens are best controlled by using an air cleaner with a HEPA filter. Air conditioning can also reduce circulating amounts of airborne allergens because windows are then kept closed.

Thyroid Medication
Healthy skin and a normal hair jacket are the results of numerous factors, both external and internal. There are several glands in the body responsible for the production of hormones that are vital for the regulation of other body functions as well as a normal skin surface and hair jacket.

Hypothyroidism may result in poor skin and hair jacket, including hair loss or abnormal hair turnover, dull or brittle hair, altered pigmentation, and oily or dry skin. A blood test is a simplest and most direct way to tell if your dog is hypothyroid. Thyroid testing may include every or part of the following:

Baseline T4 Test or Entire T4 (TT4): This is the most common test. Dogs with a failure of the thyroid gland will own a lowered level of the T4 hormone. However, there are other conditions that can cause the T4 to decrease, so if this test comes back positive for hypothyroidism your vet should recommend an additional blood test, either the T3 Test or the Baseline TSH test.

Baseline TSH Test: Measures the level of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone.

In combination with the T4 or T3 test, it provides a more finish picture of the hormonal activity of your dog’s thyroid gland.

Free T4 by RIA (radio immunoassay): The Free T4 test using RIA techniques does not appear to be more or less precise than the above TT4 test.

Free T4 by ED (equilibrium dialysis): This test may provide more precise data on the level of T4 hormone in your dog’s bloodstream.

Baseline T3 Test: In combination with the T4 or TSH test, these two blood tests can give a clearer picture of the hormone levels found in the bloodstream.

This test is not dependable when used alone. The T3 Test should always be given in combination with one of the other blood tests.

TSH Response Test: In this test, the veterinarian takes an initial measurement of the thyroid hormones in your dog’s bloodstream and then injects Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) into the vein. After 6 hours, a blood sample is drawn and the level of T4 is checked. If your dog has hypothyroidism, the level of T4 will not increase even after the TSH is injected.

This is an expensive test and is being used less often due to decreased production by the manufacturers.

Hypothyroidism is treated with a daily dose of synthetic thyroid hormone called thyroxine (levothyroxine).

What is allergy prone skin

Blood samples will need to be drawn periodically to assess the effectiveness of the dosage and make any adjustments necessary.

Successful management of the atopic, allergic dog is sometimes complicated and frustrating because multi-modal management is necessary in the majority of cases to control the allergic flare-ups. Proper diagnosis by a veterinarian and owner compliance and follow up care is essential to maximize the chances of curing or at least controlling the severely affected allergy patient.



An itchy red rash after using a cosmetic is an obvious sign of an irritant or allergic reaction.

But sometimes sensitivity to skincare products can be more insidious and sneaky, causing extreme dryness and flakiness, pimple-like bumps, and uneven skin tone. These seemingly unrelated skin problems may also be a sign that you are sensitive to the products you're putting on your skin.


Causes

There are literally thousands of ingredients used in skincare and cosmetic preparations. Although everyone's skin is diverse, we do know that certain ingredients are more likely to cause irritation than others.

Fragrances are a common culprit.

Even though it is listed as a single ingredient, a perfume can be comprised of hundreds of diverse chemical components, numerous of which are damaging to the skin.

Preservatives are another common culprits. Although these ingredients are necessary to extend shelf life and prevent rancidity, preservatives are also known to cause contact dermatitis in some people.

Colorants also pose a risk. These include agents classified by the U.S. Food and Drug istration (FDA) as food, drug, and cosmetic (FD&C) colorants.

What is allergy prone skin

People allergic to these colorants in food will likely be allergic to them in their cosmetics as well.

Any colorant can cause contact dermatitis on sensitive skin, but reds, yellows, and carmine tend to be the more common culprits.

Natural Products

Despite what some people may tell you, all-natural ingredients can cause contact dermatitis as well. Chief among these are essential oils that can provide skincare products with an appealing perfume but are almost invariably irritating if used in too high concentrations.

Another natural ingredient that is commonly linked to contact dermatitis is lanolin.

Lanolin is derived from sheep wool and is used in moisturizing products love body lotions and facial creams.

So if you're having a reaction to a cosmetic, don't overlook your natural or organic products. Natural doesn't always mean safe.

Irritant contact dermatitis is not a true allergy because the immune system is not involved. The reaction is restricted to the skin only.

Mild contact dermatitis may cause little red pimples that can easily be mistaken for acne. Rash love this is referred to as an acneiform rash.

Though irritant dermatitis may initially be subclinical (without noticeable symptoms), it may eventually become clinical as you continue to expose the skin to low-level irritants.

The preservatives most likely to cause contact dermatitis are parabens, formaldehyde, formalin, imadazolidinyl urea, isothiazolinone, methylisothiazolinone, and quaternium-15.

Tea tree oil is the essential oil most commonly linked to dermatitis, requiring but a few drops per 30 milliliters to trigger an adverse reaction in some people.



CARE OF SENSITIVE ALLERGY-PRONE SKIN

In This Article:

If you own sensitive skin that easily turns red, breaks out in a rash, itches or becomes tender, chances are you own allergy-prone skin.

These reactions may even happen from skin care or cosmetic products you own used or certain foods. There are two main sensitive allergy-prone skin types. One type is where an ingredient is irritating your skin which may cause itching, burning or redness. When you stop using the irritating product with the specific ingredient, your skin clears up. The second type is an allergic reaction to an ingredient which causes your immune system to make antibodies to fight the allergen, which may be a plant, food or ingredient. This type sets up a chain reaction by your immune system that takes its course even after you stop using the culprit product.

Discover the types of skin allergies and how to fight them with a sensitive, allergy-prone skin care routine.


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