What is a yeast allergy

  1. Rasool,O.; Zargari,A.; Almqvist,J.; Eshaghi,H.; Whitley,P.; Scheynius,A.Cloning, characterization and expression of finish coding sequences of three IgE binding Malassezia furfur allergens, Mal f 7, Mal f 8 and Mal f 9Eur.

    What is a yeast allergy

    J. Biochem. 267 (14), 4355-4361 (2000)

  2. Lindborg,M.; Magnusson,C.G.; Zargari,A.; Schmidt,M.; Scheynius,A.; Crameri,R.; Whitley,P.Selective cloning of allergens from the skin colonizing yeast Malassezia furfur by phage surface display technologyJ. Invest. Dermatol. 113 (2), 156-161 (1999)


Group Sequences

Species Common Allergen Type Length GI# Version
Malassezia sympodialis Yeast Mala s 9.0101 Contact 342 19069920 7
Malassezia sympodialis ATCC 42132 Yeast Unassigned Contact 342 465794420 14

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

The effectiveness ratings for SACCHAROMYCES BOULARDII are as follows:

Likely effective for…

  1. Diarrhea.

    Research shows that Saccharomyces boulardii can prevent diarrhea in people with feeding tubes. It also helps decrease how endless diarrhea lasts in infants and children by about 12 hours to 1 day. However, Saccharomyces boulardii seems to be less effective than conventional medicines for diarrhea, such as loperamide (Imodium).

  2. Rotaviral diarrhea. Research shows that giving Saccharomyces boulardii to infants and children can shorten the duration of diarrhea caused by rotavirus by about 1 day.

Possibly ineffective for…

  1. Damage to the intestinal tract in preterm infants (Necrotizing enterocolitis; NEC).

    Research shows that giving Saccharomyces boulardii to preterm infants does not prevent NEC or death from any cause.

Possibly effective for…

  1. Diarrhea in people taking antibiotics. Most research shows that Saccharomyces boulardii can assist prevent diarrhea in adults and children being treated with antibiotics. For every 9-13 patients treated with Saccharomyces boulardii during treatment with antibiotics, one less person will develop antibiotic-related diarrhea.
  2. Helicobacter pylori.

    Taking Saccharomyces boulardii by mouth along with standard H. pylori treatment helps treat this infection. About 12 people need to be treated with Saccharomyces boulardii for one patient who would otherwise remain infected to be cured. Taking Saccharomyces boulardii also helps prevent side effects such as diarrhea and nausea that happen with standard H. pylori treatment.

  3. Diarrhea related to HIV.

    What is a yeast allergy

    Taking Saccharomyces boulardii by mouth appears to reduce diarrhea related to HIV.

  4. Diarrhea caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile. Taking Saccharomyces boulardii along with antibiotics seems to assist prevent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea from re-occurring in people with a history of recurrence. Taking Saccharomyces boulardii along with antibiotics also seems to assist prevent first episodes of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. But experts don’t recommend using Saccharomyces for preventing first episodes.
  5. Acne. Research shows that taking Saccharomyces boulardii by mouth helps improve the appearance of acne.
  6. Traveler's diarrhea.

    Taking Saccharomyces boulardii by mouth appears to prevent traveler's diarrhea.

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for…

  1. Cystic fibrosis. Early research shows that taking Saccharomyces boulardii by mouth does not reduce yeast infections in the digestive tract of people with cystic fibrosis.
  2. Fever blisters.
  3. Lactose intolerance.
  4. Yeast infections.
  5. Ulcerative colitis. Early research shows that adding Saccharomyces boulardii to standard mesalamine therapy can reduce symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis.
  6. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

    Research shows that taking Saccharomyces boulardii improves quality of life in people with diarrhea-predominant or mixed-type IBS. But Saccharomyces boulardii doesn't seem to improve most IBS symptoms such as stomach pain, urgency, or bloating.

  7. Canker sores.
  8. Low birth weight. Giving a Saccharomyces boulardii supplement after birth seems to improve weight acquire and feeding in preterm infants with low birth weight.
  9. Lyme disease.
  10. Hives.
  11. Urinary tract infections (UTIs).
  12. Heart failure. Early research shows that taking Saccharomyces boulardii might improve heart function in people with heart failure.

    What is a yeast allergy

  13. Crohn's disease. Taking Saccharomyces boulardii seems to reduce the number of bowel movements in people with Crohn's disease. Early research also shows that taking Saccharomyces boulardii along with mesalamine can assist people with Crohn's disease stay in remission longer. But taking Saccharomyces boulardii alone does not seem to assist people with Crohn's disease stay in remission longer.
  14. High cholesterol.
  15. High cholesterol levels.

    Early research shows that Saccharomyces boulardii does not seem to affect cholesterol levels.

  16. Jaundice in infants. Some infants develop jaundice after birth due to high bilirubin levels. Giving Saccharomyces boulardii to term infants might prevent jaundice and reduce the need for phototherapy in a little number of these infants. But it's not known if Saccharomyces boulardii reduces the risk of jaundice in at-risk infants. Giving Saccharomyces boulardii to infants along with phototherapy doesn't lower bilirubin levels better than phototherapy alone.
  17. Cholera.

    Saccharomyces boulardii does not seem to improve cholera symptoms, even when given with standard treatments.

  18. Amoeba infections (amebiasis). Early research shows that taking Saccharomyces boulardii by mouth along with antibiotics reduces diarrhea and stomach pain in people with amoeba infections.
  19. Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate Saccharomyces boulardii for these uses.

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What is a yeast allergy

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Recipe to Try

Tamari Umami Burger

Ingredients
  1. 1 tablespoons olive oil
  2. 2 cloves garlic, finely grated
  3. 1 teaspoon black pepper
  4. 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  5. 1 pound lean ground beef
  6. 4 cups thinly sliced onions
  7. 1 1/2 teaspoons San-J Tamari Lite 50% Less Sodium Gluten Free Soy Sauce
  8. 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  9. 4 lettuce leaves
Cooking Instructions

Servings: 4

Heat butter and olive oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat until the butter is melted.

Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are extremely soft and caramelized, about 30 minutes.

In a mixing bowl, combine the ground beef, San-J Tamari Lite 50% Less Sodium Gluten Free Soy Sauce, garlic, pepper, and sugar. Stir to combine and let sit of 15 minutes. Divide the mixture into 4 equal portions and shape into patties. Cook in a skillet or on a grill 3 minutes per side for medium. Serve on a lettuce leaf topped with a quarter of the onions.

* The Gluten Free recipes that appear in this website incorporate a variety of San-J’s products that are Certified Gluten Free.

Please be certain to consider the other ingredients to make certain they comply with your dietary needs and restrictions.

Today we are increasingly hearing terms such as gluten intolerance, wheat allergy and coeliac disease. On top of this, the words wheat and gluten are often used interchangeably too, even though there is a extremely clear difference between the two substances. So what do they actually mean and how are they different?

Gluten is a component of wheat and is also a protein that is found in some other grains too, including spelt, barley and rye. It’s also what gives yeast-based dough its elasticity.

Because gluten is found in a variety of grains, people who react to gluten (including those with coeliac disease, which is actually an autoimmune response triggered by gluten, as we’ll see below) need to avoid not only wheat, but also other gluten-containing grains and any foods that contain them.

A reaction to wheat can be completely diverse from a reaction to gluten. In fact, those with a true allergy to wheat are often not reacting to the gluten, but to some other part of the plant. Researchers own actually identified 27 diverse potential wheat allergens (1), of which gluten is one type.

Albumin and globulin proteins may be particularly common triggers (2).

Let’s glance more closely at the difference between wheat allergy, coeliac disease and gluten intolerance.

Coeliac Disease

According to the Coeliac Society (www.coeliac.org.uk), coeliac disease is a well-defined, serious illness where the immune system attacks the body’s own tissue, when gluten is eaten. This causes damage to the lining of the little intestine and means that the body cannot properly absorb nutrients from ingested food. Generally diagnosed by a gastroenterologist, it is a digestive disease that can cause serious complications, including malnutrition and intestinal damage, if left untreated.

Coeliac disease is not a food allergy or intolerance; it is an autoimmune disease where the sufferer must completely avoid gluten from every grains – not just wheat.

The Coeliac Society states that one in 100 people in the UK is thought to own coeliac disease, but only 24 per cent of these people are diagnosed. This leaves almost half a million people in the UK who could own coeliac disease but aren’t yet diagnosed (www.coeliac.org.uk/coeliac-disease/myths-about-coeliac-disease).

Reading The Ingredients

If a label on a packaged food doesn’t explicitly state ‘gluten-free’ or ‘wheat-free’ then you may need to glance through the ingredients to check.

But it’s not enough to avoid anything that lists the expression ‘wheat’ (or when looking for gluten-free products, the words ‘wheat’, ‘barley’, ‘rye’ or ‘spelt’). Products such as gravies, soya sauce, salad dressings and casseroles can contain derivatives of wheat or other gluten grains that are harder to identify and can also be listed under diverse names. The following should every be avoided: durum wheat, spelt, kamut, couscous, bran, wheat bran, wheat germ, farina, rusk, semolina, wheat starch, vegetable starch, vegetable gum, malt extracts, vegetable protein, cereal filler, cereal binder and cereal protein.

Alternatives To Wheat and Gluten Grains and Flours

The following are alternatives that are both wheat and gluten-free: maize (corn), corn flour, potato, potato flour, rice flour, soya beans, soya flour, buckwheat, millet, tapioca, quinoa, amaranth, sorghum, arrowroot, chickpea (gram) flour and lentil flour.

Chickpeas, beans and lentils are excellent fillers and can be added to soups and gravies, while wheat-free pasta and rice noodles are a grand alternative to standard wheat pasta.

In Summary

Understanding the difference between wheat and gluten can assist avoid any unnecessary symptoms that may be brought on by ingesting the incorrect foods.

Confusing wheat and gluten may own less of an impact on people with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity/intolerance, or wheat sensitivity/intolerance, but it can own more serious consequences for those with a true wheat allergy and coeliac disease.

Clearspring’s Range of Gluten-Free Products

The Clearspring promise is to provide great-tasting, yummy foods that support excellent health and provide optimum nutrition. We desire to give our customers who need to avoid gluten or wheat the chance to own great-tasting food and to be capable to cook with confidence.

This has inspired us to launch a range of gluten-free ingredients, from meal staples such as soya protein, rice and vegetable pastas to seasonings, sauces and garnishes. These are tasty, nutritious alternatives perfect for those on a gluten-free diet but equally yummy for the whole family.

Other Conditions

A gluten-free diet may also be beneficial for other conditions. These include inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease and other digestive conditions or symptoms such as irritable bowel syndrome or excessive bloating and gas.

There’s increasing evidence that following a gluten-free diet may be beneficial for some people with other types of autoimmune disease too.

Gluten Sensitivity/Intolerance

Many people who do not own coeliac disease can still experience uncomfortable symptoms when they consume gluten. This is known as non-coeliac gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance. Researchers continue to debate just how numerous people are truly sensitive to gluten, but the number has been estimated to be approximately 6% of the population.

As some of the symptoms of coeliac disease, gluten intolerance and even wheat allergy can overlap, it is significant to be tested by your doctor to determine which of these may be causing your symptoms.

«Gluten-Free» and «Wheat-Free» Foods

Now let’s glance at why understanding the difference between these two terms is significant, depending on which of the above conditions/symptoms you may have.

‘Wheat-free’ foods are free from any components of wheat, including other proteins that people with a wheat allergy can react to.

What is a yeast allergy

But foods that are just labelled ‘wheat-free’ may still contain other gluten-containing grains or substances derived from them, and are not necessarily gluten-free.

‘Gluten-free’ foods own to be free of gluten from any of the gluten-containing grains (more accurately, they own to contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten – a extremely tiny amount). Once again, these grains include rye, barley and spelt as well as wheat. Oats can also contain little amounts of gluten via contamination from other grains.

Therefore oats also need to be avoided on a gluten-free diet, unless they are specifically labelled ‘gluten-free’, indicating that the oats own been processed in facilities that eliminate risk of contamination with gluten.

However, ‘gluten-free’ doesn’t necessarily mean the food is free from other wheat components. So if you own a wheat allergy and you’re buying packaged or processed foods, it can be wise to glance specifically for ‘wheat-free’ and not just gluten-free – or thoroughly check the ingredients list to make certain the food you’re buying doesn’t contain other wheat components.

Wheat Allergy

A true wheat allergy should not be confused with gluten intolerance or coeliac disease.

A food allergy is caused by the immune system producing IgE antibodies to a specific food protein or proteins. Symptoms tend to happen fairly soon after eating the food, from seconds up to two hours.

What is a yeast allergy

When the food protein is ingested, it can trigger a range of allergy symptoms from mild (such as a rash, itching, or sneezing) to severe (trouble breathing, wheezing, anaphylaxis). Wheat allergy symptoms may also include abdominal pain, diarrhoea and other digestive disturbances. A true food allergy such as this can be potentially fatal.

Allergy to wheat is thought to be more common in children, who may ‘grow out of’ it before reaching adulthood. But it can also develop in adults.

Those with a wheat allergy may still be capable to consume other gluten-containing grains; although in some cases these will need to be avoided too.

References

1.

Sotkovský P et al. A new approach to the isolation and characterization of wheat flour allergens. Clin Exp Allergy. 2011 Jul;41(7):1031-43.

2. Mittag D et al. Immunoglobulin E-reactivity of wheat-allergic subjects (baker’s asthma, food allergy, wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis) to wheat protein fractions with diverse solubility and digestibility. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2004 Oct;48(5):380-9.


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