What is a sulphate allergy

Food Intolerance

  1. A food intolerance is often a more delayed reaction, generally occurring hours or even days after eating certain foods
  2. Lactose intolerance is an example, where there is a lack of or a reduced quantity of the enzyme which is needed for lactose digestion
  3. Food intolerance is any adverse response that happens each time a food is eaten
  4. Food intolerance symptoms often involve the digestive tract and include pain and colic, bloating, wind, diarrhoea and sometimes vomiting

Recommendations for children considered at higher risk of developing food allergy

Children with a family history of allergy are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy, and there are certain recommendations that include:

  1. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life
  2. Weaning foods to be introduced one at a time with a period of at least one day between new foods so that symptoms can be monitored

Allergy or intolerance to cows’ milk

  1. If cows’ milk is causing symptoms in your kid, it is significant to determine whether it is the protein or the lactose (a milk sugar) which is causing the problem, as this will determine the type of dietary restrictions they will need
  2. Symptoms of the two can be similar and include eczema or rashes, diarrhoea, vomiting and stomach cramps.

    What is a sulphate allergy

    Lactose intolerance will not produce hives or breathing difficulties

  3. Children can react to cows’ milk, baby formula based on cows’ milk, or even breast milk if cows’ milk or dairy products own been consumed by the mother
  4. A lactose intolerance will not show up in conventional allergy testing love a skin prick test or blood test

Food Allergy

  1. The most common symptoms of a food allergy are irritation of the skin and eyes, swellings around the eyes, mouth and tongue, sneezing and blocked or runny noses, shortness of breath and coughing, abdominal pains, diarrhoea and vomiting
  2. Around 5-8 % of children will develop a true food allergy and up to 90% of children will grow out of these allergies, often by five years of age.

    They may however go on to develop other allergy related conditions, such as asthma, eczema, hay fever or rhinitis, later in life

  3. A food allergy involves the immune system and often causes an immediate reaction after consumption of the food allergen (something in the food that causes an allergic reaction)
  4. The foods that most commonly cause food allergies are; eggs, cows’ milk, nuts, wheat, fish, shellfish, peanuts and soya

What are they and what to do if you suspect your kid has one

The prevalence of allergies has increased greatly over the final two decades, although experts are still trying to discover exactly why

  1. Children are more at risk of developing an allergy if they own a parent or shut relative that has asthma, eczema, hay fever or food allergy
  2. Cows’ milk protein allergy is the most common food allergy in children, as cow’s milk is the major food that a bottle-fed kid is given.

Many mums worry about their children reacting to the foods they give them or developing an allergy.

Allergy and intolerance are two distinct conditions and should not be confused.

If you suspect your kid has a food allergy or intolerance

It is really significant that if you suspect that your kid has had an adverse reaction to a food, you should seek professional medical advice. If an allergy or intolerance is diagnosed you will then be given assist to formulate a suitable diet for your kid which ensures that their diet continues to meet their nutritional needs.

What is a Food Allergy? There Are Diverse Types of Allergic Reactions to Foods



Food Allergies

Toddler |

How dangerous is a food allergy?

Allergic reactions can be serious.

Seek medical assistance immediately if your child

  1. Develops swelling in the head and neck
  2. Has generalized hives (smooth red swellings that itch, burn, or sting)
  3. Has bloody diarrhoea
  4. Has trouble breathing or turns blue
  5. Is extremely pale or weak

Even if your kid does not show any of these severe symptoms, you should consult your health care professional soon if you suspect that your kid has an allergy.

What is the difference between an adverse reaction to a food and a true food allergy?

With a food allergy, the body’s immune system mistakenly tries to defend against certain food proteins as if they were invading germs.

With an adverse reaction to a food, although symptoms may be similar to those of an allergy, the immune system is not involved.

In either case, it is generally recommended that the problem food be eliminated from the diet.

Can food allergies be prevented?

Delaying the introduction of highly allergenic foods may assist.

If a kid has a family history of allergies, it is best not to introduce cow’s milk, soy, wheat, corn, and citrus until after the first birthday.

If I am allergic to a food, will my kid be allergic, too?

If a parent or sibling is allergic to a food, your kid may be more likely to develop an allergy. However, you may increase the chances of preventing a food allergy if you eliminate the offending food from your toddler’s diet.

What are the most common food allergies and food intolerances?

The food allergies most common among young children are those to cow’s milk, soy, egg whites, wheat, and citrus.

Any food has the potential to trigger an allergy, though.

Lactose intolerance and gluten intolerance are 2 of the most common types of food intolerances. Children can also own intolerance to food additives, such as monosodium glutamate, nitrates, nitrites, sulphites, and dyes.

What are the symptoms of a food allergy?

Diarrhoea and vomiting are the most common symptoms. Skin rashes, itching, runny nose, wheezing, tightness in the throat, and swelling of the lips, tongue, or mouth may also occur.

Symptoms may appear within a few minutes or take as endless as 48 hours to appear.

As a general law, if symptoms are triggered by an allergy, your kid won’t own a fever.

Will my kid own her food allergy or intolerance for life?

It depends.

About half of every children who develop a food allergy before age 3 eventually outgrow it, generally by about age 7 years.

Children who develop an allergy after age 3 years are less likely to outgrow it.

Allergies to nuts and shellfish are more likely to persist for life. Also, intolerances such as wheat sensitivity in celiac disease are lifelong conditions.

How is an allergy diagnosed?

Generally, the suspect food is eliminated from the diet for 2 weeks to see if symptoms lessen.

If the cause of symptoms is not clear, skin or blood tests may be performed.

What is food intolerance?

Food intolerance is an abnormal but non-allergic reaction to a food.

With food intolerance, a person generally does not make enough of a certain enzyme needed to digest some part of a food.

How prevalent are food allergies?

True food allergies are fairly rare. However, about one-third of children may own an adverse reaction to a food, which may be mistaken for a food allergy.

What is a food allergy?

Food allergies happen when the body’s immune system reacts to a protein in a specific food. When exposed to the food, the body produces antibodies to the protein. Once enough antibodies build up, an exposure to the food will trigger allergic symptoms.

How can I tell whether my kid had outgrown her food allergy?

If you desire to test, a food challenge should only be performed under your doctor’s supervision in his office.

Never attempt a food challenge yourself at home.


If your kid has symptoms after eating certain foods, he or she may own a food allergy.

A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a certain food as harmful and reacts by causing symptoms. This is an allergic reaction. Foods that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  2. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  3. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.
  4. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen
  5. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  6. Skin rash, itching, hives
  7. Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food.

    This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody. Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine.

This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods. For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish.

Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods.

What is a sulphate allergy

For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods. Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas.

That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue.

What is a sulphate allergy

Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Two Categories of Food Allergies

  • Class II recalls include situations where exposure to the violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is rare.
  • Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food. This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody.

    Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.

  • Class I recalls are the most serious and involve situations where there is a reasonable probability that exposure to the violative product will cause serious adverse health consequences or deaths. FDA is aware of deaths occurring among sulfite-sensitive asthmatics.
  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies.

    These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.

  • Class III recalls includes situations where exposure to the violative product is not likely to cause adverse health consequences.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed.

In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist.

Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful.

Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy.

It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow.

Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk. This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools.

Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December 2014.

Below is a table with our sausages and their ingredients. You will discover a key to the allergens under too.

Allergens:
Sulphites (preservative) S Wheat Gluten (rusks) WG Mustard M
Milk- MI Eggs- E Soya- SO
Celery- C Sesame- SE Nuts- N
Peanuts- P Fish- F Peanuts
Additives:
Antioxidant A
Preservative ( Sulphites/ sulphur dioxide SO2) P
Flavour Enhancer (Glutamates eg MSG) F
Colouring E120 (Cochineal) C
Sausages % Meats Allergens Alcohol
International Sausages – Gluten Free
Toulouse 89% pork S
Fresh Chorizos 69%pork,22%beef S,MI,
Merguez 66% lamb, 22% pork S
Italian Piccante 91% Pork S White Wine
Sicilian 91% Pork S White Wine
Boerewors S
Bratwurst 79% pork S
Weisswurst 14%/beef, 37% pork S
Specialist Sausages
Whisky, Hog & Wild Thyme 72% Pork S,WG Whisky
Pork, Leek & Fennel 68% Pork, leek 4% S,WG
Pork & Edinburgh Ale 71% Pork S,WG Ale
Summer Sizzlers 71% Pork S,WG,M
Pork, Honey & Mustard 70% pork S, WG, M
Piggy Black 65% pork,7% B/Pud M,S,WG
Pork & Leek with Ginger 68% Pork S,WG
Mediterranean Pork 65%Pork S,WG
Pork, Whisky & Marmalade 72% pork WG,S Whisky
Pork & Caramelised Onion 69% Pork S,WG
Pork, Spicy Mango & Ginger 71% Pork S,WG
Sweet Chilli Dragon 71% Pork S,WG
Pork, leek, pancetta & cheese 67% pork, 9% cheese,4% pancetta WG, S Cheddar cheese
Celebration Sausage (Bucks Fizz) 74% Pork WG, S, Bucks Fizz
Poughman’s Pork – Deli only 62% Pork WG, S, Mi Cheddar Cheese
BBQ Chicken 47% chicken, 27% pork WG, S, F anchovies
Cock-a- Leekie 46% chicken, 26% pork WG, S, C
Rum & Ale Pork Sausage 71% pork, 6% Ale WG, S, Ale
Pork, pear & parmesan 70% Pork S, WG, MI Cheese
Pork Apple, Leek & sage 70% Pork S, WG
All with beef of lamb
Lucifer’s Matchsticks 68% Beef S,WG,M
Wine Merchants 61% Beef S,WG,MI,M R/Wine ,Cheese
Auld Reekie 31% Beef 33% Pork S,WG,
Lamb, Rosemary & Garlic 71% Lamb S,WG
All gluten free
Venison, Redcurrant & Basil 58% Venis 38% Pork S Red Wine
Boerewors(new seas) S
Bratwurst(see above) 79% pork S
Weisswurst (see above) Pork 36%, Veal 14% S
Regional
Irish Pork 81% Pork S,WG
Cumberland Style Coil 85% Pork S,WG
The One O’clock Banger 69% pork WG,S,M,,MI,C
The Broughton Banger 81% pork S,WG
Traditional
Special Pork 72% Pork S,WG
Pork Chipolatas 72% Pork S,WG
Farmers Pork 74% Pork S,WG,C
Prime Steak 61% Beef S,WG
Grandad’s Beef 68% Beef S,WG
Beef Lorne Slicing 65% Beef S,WG

Uses:

The European Baseline Series consists of haptens based on the experience from numerous years of studies of frequencies of contact allergy performed by the European Environmental and Contact Dermatitis Research Group (EECDRG).
The series can be seen as a basic "standard" baseline series in case no specific country specific baseline series is offered.

Click here for hapten information in Russian.

Art.No Name Conc
1. P-014A Potassium dichromate 0.5% pet
2. P-006 p-PHENYLENEDIAMINE (PPD) 1.0% pet
3. Mx-01 Thiuram stir 1.0% pet
4. N-001 Neomycin sulfate 20.0% pet
5.

C-017A Cobalt(II)chloride hexahydrate 1.0% pet
6. Mx-19 Caine stir III 10.0% pet
7. N-002A Nickel(II)sulfate hexahydrate 5.0% pet
8. H-010 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate 2.0% pet
9. C-020 COLOPHONIUM 20.0% pet
10.

Mx-03C Paraben stir 16.0% pet
11. I-004 N-Isopropyl-N-phenyl-4-phenylenediamine (IPPD) 0.1% pet
12. W-001 LANOLIN ALCOHOL 30.0% pet
13. Mx-05A Mercapto stir 2.0% pet
14.

E-002 Epoxy resin, Bisphenol A 1.0% pet
15. B-001 Peru balsam 25.0% pet
16. B-024 4-tert-Butylphenolformaldehyde resin (PTBP) 1.0% pet
17. M-003A 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) 2.0% pet
18. F-002B FORMALDEHYDE 2.0% aq
19.

Mx-07 Fragrance stir I 8.0% pet
20.

What is a sulphate allergy

Mx-18 Sesquiterpene lactone stir 0.1% pet
21. C-007A QUATERNIUM-15 1.0% pet
22. P-022 Propolis 10.0% pet
23.

What is a sulphate allergy

C-009B METHYLISOTHIAZOLINONE+ METHYLCHLOROISOTHIAZOLINONE 0.02% aq
24. B-033B Budesonide 0.01% pet
25. T-031B Tixocortol-21-pivalate 0.1% pet
26. D-049E METHYLDIBROMO GLUTARONITRILE 0.5% pet
27.

Mx-25 Fragrance stir II 14.0% pet
28. L-003 HYDROXYISOHEXYL 3-CYCLOHEXENE CARBOXALDEHYDE 5.0% pet
29. M-035B METHYLISOTHIAZOLINONE 0.2% aq
30. Mx-30 Textile dye stir 6.6% pet

Sulfur dioxide (SO2), sodium bisulfite (NaHSO3), potassium metabisulfite (KHSO3), sodium metabisulfite (Na2S2O5), potassium metabisulfite (K2S2O5), and sodium sulfite (Na2SO3) are allowed as food ingredients in the U.S.

These substances are considered as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe).

The U.S. Foodand Drug istration (FDA) requires that the presence of sulfites be declared on food labels when used as an ingredient in the food and also when used as a processing aid or when present in an ingredient used in the food (e.g. dried fruit pieces). Sulfites must be declared in these cases when the concentration in the food is ≥10 ppm entire SO2.

[21 CFR 101.100 (a)(4) «For the purposes of paragraph (a)(3) of this section, any sulfiting agent (sulfur dioxide, sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfite, potassium bisulfite, sodium metabisulfite, and potassium metabisulfite) that has been added to any food or to any ingredient in any food and that has no technical effect in that food will be considered to be present in an insignificant quantity only if no detectable quantity of the agent is present in the finished food. A detectable quantity of sulfiting agent is 10 parts per million or more of the sulfite in the finished food.»] If naturally occurring sulfites also exists in foods, it would contribute to the analytical result.

Basically, if the food contains≥ 10 ppm entire SO2, then sulfite must be declared on the label. This will most typically happen when sulfite is deliberately added to the food. The specific name of the additive (e.g. sodium bisulfite) must be declared in the case of use as an intentional ingredient.

Sulfites are also prohibited from certain uses in the U.S. Sulfites may not be used in products such as meats that serve as a excellent source of vitamin B1 because sulfites can scavenge that vitamin from foods. In 1986, following the identification of numerous cases of sulfite-induced asthma occurring on ingestion of green or fruit salads treated with sulfites, FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables intended to be served raw or presented unused to the public (Fed.

Regist. 51:25021-25026, 1986). The only exception is sulfite use on minimally processed potatoes sliced or shredded for frying where sulfite use is still permitted (although FDA has a long-standing, though never finalized, proposal to ban that use also). Sulfite use as a fungicide during the shipment of unused table grapes is regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, but the concentration of SO2 residues on the table grapes as consumed must be <10 ppm entire SO2.

The labeling of the presence of sulfites on alcoholic beverages is under the jurisdiction of the Taxand Trade Bureau (TTB) of the U.S.

Dept. of Treasury. While most ingredients in alcoholic beverages are not declared on the container, the presence of sulfites must be declared. Sulfites are commonly used in wine fermentation to control undesirable growth of acid-producing bacteria while allowing alcohol-producing yeast to proliferate.

Total SO2 levels in foods and beverages should be sure by the optimized Monier-Williams distillation-titration procedure, a method approved by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC).

Alternate methods do exist but FDA and other federal agencies will typically use the AOAC method so any alternative method must provide similar results.

Food products that contain undeclared sulfites at levels above 10 ppm entire SO2 will be subject to potential recall actions. In the U.S., three recall categories are used:

  1. Class II recalls include situations where exposure to the violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is rare.
  2. Class I recalls are the most serious and involve situations where there is a reasonable probability that exposure to the violative product will cause serious adverse health consequences or deaths.

    FDA is aware of deaths occurring among sulfite-sensitive asthmatics.

  3. Class III recalls includes situations where exposure to the violative product is not likely to cause adverse health consequences.

For sulfites, recalls can drop into any of the 3 recall classifications. Using data from controlled oral clinical challenges of sulfite-sensitive asthmatics, the FDA has established dose levels that are associated with Class I, Class II, or Class III recalls. Analysis is done for entire SO2 based upon the AOAC procedure. The analytical result is given in terms of a concentration (ppm). FDA determines a worst case dose (mg SO2 equivalents) by using the 95th percentile level of consumption of the food in question.

Dose estimates are based upon single occasion exposures. The estimated 95th percentile sulfite ingestion dose (in mg) for a single occasion is then obtained by multiplying the sulfite concentration of the food product (in ppm or mg per kg of food) by the 95th percentile level of food consumption (in kg) for the specific food.

Class Est. 95th Percentile Dose
Class I ≥10 mg
Class II 3.7 — 9.9 mg
Class III < 3.7 mg

Timbo B, Koehler KM, Wolyniak C, Klontz KC.

2004. Sulfites — a Foodand Drug istration review of recalls and reported adverse events. J Food Prot 67:1806-1811.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed.

In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction.

If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire.

Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants.

Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital.

The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk. This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools.

Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December 2014.

Below is a table with our sausages and their ingredients.

What is a sulphate allergy

You will discover a key to the allergens under too.

Allergens:
Sulphites (preservative) S Wheat Gluten (rusks) WG Mustard M
Milk- MI Eggs- E Soya- SO
Celery- C Sesame- SE Nuts- N
Peanuts- P Fish- F Peanuts
Additives:
Antioxidant A
Preservative ( Sulphites/ sulphur dioxide SO2) P
Flavour Enhancer (Glutamates eg MSG) F
Colouring E120 (Cochineal) C
Sausages % Meats Allergens Alcohol
International Sausages – Gluten Free
Toulouse 89% pork S
Fresh Chorizos 69%pork,22%beef S,MI,
Merguez 66% lamb, 22% pork S
Italian Piccante 91% Pork S White Wine
Sicilian 91% Pork S White Wine
Boerewors S
Bratwurst 79% pork S
Weisswurst 14%/beef, 37% pork S
Specialist Sausages
Whisky, Hog & Wild Thyme 72% Pork S,WG Whisky
Pork, Leek & Fennel 68% Pork, leek 4% S,WG
Pork & Edinburgh Ale 71% Pork S,WG Ale
Summer Sizzlers 71% Pork S,WG,M
Pork, Honey & Mustard 70% pork S, WG, M
Piggy Black 65% pork,7% B/Pud M,S,WG
Pork & Leek with Ginger 68% Pork S,WG
Mediterranean Pork 65%Pork S,WG
Pork, Whisky & Marmalade 72% pork WG,S Whisky
Pork & Caramelised Onion 69% Pork S,WG
Pork, Spicy Mango & Ginger 71% Pork S,WG
Sweet Chilli Dragon 71% Pork S,WG
Pork, leek, pancetta & cheese 67% pork, 9% cheese,4% pancetta WG, S Cheddar cheese
Celebration Sausage (Bucks Fizz) 74% Pork WG, S, Bucks Fizz
Poughman’s Pork – Deli only 62% Pork WG, S, Mi Cheddar Cheese
BBQ Chicken 47% chicken, 27% pork WG, S, F anchovies
Cock-a- Leekie 46% chicken, 26% pork WG, S, C
Rum & Ale Pork Sausage 71% pork, 6% Ale WG, S, Ale
Pork, pear & parmesan 70% Pork S, WG, MI Cheese
Pork Apple, Leek & sage 70% Pork S, WG
All with beef of lamb
Lucifer’s Matchsticks 68% Beef S,WG,M
Wine Merchants 61% Beef S,WG,MI,M R/Wine ,Cheese
Auld Reekie 31% Beef 33% Pork S,WG,
Lamb, Rosemary & Garlic 71% Lamb S,WG
All gluten free
Venison, Redcurrant & Basil 58% Venis 38% Pork S Red Wine
Boerewors(new seas) S
Bratwurst(see above) 79% pork S
Weisswurst (see above) Pork 36%, Veal 14% S
Regional
Irish Pork 81% Pork S,WG
Cumberland Style Coil 85% Pork S,WG
The One O’clock Banger 69% pork WG,S,M,,MI,C
The Broughton Banger 81% pork S,WG
Traditional
Special Pork 72% Pork S,WG
Pork Chipolatas 72% Pork S,WG
Farmers Pork 74% Pork S,WG,C
Prime Steak 61% Beef S,WG
Grandad’s Beef 68% Beef S,WG
Beef Lorne Slicing 65% Beef S,WG

Uses:

The European Baseline Series consists of haptens based on the experience from numerous years of studies of frequencies of contact allergy performed by the European Environmental and Contact Dermatitis Research Group (EECDRG).
The series can be seen as a basic "standard" baseline series in case no specific country specific baseline series is offered.

Click here for hapten information in Russian.

Art.No Name Conc
1. P-014A Potassium dichromate 0.5% pet
2. P-006 p-PHENYLENEDIAMINE (PPD) 1.0% pet
3. Mx-01 Thiuram stir 1.0% pet
4. N-001 Neomycin sulfate 20.0% pet
5.

C-017A Cobalt(II)chloride hexahydrate 1.0% pet
6. Mx-19 Caine stir III 10.0% pet
7. N-002A Nickel(II)sulfate hexahydrate 5.0% pet
8. H-010 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate 2.0% pet
9. C-020 COLOPHONIUM 20.0% pet
10.

Mx-03C Paraben stir 16.0% pet
11.

What is a sulphate allergy

I-004 N-Isopropyl-N-phenyl-4-phenylenediamine (IPPD) 0.1% pet
12. W-001 LANOLIN ALCOHOL 30.0% pet
13. Mx-05A Mercapto stir 2.0% pet
14. E-002 Epoxy resin, Bisphenol A 1.0% pet
15. B-001 Peru balsam 25.0% pet
16.

B-024 4-tert-Butylphenolformaldehyde resin (PTBP) 1.0% pet
17. M-003A 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) 2.0% pet
18. F-002B FORMALDEHYDE 2.0% aq
19. Mx-07 Fragrance stir I 8.0% pet
20. Mx-18 Sesquiterpene lactone stir 0.1% pet
21.

C-007A QUATERNIUM-15 1.0% pet
22. P-022 Propolis 10.0% pet
23. C-009B METHYLISOTHIAZOLINONE+ METHYLCHLOROISOTHIAZOLINONE 0.02% aq
24. B-033B Budesonide 0.01% pet
25. T-031B Tixocortol-21-pivalate 0.1% pet
26. D-049E METHYLDIBROMO GLUTARONITRILE 0.5% pet
27.

Mx-25 Fragrance stir II 14.0% pet
28. L-003 HYDROXYISOHEXYL 3-CYCLOHEXENE CARBOXALDEHYDE 5.0% pet
29. M-035B METHYLISOTHIAZOLINONE 0.2% aq
30. Mx-30 Textile dye stir 6.6% pet

Sulfur dioxide (SO2), sodium bisulfite (NaHSO3), potassium metabisulfite (KHSO3), sodium metabisulfite (Na2S2O5), potassium metabisulfite (K2S2O5), and sodium sulfite (Na2SO3) are allowed as food ingredients in the U.S.

What is a sulphate allergy

These substances are considered as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe).

The U.S. Foodand Drug istration (FDA) requires that the presence of sulfites be declared on food labels when used as an ingredient in the food and also when used as a processing aid or when present in an ingredient used in the food (e.g. dried fruit pieces). Sulfites must be declared in these cases when the concentration in the food is ≥10 ppm entire SO2. [21 CFR 101.100 (a)(4) «For the purposes of paragraph (a)(3) of this section, any sulfiting agent (sulfur dioxide, sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfite, potassium bisulfite, sodium metabisulfite, and potassium metabisulfite) that has been added to any food or to any ingredient in any food and that has no technical effect in that food will be considered to be present in an insignificant quantity only if no detectable quantity of the agent is present in the finished food.

A detectable quantity of sulfiting agent is 10 parts per million or more of the sulfite in the finished food.»] If naturally occurring sulfites also exists in foods, it would contribute to the analytical result. Basically, if the food contains≥ 10 ppm entire SO2, then sulfite must be declared on the label. This will most typically happen when sulfite is deliberately added to the food. The specific name of the additive (e.g. sodium bisulfite) must be declared in the case of use as an intentional ingredient.

Sulfites are also prohibited from certain uses in the U.S.

Sulfites may not be used in products such as meats that serve as a excellent source of vitamin B1 because sulfites can scavenge that vitamin from foods. In 1986, following the identification of numerous cases of sulfite-induced asthma occurring on ingestion of green or fruit salads treated with sulfites, FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables intended to be served raw or presented unused to the public (Fed. Regist. 51:25021-25026, 1986). The only exception is sulfite use on minimally processed potatoes sliced or shredded for frying where sulfite use is still permitted (although FDA has a long-standing, though never finalized, proposal to ban that use also).

Sulfite use as a fungicide during the shipment of unused table grapes is regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, but the concentration of SO2 residues on the table grapes as consumed must be <10 ppm entire SO2.

The labeling of the presence of sulfites on alcoholic beverages is under the jurisdiction of the Taxand Trade Bureau (TTB) of the U.S. Dept. of Treasury. While most ingredients in alcoholic beverages are not declared on the container, the presence of sulfites must be declared. Sulfites are commonly used in wine fermentation to control undesirable growth of acid-producing bacteria while allowing alcohol-producing yeast to proliferate.

Total SO2 levels in foods and beverages should be sure by the optimized Monier-Williams distillation-titration procedure, a method approved by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC).

Alternate methods do exist but FDA and other federal agencies will typically use the AOAC method so any alternative method must provide similar results.

Food products that contain undeclared sulfites at levels above 10 ppm entire SO2 will be subject to potential recall actions. In the U.S., three recall categories are used:

  1. Class II recalls include situations where exposure to the violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is rare.
  2. Class I recalls are the most serious and involve situations where there is a reasonable probability that exposure to the violative product will cause serious adverse health consequences or deaths.

    FDA is aware of deaths occurring among sulfite-sensitive asthmatics.

  3. Class III recalls includes situations where exposure to the violative product is not likely to cause adverse health consequences.

For sulfites, recalls can drop into any of the 3 recall classifications. Using data from controlled oral clinical challenges of sulfite-sensitive asthmatics, the FDA has established dose levels that are associated with Class I, Class II, or Class III recalls. Analysis is done for entire SO2 based upon the AOAC procedure. The analytical result is given in terms of a concentration (ppm).

FDA determines a worst case dose (mg SO2 equivalents) by using the 95th percentile level of consumption of the food in question. Dose estimates are based upon single occasion exposures. The estimated 95th percentile sulfite ingestion dose (in mg) for a single occasion is then obtained by multiplying the sulfite concentration of the food product (in ppm or mg per kg of food) by the 95th percentile level of food consumption (in kg) for the specific food.

Class Est.

95th Percentile Dose

Class I ≥10 mg
Class II 3.7 — 9.9 mg
Class III < 3.7 mg

Timbo B, Koehler KM, Wolyniak C, Klontz KC. 2004. Sulfites — a Foodand Drug istration review of recalls and reported adverse events. J Food Prot 67:1806-1811.


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