What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Your GP might prescribe steroids.

If steroids and other hay fever treatments do not work, your GP may refer you for immunotherapy.

This means you’ll be given little amounts of pollen as an injection or tablet to slowly build up your immunity to pollen.

This helpful of treatment generally starts in the winter about 3 months before the hay fever season begins.


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology.

The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis. It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat.

It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library. As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


How to treat hay fever yourself

There’s currently no cure for hay fever and you cannot prevent it.

But you can do things to ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high.

Do

  1. stay indoors whenever possible
  2. wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  3. vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  4. put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  5. hold windows and doors shut as much as possible
  6. shower and change your clothes after you own been exterior to wash pollen off
  7. purchase a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a special HEPA filter

Don't

  1. do not smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  2. do not spend too much time exterior
  3. do not dry clothes exterior – they can catch pollen
  4. do not cut grass or stroll on grass
  5. do not hold unused flowers in the home
  6. do not let pets into the home if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

Allergy UK has more tips on managing hay fever.


Check if you own hay fever

Symptoms of hay fever include:

  1. pain around your temples and forehead
  2. itchy, red or watery eyes
  3. headache
  4. sneezing and coughing
  5. loss of smell
  6. a runny or blocked nose
  7. earache
  8. itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  9. feeling tired

If you own asthma, you might also:

  1. be short of breath
  2. have a tight feeling in your chest
  3. wheeze and cough

Hay fever will final for weeks or months, unlike a freezing, which generally goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.


What causes hay fever

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen, typically when it comes into contact with your mouth, nose, eyes and throat.

Pollen is a fine powder from plants.

Check the pollen forecast

Media final reviewed: 21 April 2017
Media review due: 21 April 2020

Sheet final reviewed: 21 December 2017
Next review due: 21 December 2020

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone.

Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


A pharmacist can assist with hay fever

Speak to your pharmacist if you own hay fever.

They can give advice and propose the best treatments, love antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to assist with:

  1. itchy and watery eyes and sneezing
  2. a blocked nose

Find a pharmacy

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  1. your symptoms are getting worse
  2. your symptoms do not improve after taking medicines from the pharmacy


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders. Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites.

It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip. As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies.

Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds.

May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds.

May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds.

May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies.

Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control.

When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds.

The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds.

May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies.

Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines.

The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments. Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies.

Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds.

The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies.

Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

Sublingual Immunotherapy

Try to overlook the fact this sounds more love an alien abduction technique than an allergy remedy. “Sublingual immunotherapy also alters the immune system to reduce allergic responses.

Concentrated doses of allergens love grass, pollen, or ragweed (the only ones approved for use in the U.S. correct now for this specific therapy) are placed under the patient’s tongue three times a week for 3 to 5 years. During this time, the body absorbs the allergen, developing a lasting immunity that leaves you with no reaction to the allergen. In fact, a study published in the journal Medicina Universitaria found that, after just 24 weeks of treatment, patients receiving sublingual immunotherapy reported a 94% decrease in drug use for allergy symptom relief.” See?

That wasn’t so bad.

Raw Honey

According to Josh Axe, “the International Archives of Allergy and Immunology published an article in 2011 that tested how pre-seasonal use of birch pollen honey affected people with birch pollen allergies and discovered that patients taking the honey ‘reported a 60% lower entire symptom score, twice as numerous asymptomatic days, and 70% fewer days with severe symptoms, and they used 50% less antihistamines compared to the control group’ that took conventional meds.” He recommends taking one tablespoon per day for allergy relief.

Change Your Diet

This may seem love a gimme, but your allergies can change as we age and during pregnancy.

If you notice unusual reactions after eating, attempt to hold a journal of your meals and remove foods that seem to be causing allergic reactions.

Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control.

When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S.

Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle. There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control.

When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds.

The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies.

Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control. When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds. The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S. Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds.

May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr.

What is a natural remedy for pollen allergies

Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control.

When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense. If you’re experiencing itchy eyes, a runny nose, coughing, sneezing and brain fog, you probably own seasonal allergies. Local pollens are typically sky high in spring; this month, blame pollens from cedar, maple, oak and ash trees, along with pollen from grasses, just hitting its peak, and weeds.

The timing of your symptoms may hold clues to their source, says Candid S.

Virant, M.D., of Northwest Asthma & Allergy Middle. Seattle’s pollen season runs from February to September; those who feel worse in tardy winter and spring are likely more sensitive to tree pollens, while summer sniffles are probably triggered by grasses or weeds. May is often the month when these pollens meet in the middle.

There are a variety of treatments for seasonal allergies, but rather than relying on just one, you might desire to attempt an integrative approach that incorporates both naturopathic and traditional medicines. The signs advertising naturopathic physicians and other alternative medicine specialists that are found in just about every Seattle neighborhood are a excellent indication that Seattleites embrace a variety of options for medical treatments.

Mixing naturopathic and traditional medicines might actually cause harm with some ailments, but that’s not true for seasonal allergies. Dr. Virant and naturopathic doctor Andrew Simon, N.D., who teaches at Bastyr University and has a private practice in Seattle, offer symptom-by-symptom advice for the best fixes for Northwest seasonal allergies.

Whether you select a traditional or an alternative approach to treating your symptoms, don’t wait until you’re miserable to get relief, says Simon, because treating symptoms earlier in the season makes them easier to control.

When it comes to beating pollen, the best defense is a excellent offense.

Beat the Sniffles with Natural Allergy Relief

Looking for a little allergy relief but also hoping to hold things a little more natural during your pregnancy—good news! There are some amazing natural remedies for allergies out there to attempt. Whether the pollen count has got you sniffling or cat dander has left your eyes bloodshot and watery, consider giving some of these natural allergy relief options a attempt. Important pro-tip: consult your doctor before trying any home remedies for allergies—s/he will be best capable to advise what is safest for you and baby.

The Neti Pot

One of the most favorite natural allergy remedies, the Neti Pot flushes out allergens and other irritations by going in one nostril and out the other.

Use a sterile saline solution and flush our your nose twice per day to clear out pollen, mold, dander and other allergy instigators.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar (referred to as ACV enthusiasts), is a favorite natural remedy for a slew of ailments including frequent sneezing, nasal congestion, itchy eyes, and more. Those that swear by ACV emphasize that you should use a certified organic brand and generally recommend taking 1-2 tablespoons per day for optimal health benefits, but nausea-sufferers beware (we’re looking at you First Trimester): it can taste a little bit foul if you drink it straight. We recommend making your daily dose a little tastier with a juice recipe!

Acupuncture

Researchers aren’t 100% certain why acupuncture seems to offer allergy relief for some people, but they suspect that it may somehow assist regulate immune responses.

Prevention.com notes that in a study published in the European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, “patients who underwent a specific type of needling known as athletic acupuncture (meaning the needles were placed in a way that induced a feeling of numbness or tingling) three times a week for four weeks showed a significant reduction in allergy symptoms love nasal congestion and sneezing. People who either had sham acupuncture (improper placement of needles) or no treatment at every got no such relief.” In other words, if you desire to give acupuncture a attempt, make certain you’re going to a reputable practitioner.

Cool Mist Humidifier

You might be tempted to pack away your humidifier as the weather warms up, but in an interview with Women’s Day, Dr.

John Salerno recommended that anyone suffering from seasonal or indoor allergies hold on humidifying . “When it’s still a little cool at night and indoor humidity is low, using a cool-mist humidifier can assist get allergens out of the air,” he explains. “Water droplets bind to the allergens, and they get heavy and drop to the floor so you don’t inhale them.”

Cheers to beating allergies during pregnancy, one natural remedy at a time!

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop.

Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition. More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN). Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states.

Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S. [Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]


RELATED VIDEO: