What is a good cat food for cats with allergies

Further information: Elimination diet

Limited ingredient diets

Main article: Limited ingredient cat diet (LID)

A limited-ingredient diet, also known as limited-antigen food,[8] is an elimination diet that restricts the problematic foods that cause a reaction. Generally these diets focus on removing specific proteins (protein-elimination diets) due to dietary allergies generally being caused by water-soluble glycoproteins,[9][10] but they can also be targeted towards the removal of gluten/wheat, vegetables, or a combination of both.[9] In commercially available versions of these diets, producers generally include one protein and one carbohydrate source, in an effort to minimize reactions to any foods.[9]

Homemade diets

See also: Cat food § Homemade food

Homemade diets are a type of elimination diet, which are made specifically for the cat with allergies, either by the owner or a third-party person love a chef.[11] Studies propose that commercial elimination diets may still react negatively with a cat, even if they are devoid of the target protein/other problematic foods.[11] Numerous pet owners, for this reason, select the homemade option, as it allows them to personally identify the pet’s history, tailor the diet with various ingredients, and consider the process a bonding experience.[9][11] Some drawbacks to a homemade diet are the time needed to store for the ingredients and the potential financial setback.[9]

Also, homemade diets are generally nutritionally deficient.

For example, a study found that 90% of homemade elimination diets are not adequate in terms of nutrition.[9] However, homemade diets are a grand way to determine which ingredient is causing the negative symptoms in the cat.[9]

Hydrolyzed proteins

Main article: Hydrolyzed protein

Hydrolyzed proteins are often used as the primary source of protein in a diet, particularly in elimination diets, since these proteins do not cause allergenic responses.[12] This is because the digestive tract breaks below the protein into individual amino acids that the body is unable to recognize as the offending protein, allowing the protein source to bypass the allergenic immune response associated with IgE.[13] This avoidance of the immune reaction allows the animal to eat a sufficient protein source without the immune system interfering.[13]

Novel proteins

A novel protein is a protein source used in hypoallergenic diets to which the cat has not previously been exposed.[14] Common examples of novel proteins are lamb, rabbit, venison, duck, elk, kangaroo, ostrich, emu, goose and goat.[8] However, there is a chance of cross-reactivity when there is a higher taxonomic relationship between the two species.

For example, cross-reactivity could be caused by other ruminant meats if the cat reacted negatively to beef, or avian meats if the cat reacted negatively to chicken.[8]

Novel proteins can be used in elimination diets as well for long-term management. Numerous commercialized novel protein diets are nutritionally adequate and balanced. They own only one protein source and one carbohydrate source that the cats are unlikely to own ingested before.[15] Owners are more likely to be compliant when feeding a commercial novel protein diet than when feeding a home cooked diet.[8] This is due to the fact that it can be hard to obtain novel proteins for food preparation,[15] and it takes less time to provide a commercial diet than to prepare a home cooked one.[8] In the early ’90s, an experiment was performed showing that novel protein diets had a 70 to 80% success rate.[14] However, commercialized novel protein diets are not always effective, since they are not always tested on animals that own food sensitivities, and the manufacturing process of the diets can cause adverse reactions due to the inclusion of additives which may be allergens to some cats.[14] It is recommended that human-grade meat be used in the diet instead of pet food meats since pet food meats can include preservatives, which can be detrimental to the success of the diet.[15] Also, a study showed that if the processing machinery was not cleaned properly, ground meat that came from one animal could be contaminated with the ground meat from another animal.

This study found that four commercial diets using venison included products that were not on the label. Soy, beef and poultry were found in three of the diets, which are common antigens in cats. However, if the commercial novel protein diet does not cause an adverse reaction in the cat, it can be used endless term.[8]


Allergy identification and treatment

While it is possible to identify what type of symptoms the cat is suffering from, it is best to seek attention from a veterinarian to identify the best treatment possible. In order to identify to which allergens the cat is allergic, veterinarians will commonly use a serum allergy test.

Veterinarians will often recommend over the counter allergy relief products to alleviate mild problems. If the allergy is more severe, allergy immunotherapy may be recommended.[citation needed]


References

  • ^«Feline Atopic Dermatitis — Integumentary System — Merck Veterinary Manual». Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved 2018-01-02.
  • ^«Feline Food Allergies». www.vet.cornell.edu.

    Retrieved 2017-11-29.

  • ^Zoran, Deb (November 2003). «Nutritional management of gastrointestinal disease». Clinical Techniques in Little Animal Practice. 18 (4): 211–217. doi:10.1016/S1096-2867(03)00074-4. PMID 14738201.
  • ^Guaguère, E (1995). «Food intolerance in cats with cutaneous manifestations: a review of 17 cases». European Journal of Companion Animal Practice. 5: 27–35.
  • poultry and/or poultry byproducts
  • ^Leistra, M.; Willemse, T. (December 2002). «Double-blind evaluation of two commercial hypoallergenic diets in cats with adverse food reactions».

    Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. 4 (4): 185–188. doi:10.1053/jfms.2001.0193. ISSN 1098-612X. PMID 12468310.

  • ^ abCarlotti, Didier N.; Remy, Isabelle; Prost, Christine (1990-06-01). «Food Allergy In Dogs And Cats. A Review and Report of 43 Cases». Veterinary Dermatology. 1 (2): 55–62. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3164.1990.tb00080.x. ISSN 1365-3164.
  • fiber sources
  • ^ abcdefGaschen, Frédéric P.; Merchant, Sandra R.

    (March 2011). «Adverse Food Reactions in Dogs and Cats». Veterinary Clinics of North America: Little Animal Practice. 41 (2): 361–379. doi:10.1016/j.cvsm.2011.02.005. PMID 21486641.

  • ^ abcVogelnest, LJ; Cheng, KY (November 2013). «Cutaneous adverse food reactions in cats: retrospective evaluation of 17 cases in a dermatology referral population (2001-2011)». Australian Veterinary Journal. 91 (11): 443–451. doi:10.1111/avj.12112. PMID 24571298.
  • ^Scott, D.

    (2001). «Skin Immune System and Allergic Skin Diseases». Muller & Kirk’s Little Animal Dermatology. pp. 543–666. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7216-7618-0.50012-2. ISBN .

  • ^DACVD, Hilary A. Jackson BVM&S DVD. «Dermatologic manifestations and nutritional management of adverse food reactions». dvm360.com. Retrieved 2017-11-29.
  • grain and/or grain byproducts
  • ^Carlotti, Didier N.

    (2013). «Cutaneous Manifestations of Food Hypersensitivity». Veterinary Allergy. pp. 108–114. doi:10.1002/9781118738818.ch16. ISBN .

  • meat and/or meat byproducts
  • ^ abcVerlinden, A.; Hesta, M.; Millet, S.; Janssens, G. P.J. (18 January 2007). «Food Allergy in Dogs and Cats: A Review». Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. 46 (3): 259–273. doi:10.1080/10408390591001117.

    PMID 16527756.

  • ^ abcCase, Linda (2010). Canine and Feline Nutrition-E-Book. 3251 Riverpool Lane, Maryland Heights, Missouri: Mosby, Inc. p. 399.CS1 maint: location (link)
  • milk products
  • fish meal
  • ^ abCave, Nicholas J. (November 2006). «Hydrolyzed Protein Diets for Dogs and Cats». Veterinary Clinics of North America: Little Animal Practice. 36 (6): 1251–1268. doi:10.1016/j.cvsm.2006.08.008. PMID 17085233.
  • ^ abcdefgCase, Linda (2010).

    Canine and Feline Nutrition-E-Book. 3251 Riverport Lane, Maryland Heights, Missouri: Mosby, Inc. p. 400.CS1 maint: location (link)

  • vitamin and mineral supplements

A cat showing extreme signs of pruritis.

by Shirley-Anne
(B.C., Canada)

My 12 yr ancient male cat was just released from animal hospital after a urinary blockage. He has a severe allergy to chicken (causes skin lesions and diarrhea) and the food they recommended, a Dissolution mix called S/D from Hill’s Prescription Diet, has chicken in it as do most commercial cat foods. Is there any Urinary Tract Dissolution or Preventative formula out there that doesn’t contain chicken?

Thanks!

Hi, Shirley Anne,

Your predicament is not an unusual one. Cats, just love people, can own more than one ailment at a time. I own been treating a cat for several years that has urinary issues, allergies, and now diabetes. The best diet for each of those conditions is diverse.

Recently, he had dental work and was uncomfortable eating afterwards and a decision had to be made as to diet. Eating has to come before any of the other conditions, obviously, so his owners own been offering him anything that he will eat, regardless of his other conditions.

I’m not saying that has to be the case for your kitty, but it could be.

My first thought is to wonder how his allergies were diagnosed. Most often, food allergy in cats is not diagnosed properly.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

The only true way to diagnose food allergy is to eliminate every food except one protein (for example, chicken or beef or fish, etc.) and own the cat eat that and nothing but that for a period of time. Then a diverse protein is tried and then another, until it is truly ascertained what the cat can tolerant and what he can’t.

If your cat had a blood allergy test for food, that is not completely dependable. If he didn’t attempt just the single protein by itself for an extended period of time, but instead had chicken with anything else accompanying it (grains, vegetables, ANYTHING), then you don’t truly know that he is absolutely allergic to chicken.

That is one avenue to pursue if it was not diagnosed correctly. I would highly recommend a consultation with a veterinary dermatologist who specializes in such things.

In addition, my experience and research over the years does not support that S/D is the best diet for cat urinary obstruction. First of every, I assume that a finish urinalysis was performed and that your veterinarian knows the exact type of crystals that were present in your cat’s urine.

If that is not the case, it is essential that it be done.

Unfortunately, there are still «old-fashioned» vets out there that are still assuming every obstructions are from a certain type of crystal that used to be the most common cause of obstructions, when that is no longer the case.

Even if the crystals that were present are indeed triple phosphate (ammonium magnesium phosphate or also called struvite crystals) crystals, the best PRESCRIPTION food for your cat is not S/D, but S/O by Royal Canin. HOWEVER, it is a chicken based diet also. In addition, unless a cat has bladder stones, I do not advocate either of these diets and in fact, discover almost always that surgery is necessary to remove stones.

Instead, most importantly, the bottom line for treatment of and prevention of male cat urinary blockages is not finding a food to change the pH of the urine (which is what C/D or S/O is attempting to do), but to get more water into your cat.

That is accomplished by feeding your cat an exclusively canned food diet.

You can easily discover canned food that does not contain chicken if chicken is indeed the culprit. PLEASE read this web sheet on cat nutrition for urinary obstructions, which is the BEST advice available currently. Your veterinarian may not be familiar with this at every as numerous are not and may argue and ponder this is radical nonsense, but it is not. In fact, the entire website at www.catinfo.org contains the best in advice for cat nutrition of every types: for feline diabetes, obesity in cats, cat urinary issues, etc.

Also, if you do not already own one, purchase a pet water fountain for your cat to drink from.

In addition to the selection of pet fountains found here, they are readily available at your local pet supply stores as well. Cats tend to drink more from water fountains than they do from stagnant water bowls.

Best of luck. I hope I own given you some food for thought (pun intended)! Thanks for writing,

Dr. Neely

Return to Cat Nutrition.

Some of what is taught in veterinary dermatology is handed below from one practitioner to the other without critical appraisal of its scientific worth.

Bad tips and habits are picked up and are never corrected.Royal Canin, founded in 1968, has remained at the cutting edge of veterinary science. They are strongly committed to fueling evidence-based medicine and improving effectiveness in veterinary practice. With the objective of reviewing existing knowledge and dogmas on adverse food reactions in dogs and cats, the available scientific evidence has been reviewed to produce a series of critically appraised topics (CAT), which will hopefully debunk some of the veterinary dermatology misconceptions surrounding food allergies.

The article processing charges for papers in this series were funded by Royal Canin. Royal Canin had no involvement in the production of these papers. Every articles in this series own undergone the journal’s standard peer-review process.

To live a endless, healthy life, your cat needs proper nutrition. Here are some things to
consider when selecting an appropriate diet for your cat.

Necessary Nutrients
Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they rely on nutrients found only in animal products.

Cats evolved as hunters that consume prey that contains high amounts of protein, moderate amounts of fat, and a minimal quantity of carbohydrates, and their diet still requires these general proportions today. Cats also require more than a dozen other nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and amino acids.

Although your cat needs certain amounts of each specific nutrient to be healthy, more is not always better. This is particularly true of vitamins and minerals, so the use of supplements is generally not necessary if you are feeding a balanced and finish diet.

Supplements can be harmful to your cat, and they should never be given without a veterinarian’s approval. Cats should own access to clean, unused water at every times.

Types of  Commercial Cat Food
Commercial cat foods are formulated as dry, semimoist, and canned. These products differ in water content, protein level, caloric density, palatability, and digestibility.

Dry Food
Dry food contains between six and 10 percent water.

Depending on the specific formulation, a mixture of ingredients are combined, extruded, and dried into bite-sized pieces. Ingredients may include:

  1. meat and/or meat byproducts
  2. poultry and/or poultry byproducts
  3. fish meal
  4. grain and/or grain byproducts
  5. milk products
  6. fiber sources
  7. vitamin and mineral supplements

The pieces of dry food are often then coated with flavor enhancers, such as animal fat, to make the food more appetizing.

Dry cat food is relatively inexpensive, and since it does not dry out, it offers owners the convenience of “free choice” feeding. However, dry food may be less palatable to a cat than moist or semi-moist food, and depending on the types and quality of the ingredients, may also be less digestible.

If you do use dry food, it is significant to store unused portions in a cool, dry location, and not to use the food after its expiration date. Owners often purchase large amounts of dry food that can sometimes be stored for months, so checking the expiration date before feeding it to your cat is extremely significant. Storing food for a endless period of time decreases the activity and potency of numerous vitamins and increases the likelihood that fats will become rancid. It’s a excellent thought to store dry cat food in an airtight container to assist prevent nutrient deterioration and maintain flavor.

Semi-Moist Food
Meat and meat byproducts are the primary ingredients of semi-moist food, which contains approximately 35 percent moisture.

Other materials, including soybean meal, cereals, grain byproducts, and preservatives are added to make the final product. The cost of semi-moist food is generally mid-range. Semi-moist foods may be more appealing than dry cat food to some cats and can also be fed free choice. After the package is opened, however, the food can dry out, becoming less palatable and/or becoming rancid.

Canned Food
Canned cat food has a moisture content of at least 75 percent, making it a excellent dietary source of water. It is generally the most expensive type of cat food, but is also highly palatable for most cats.

Numerous diverse varieties are available, which can be helpful if your cat is a finicky eater. Canned food has the longest shelf life when unopened, but any unused portion of opened canned cat food should be refrigerated to maintain quality and prevent spoilage. Gourmet canned cat foods generally feature meats, such as kidney or liver, and whole meat byproducts as primary ingredients. Some brands, however, may be nutritionally incomplete, and it is significant to read the nutrition labels carefully on such specialty cat-food items to ensure that they own a nutritional guarantee.

Choosing A Food
Commercially prepared cat foods own been developed to give your cat the correct balance of nutrients and calories.

Basic minimum nutritional requirements for cats own been established by the Feline Nutrition Expert (FNE) Subcommittee of the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), and manufacturers use these standards in producing cat foods.

Reading the nutrition label on food packaging is the best way to compare cat foods. Pet food manufacturers are required to supply certain nutritional information on the package.

Labeling regulations are established by the AAFCO and the United States Food and Drug istration. Every pet foods that carry an AAFCO-approved nutritional guarantee, often referred to as the“AAFCO statement,” are considered to be nutritionally finish and balanced.

A cat’s nutritional requirements change through diverse stages of life. These stages include kittenhood, adulthood, pregnancy, and lactation. The nutritional claim on the cat food label should state the stage of a cat’s life cycle for which the food is finish and balanced, and that it meets the requirements of the AAFCO. Some cat foods are formulated for every life stages, which can simplify the selection process for owners with multiple cats of diverse ages.

In choosing a cat food, it is also significant to read the ingredients list. As with human foods, the items are listed in order of decreasing proportional weight. Glance for foods in which meat, meat byproducts, or seafood are listed among the first few ingredients, as this indicates the food probably contains enough animal-source ingredients to supply essential amino acids and fatty acids.

Once you own sure that a food is finish and balanced, choosing between the types of food may be a matter of what your cat prefers.

Some cats love canned food, some love dry food, and some love a combination of the two. Select the ones that work best for your cat.

Homemade Diets
Making your own cat food is a hard and time-consuming process, as the recipe may not contain the correct quantities and proportions of nutrients for your cat. It is generally recommended that cat owners purchase nutritionally balanced commercial foods, unless a veterinarian recommends a home-formulated recipe for medical purposes. In that event, your veterinarian will likely recommend a recipe developed by veterinarians certified in animal nutrition.

Treats
While giving your cat an occasional treat is not generally harmful, they are generally not a nutritionally finish and balanced source of nutrition and should only be fed occasionally. A excellent law of thumb is not to let treats exceed 10 to 15 percent of a cat’s daily caloric intake. In addition, some foods should be avoided completely. Although raw meat is an excellent source of numerous nutrients, it is not recommended as a food or a treat for cats, because it is a potential vehicle for toxoplasmosis and other infectious diseases. Some cats that own consumed canned fish products meant for humans own developed potentially serious neurological disorders.

Milk is not generally recommended as a treat for cats, as numerous cats are lactose-intolerant and can develop gastrointestinal problems if fed dairy products.

Other Considerations
Cats can be choosy about where they eat. Hold in mind that heavy-traffic areas, noise, the presence of other animals, dirty food containers, or nearby litter boxes can hinder a cat from eating.

Attempt to be sensitive to your cat’s eating behavior, and make necessary adjustments.

Maintaining a healthy weight is another significant consideration. Cats vary greatly in the quantity of food they need to consume to ensure they don’t become over-or underweight. Obesity is the most common nutrition-related problem in cats, and makes cats susceptible to a number of health problems, including arthritis and diabetes. Enquire your veterinarian to assist you determine the ideal body weight for your cat and follow their suggestions for adjusting your cat’s diet to reach and maintain that weight (Figure 1).

Although numerous cats are content to eat a single food, some cats may develop finicky eating habits and become extremely selective about what foods they’ll accept.

Feeding your cat two or three diverse cat foods provides flavor variety, and may prevent your cat from developing an exclusive preference for a single food. A cat that refuses to eat can develop serious medical problems. This is true for ill cats that lack an appetite, for cats on a diet, and for the finicky cat that refuses to eat. A veterinarian should examine any cat that refuses to eat and is losing weight.

Updated July 2017

A cat showing extreme signs of pruritis.

by Shirley-Anne
(B.C., Canada)

My 12 yr ancient male cat was just released from animal hospital after a urinary blockage. He has a severe allergy to chicken (causes skin lesions and diarrhea) and the food they recommended, a Dissolution mix called S/D from Hill’s Prescription Diet, has chicken in it as do most commercial cat foods.

Is there any Urinary Tract Dissolution or Preventative formula out there that doesn’t contain chicken? Thanks!

Hi, Shirley Anne,

Your predicament is not an unusual one. Cats, just love people, can own more than one ailment at a time. I own been treating a cat for several years that has urinary issues, allergies, and now diabetes. The best diet for each of those conditions is diverse.

Recently, he had dental work and was uncomfortable eating afterwards and a decision had to be made as to diet. Eating has to come before any of the other conditions, obviously, so his owners own been offering him anything that he will eat, regardless of his other conditions.

I’m not saying that has to be the case for your kitty, but it could be.

My first thought is to wonder how his allergies were diagnosed. Most often, food allergy in cats is not diagnosed properly. The only true way to diagnose food allergy is to eliminate every food except one protein (for example, chicken or beef or fish, etc.) and own the cat eat that and nothing but that for a period of time. Then a diverse protein is tried and then another, until it is truly ascertained what the cat can tolerant and what he can’t.

If your cat had a blood allergy test for food, that is not completely dependable. If he didn’t attempt just the single protein by itself for an extended period of time, but instead had chicken with anything else accompanying it (grains, vegetables, ANYTHING), then you don’t truly know that he is absolutely allergic to chicken.

That is one avenue to pursue if it was not diagnosed correctly. I would highly recommend a consultation with a veterinary dermatologist who specializes in such things.

In addition, my experience and research over the years does not support that S/D is the best diet for cat urinary obstruction. First of every, I assume that a finish urinalysis was performed and that your veterinarian knows the exact type of crystals that were present in your cat’s urine.

If that is not the case, it is essential that it be done. Unfortunately, there are still «old-fashioned» vets out there that are still assuming every obstructions are from a certain type of crystal that used to be the most common cause of obstructions, when that is no longer the case.

Even if the crystals that were present are indeed triple phosphate (ammonium magnesium phosphate or also called struvite crystals) crystals, the best PRESCRIPTION food for your cat is not S/D, but S/O by Royal Canin. HOWEVER, it is a chicken based diet also.

In addition, unless a cat has bladder stones, I do not advocate either of these diets and in fact, discover almost always that surgery is necessary to remove stones.

Instead, most importantly, the bottom line for treatment of and prevention of male cat urinary blockages is not finding a food to change the pH of the urine (which is what C/D or S/O is attempting to do), but to get more water into your cat. That is accomplished by feeding your cat an exclusively canned food diet.

You can easily discover canned food that does not contain chicken if chicken is indeed the culprit.

PLEASE read this web sheet on cat nutrition for urinary obstructions, which is the BEST advice available currently. Your veterinarian may not be familiar with this at every as numerous are not and may argue and ponder this is radical nonsense, but it is not. In fact, the entire website at www.catinfo.org contains the best in advice for cat nutrition of every types: for feline diabetes, obesity in cats, cat urinary issues, etc.

Also, if you do not already own one, purchase a pet water fountain for your cat to drink from.

In addition to the selection of pet fountains found here, they are readily available at your local pet supply stores as well.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

Cats tend to drink more from water fountains than they do from stagnant water bowls.

Best of luck. I hope I own given you some food for thought (pun intended)! Thanks for writing,

Dr. Neely

Return to Cat Nutrition.

Some of what is taught in veterinary dermatology is handed below from one practitioner to the other without critical appraisal of its scientific worth.

Bad tips and habits are picked up and are never corrected.Royal Canin, founded in 1968, has remained at the cutting edge of veterinary science.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

They are strongly committed to fueling evidence-based medicine and improving effectiveness in veterinary practice. With the objective of reviewing existing knowledge and dogmas on adverse food reactions in dogs and cats, the available scientific evidence has been reviewed to produce a series of critically appraised topics (CAT), which will hopefully debunk some of the veterinary dermatology misconceptions surrounding food allergies.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

The article processing charges for papers in this series were funded by Royal Canin. Royal Canin had no involvement in the production of these papers. Every articles in this series own undergone the journal’s standard peer-review process.

To live a endless, healthy life, your cat needs proper nutrition. Here are some things to
consider when selecting an appropriate diet for your cat.

Necessary Nutrients
Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they rely on nutrients found only in animal products. Cats evolved as hunters that consume prey that contains high amounts of protein, moderate amounts of fat, and a minimal quantity of carbohydrates, and their diet still requires these general proportions today.

Cats also require more than a dozen other nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and amino acids.

Although your cat needs certain amounts of each specific nutrient to be healthy, more is not always better. This is particularly true of vitamins and minerals, so the use of supplements is generally not necessary if you are feeding a balanced and finish diet. Supplements can be harmful to your cat, and they should never be given without a veterinarian’s approval. Cats should own access to clean, unused water at every times.

Types of  Commercial Cat Food
Commercial cat foods are formulated as dry, semimoist, and canned.

These products differ in water content, protein level, caloric density, palatability, and digestibility.

Dry Food
Dry food contains between six and 10 percent water. Depending on the specific formulation, a mixture of ingredients are combined, extruded, and dried into bite-sized pieces. Ingredients may include:

  1. meat and/or meat byproducts
  2. poultry and/or poultry byproducts
  3. fish meal
  4. grain and/or grain byproducts
  5. milk products
  6. fiber sources
  7. vitamin and mineral supplements

The pieces of dry food are often then coated with flavor enhancers, such as animal fat, to make the food more appetizing.

Dry cat food is relatively inexpensive, and since it does not dry out, it offers owners the convenience of “free choice” feeding. However, dry food may be less palatable to a cat than moist or semi-moist food, and depending on the types and quality of the ingredients, may also be less digestible. If you do use dry food, it is significant to store unused portions in a cool, dry location, and not to use the food after its expiration date. Owners often purchase large amounts of dry food that can sometimes be stored for months, so checking the expiration date before feeding it to your cat is extremely significant.

Storing food for a endless period of time decreases the activity and potency of numerous vitamins and increases the likelihood that fats will become rancid. It’s a excellent thought to store dry cat food in an airtight container to assist prevent nutrient deterioration and maintain flavor.

Semi-Moist Food
Meat and meat byproducts are the primary ingredients of semi-moist food, which contains approximately 35 percent moisture. Other materials, including soybean meal, cereals, grain byproducts, and preservatives are added to make the final product.

The cost of semi-moist food is generally mid-range. Semi-moist foods may be more appealing than dry cat food to some cats and can also be fed free choice. After the package is opened, however, the food can dry out, becoming less palatable and/or becoming rancid.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

Canned Food
Canned cat food has a moisture content of at least 75 percent, making it a excellent dietary source of water. It is generally the most expensive type of cat food, but is also highly palatable for most cats. Numerous diverse varieties are available, which can be helpful if your cat is a finicky eater. Canned food has the longest shelf life when unopened, but any unused portion of opened canned cat food should be refrigerated to maintain quality and prevent spoilage.

Gourmet canned cat foods generally feature meats, such as kidney or liver, and whole meat byproducts as primary ingredients. Some brands, however, may be nutritionally incomplete, and it is significant to read the nutrition labels carefully on such specialty cat-food items to ensure that they own a nutritional guarantee.

Choosing A Food
Commercially prepared cat foods own been developed to give your cat the correct balance of nutrients and calories.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

Basic minimum nutritional requirements for cats own been established by the Feline Nutrition Expert (FNE) Subcommittee of the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), and manufacturers use these standards in producing cat foods.

Reading the nutrition label on food packaging is the best way to compare cat foods. Pet food manufacturers are required to supply certain nutritional information on the package. Labeling regulations are established by the AAFCO and the United States Food and Drug istration.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

Every pet foods that carry an AAFCO-approved nutritional guarantee, often referred to as the“AAFCO statement,” are considered to be nutritionally finish and balanced.

A cat’s nutritional requirements change through diverse stages of life. These stages include kittenhood, adulthood, pregnancy, and lactation. The nutritional claim on the cat food label should state the stage of a cat’s life cycle for which the food is finish and balanced, and that it meets the requirements of the AAFCO.

Some cat foods are formulated for every life stages, which can simplify the selection process for owners with multiple cats of diverse ages.

In choosing a cat food, it is also significant to read the ingredients list. As with human foods, the items are listed in order of decreasing proportional weight. Glance for foods in which meat, meat byproducts, or seafood are listed among the first few ingredients, as this indicates the food probably contains enough animal-source ingredients to supply essential amino acids and fatty acids.

Once you own sure that a food is finish and balanced, choosing between the types of food may be a matter of what your cat prefers. Some cats love canned food, some love dry food, and some love a combination of the two. Select the ones that work best for your cat.

Homemade Diets
Making your own cat food is a hard and time-consuming process, as the recipe may not contain the correct quantities and proportions of nutrients for your cat. It is generally recommended that cat owners purchase nutritionally balanced commercial foods, unless a veterinarian recommends a home-formulated recipe for medical purposes.

What is a excellent cat food for cats with allergies

In that event, your veterinarian will likely recommend a recipe developed by veterinarians certified in animal nutrition.

Treats
While giving your cat an occasional treat is not generally harmful, they are generally not a nutritionally finish and balanced source of nutrition and should only be fed occasionally. A excellent law of thumb is not to let treats exceed 10 to 15 percent of a cat’s daily caloric intake. In addition, some foods should be avoided completely. Although raw meat is an excellent source of numerous nutrients, it is not recommended as a food or a treat for cats, because it is a potential vehicle for toxoplasmosis and other infectious diseases.

Some cats that own consumed canned fish products meant for humans own developed potentially serious neurological disorders. Milk is not generally recommended as a treat for cats, as numerous cats are lactose-intolerant and can develop gastrointestinal problems if fed dairy products.

Other Considerations
Cats can be choosy about where they eat. Hold in mind that heavy-traffic areas, noise, the presence of other animals, dirty food containers, or nearby litter boxes can hinder a cat from eating. Attempt to be sensitive to your cat’s eating behavior, and make necessary adjustments.

Maintaining a healthy weight is another significant consideration.

Cats vary greatly in the quantity of food they need to consume to ensure they don’t become over-or underweight. Obesity is the most common nutrition-related problem in cats, and makes cats susceptible to a number of health problems, including arthritis and diabetes. Enquire your veterinarian to assist you determine the ideal body weight for your cat and follow their suggestions for adjusting your cat’s diet to reach and maintain that weight (Figure 1).

Although numerous cats are content to eat a single food, some cats may develop finicky eating habits and become extremely selective about what foods they’ll accept.

Feeding your cat two or three diverse cat foods provides flavor variety, and may prevent your cat from developing an exclusive preference for a single food. A cat that refuses to eat can develop serious medical problems. This is true for ill cats that lack an appetite, for cats on a diet, and for the finicky cat that refuses to eat. A veterinarian should examine any cat that refuses to eat and is losing weight.

Updated July 2017


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