What is a food allergy doctor called

A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a certain food as harmful and reacts by causing symptoms. This is an allergic reaction. Foods that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

Two Categories of Food Allergies

  • Skin rash, itching, hives
  • Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food. This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody.

    Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.

  • American Board of Allergy and Immunology
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Feeling love something terrible is about to happen
  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.
  • Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  • Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  • American Board of Pediatrics

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  2. Skin rash, itching, hives
  3. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  4. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously.

Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods.

For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods.

Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting.

What is a food allergy doctor called

Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed. In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction.

Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance.

What is a food allergy doctor called

Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus.

The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition.

Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours.

What is a food allergy doctor called

Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height.

What is a food allergy doctor called

Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December 2014.

Board Certifications

  1. American Board of Allergy and Immunology
  2. American Board of Pediatrics

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  2. Skin rash, itching, hives
  3. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  4. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously.

Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis.

The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods. For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods.

For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods. Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue.

Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed.

In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy.

Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat.

The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours.

What is a food allergy doctor called

Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December 2014.

Board Certifications

  1. American Board of Allergy and Immunology
  2. American Board of Pediatrics


Biography

Dr.

Nicole Chadha received her B.A. in psychology from the University of Kansas, then returned to her southern roots in Georgia to pursue her career in medicine. She graduated with her medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, GA. She subsequently completed her pediatric residency at Palmetto Health Richland Children’s Hospital associated with the University of South Carolina and fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Vanderbilt University.
Upon completion of her fellowship, Dr.

Chadha remained on faculty at Vanderbilt as an Assistant Professor within the Division of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine. Dr. Chadha is board certified in Pediatrics and Allergy and Immunology. She is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, and the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology.

Dr. Chadha chose to specialize in Allergy in specific because she enjoys studying the intricacies of the immune system and likes that the specialty allows her to treat both children and adults. The chronic nature of allergic disease affords her the chance to build lasting relationships with her patients.

She finds grand reward in providing care and education that results in an improved quality of life for her patients. Dr. Chadha has numerous interests in a variety of allergic and immunologic conditions, including food allergy, asthma, urticaria, allergic rhinitis, primary immunodeficiency and eosinophilic esophagitis. She has contributed to research on eosinophilic esophagitis in children and has presented her work both locally and nationally.

Dr. Chadha lives in Charlotte with her husband, Ashley, a pediatric pulmonologist, 2 young sons, and 2 dogs. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, reading, cooking, interior design, volunteering and taking part in community events.

Schedule an Appointment

To schedule or update an appointment and general questions, please call…

Or Contact Us

Please note: Due to healthcare privacy laws, we cannot answer any questions pertaining to personal health information by e-mail.

What are the symptoms of food allergy?

Symptoms of food allergy can include hives, vomiting, stomach pain, dizziness, mouth/tongue and throat itching, and can even manifest as difficulty breathing, throat swelling, and in severe cases, coma and death.

Biography

Dr.

Nicole Chadha received her B.A. in psychology from the University of Kansas, then returned to her southern roots in Georgia to pursue her career in medicine. She graduated with her medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, GA. She subsequently completed her pediatric residency at Palmetto Health Richland Children’s Hospital associated with the University of South Carolina and fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Vanderbilt University.
Upon completion of her fellowship, Dr.

Chadha remained on faculty at Vanderbilt as an Assistant Professor within the Division of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine. Dr. Chadha is board certified in Pediatrics and Allergy and Immunology. She is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, and the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology.

Dr. Chadha chose to specialize in Allergy in specific because she enjoys studying the intricacies of the immune system and likes that the specialty allows her to treat both children and adults. The chronic nature of allergic disease affords her the chance to build lasting relationships with her patients.

She finds grand reward in providing care and education that results in an improved quality of life for her patients. Dr. Chadha has numerous interests in a variety of allergic and immunologic conditions, including food allergy, asthma, urticaria, allergic rhinitis, primary immunodeficiency and eosinophilic esophagitis. She has contributed to research on eosinophilic esophagitis in children and has presented her work both locally and nationally.

Dr. Chadha lives in Charlotte with her husband, Ashley, a pediatric pulmonologist, 2 young sons, and 2 dogs.

In her free time, she enjoys traveling, reading, cooking, interior design, volunteering and taking part in community events.

Schedule an Appointment

To schedule or update an appointment and general questions, please call…

Or Contact Us

Please note: Due to healthcare privacy laws, we cannot answer any questions pertaining to personal health information by e-mail.

What is food allergy?

Food allergy, which affects 1-2% of adults and 6-8% of children in the US, is defined as an immediate adverse reaction to components found in food products.

What is a food allergy doctor called

The allergic reaction is caused by pre-formed antibodies to food components which bind to special cells in the bloodstream, releasing chemicals which cause symptoms of an allergic reaction.

How is food allergy diagnosed?

Since reactions can be life-threatening, immediate diagnosis and treatment of food allergy is extremely significant. Allergies to food can be diagnosed at your allergist’s office by skin prick testing. This painless method involves putting a extremely little quantity of each food allergen just under the skin, with results available in 15 minutes.

Sometimes, physicians measure allergy antibodies in the blood to diagnose and follow patients with food allergy. The best test for food allergy, however, is to act out a “food challenge”, where the suspected food is eaten in increasing amounts under shut supervision at an allergist’s office. It is significant to note that allergies change over time, and new allergies can appear at any time regardless of age, so it is best to consult your allergist if you own any new reactions or concerns about food.

What are some common food allergens for children and adults?

The most common allergenic foods for young children are milk, egg, soy, and wheat.

Food allergy in adults is most commonly caused by peanut, tree nut, fish and shellfish. Approximately 80% of young children outgrow allergies to milk and egg; however, only 20% of patients with nut and shellfish allergies lose their allergic reactions over time.

How is food allergy treated?

Currently, treatment for food allergy is strict avoidance of the offending food. This involves reading ingredient labels and being extremely careful when dining exterior of the home. Symptoms of an allergic reaction should be treated with injectable epinephrine, also known as an EpiPen, which should be carried at every times.

In some cases, Benadryl can be used for mild reactions. There is new and exciting research in the field of food allergy which may eventually lead to a cure for both children and adults, however none of these therapies are approved at the present time.

If you suspect that you or your kid may own a food allergy, come and visit your allergist — we can help!

— By Dr. Katharine S. Nelson


Robert S. Call, M.D.

Robert S. Call, M.D.received his allergy training at the University of Virginia and remained on staff as an Instructor in Medicine for 2 years teaching and researching Asthma before moving to Richmond.

Prior to his fellowship in Allergy, he did his Internal Medicine training at Michigan State University, Grand Rapids Campus. He is a Graduate of University of Virginia’s Medical School and School of Arts and Sciences where he received an MD and a BA in Biology.

Currently, Dr. Call practices full time treating adults and children with allergies. His special interests include food allergy and exercise induced asthma. He also owns and is President of Clinical Research Partners(CRP), a clinical trial company.

CRP performs clinical trials in allergy and other internal medicine related areas. In 2005, he was appointed by the Governor of Virginia to the Commonwealth Health Research Board (CHRB) and was the Chair until 2015. CHRB provides funding to universities, hospitals and other facilities throughout the State of Virginia for research projects that benefit the citizens of Virginia. Previously, Dr. Call served as the President of the Allergy and Asthma Society of Virginia, a 2 year post, and as President and Chairman of the Board of the Richmond Academy of Medicine.

Dr. Call’s favorite thing to do exterior of allergy is spending time with his wife, Mary, and his 4 lovely daughters.

AWARDS

Meet Our Staff

For several years running, Dr.

Call has been named a Top Doc by Richmond Magazine.

What is a Food Allergy? There Are Diverse Types of Allergic Reactions to Foods


Education

  1. Residency: University of South Carolina, Palmetto Health Richland Children’s Hospital
  2. Fellowship: Vanderbilt University, Allergy/Immunology
  3. Medical School: Medical College of Georgia
  4. College: University of Kansas, B.A., Psychology


RELATED VIDEO: