What is a dairy allergy

This No Bake S’mores Cheesecake has a graham cracker flavored crust topped with chocolate ganache, wealthy chocolate «cheesecake» made with soaked cashews, and a layer of homemade toasted marshmallow on top! You’d never guess this decadent dessert is gluten-free, dairy-free, and Paleo.

Instructions

  • Chopped the dark chocolate extremely finely. Put in a heatproof bowl; set aside. In a microwavable bowl, heat the coconut milk for 1 minute or until steaming boiling.

    Pour over the chocolate, making certain it’s every covered, and let sit for 2 minutes to let the chocolate melt. Whisk until smooth.

  • Once it’s ready, pile it on top of the cheesecake (you may not use it all) and toast until brown with a kitchen torch. You can spread any additional marshmallow into a little greased pan or ice cube tray to make some additional marshmallows.
  • ⅓cuppure maple syrup
  • Turn the stand mixer on low and stream the boiling syrup over the gelatin. Once every the syrup has been added, slowly turn the speed up to medium-high and beat until the mixture becomes lukewarm and turns white, fluffy, and stretchy.

    Add the vanilla extract while it’s beating. This should take about 10 minutes.

  • 2pitted dates
  • ¼teaspoonkosher salt
  • chocolatedivided (I used 72%)
  • ½cupraw pecans
  • 1/4cupwater
  • In the same food processor or high-powered blender used for the crust (no need to wash between — I used my Vitamix, but most powerful blenders should do the job), combine every of the filling ingredients, including the remaining melted chocolate, and mix for about 2 minutes, or until the mixture is silky smooth and creamy.

    Scrape below the sides as necessary. You may need to add a bit more coconut milk or lemon juice to get it to mix smoothly if your blender isn’t super high-powered.

  • Place in the freezer to set for at least 3 hours or until completely firm before topping with the marshmallow fluff.
  • 2cupsraw cashewssoaked in freezing water for at least four hours or preferably overnight
  • For the marshmallows, stir together the gelatin and 1/4 cup water in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, making certain every the gelatin is moistened.
  • Pour the filling into the prepared pan over the chocolate.

    Smooth out the top and tap the pan hard against the counter a few times to release any air bubbles.

  • 1cup(11 oz.) pure maple syrup
  • Add the pecans, almond flour, pitted dates, coconut oil, cinnamon and salt to a food processor or high-powered blender and pulverize until it comes together into a sort of sticky dough, with little pecan bits remaining. Don’t over process, or it’ll turn into nut butter! Press the pecan date dough evenly along the bottom of the prepared pan.
  • Slice and serve immediately, or store in the refrigerator. I recommend running your knife under boiling water to warm it up before cutting the cheesecake with the still-hot (dried) knife.
  • Grease a 6” springform pan with coconut oil, or line an 6” cake pan with strips of parchment paper for simple removal, and grease well with coconut oil.

    Set aside.

  • Once it’s smooth, taste the mixture and adjust the sweetness/tartness levels, if desired.
  • 1tablespoonvanilla extract or ½ teaspoon vanilla bean powder
  • 2tablespoonscoconut oil or gheeghee gives a nice buttery flavor
  • Measure out 1/3 cup of the melted chocolate and spread it on the crust. Put in the fridge or freezer to harden.
  • 2tablespoonscoconut oilmelted and cooled (use refined coconut oil if you desire no coconut flavor)
  • Serve frozen or let them thaw at room temperature for minutes before serving.

    Store in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

  • In a little saucepan, combine the other 1/4 cup water, maple syrup, and salt. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture reaches soft ball stage on a candy thermometer, about ºF (ºC).
  • pinchsea salt
  • 1/4cupwater
  • 2tablespoonsfresh lemon juice
  • 1teaspooncinnamon
  • 1tablespoongelatinI use Vital Proteins
  • 3/4cupfull-fat canned coconut milk
  • ½cupalmond flour
  • 2teaspoonsvanilla extract

Ingredients

For the cheesecake

  1. 2cupsraw cashewssoaked in freezing water for at least four hours or preferably overnight
  2. 2tablespoonscoconut oilmelted and cooled (use refined coconut oil if you desire no coconut flavor)
  3. ⅓cuppure maple syrup
  4. 3/4cupfull-fat canned coconut milk
  5. 2tablespoonsfresh lemon juice
  6. chocolatedivided (I used 72%)
  7. 1tablespoonvanilla extract or ½ teaspoon vanilla bean powder

For the crust

  1. ½cupraw pecans
  2. 2pitted dates
  3. 2tablespoonscoconut oil or gheeghee gives a nice buttery flavor
  4. ½cupalmond flour
  5. 1teaspooncinnamon
  6. ¼teaspoonkosher salt

For the marshmallow topping

  1. 1/4cupwater
  2. 1/4cupwater
  3. 1cup(11 oz.) pure maple syrup
  4. 1tablespoongelatinI use Vital Proteins
  5. pinchsea salt
  6. 2teaspoonsvanilla extract

Recipe Notes

Prep time does not include chilling of the cheesecake between layers being added.

Because gelatin is used, this recipe is not vegan.

Agar agar may be substituted for the gelatin as a vegan alternative, but I haven’t tried it so I can’t make any guarantees.

7 Comments

What’s really behind ‘gluten sensitivity’?

By Kelly Servick

The patients weren’t crazy—Knut Lundin was certain of that.

What is a dairy allergy

But their ailment was a mystery. They were convinced gluten was making them ill. Yet they didn’t own celiac disease, an autoimmune reaction to that often-villainized tangle of proteins in wheat, barley, and rye. And they tested negative for a wheat allergy. They occupied a medical no man’s land.

About a decade ago, gastroenterologists love Lundin, based at the University of Oslo, came across more and more of those enigmatic cases. «I worked with celiac disease and gluten for so numerous years,» he says, «and then came this wave.» Gluten-free choices began appearing on restaurant menus and creeping onto grocery store shelves.

By , in the United States alone, an estimated 3 million people without celiac disease had sworn off gluten. It was simple to assume that people claiming to be «gluten sensitive» had just been roped into a food fad.

«Generally, the reaction of the gastroenterologist [was] to tell, ‘You don’t own celiac disease or wheat allergy. Goodbye,’» says Armin Alaedini, an immunologist at Columbia University. «A lot of people thought this is perhaps due to some other [food] sensitivity, or it’s in people’s heads.»

But a little community of researchers started searching for a link between wheat components and patients’ symptoms—commonly abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea, and sometimes headaches, fatigue, rashes, and joint pain.

That wheat really can make nonceliac patients ill is now widely accepted. But that’s about as far as the agreement goes.

As data trickle in, entrenched camps own emerged. Some researchers are convinced that numerous patients own an immune reaction to gluten or another substance in wheat—a nebulous illness sometimes called nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS).

Others believe most patients are actually reacting to an excess of poorly absorbed carbohydrates present in wheat and numerous other foods. Those carbohydrates—called FODMAPs, for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols—can cause bloating when they ferment in the gut.

If FODMAPs are the primary culprit, thousands of people may be on gluten-free diets with the support of their doctors and dietitians but without excellent reason.

Those competing theories were on display in a session on wheat sensitivity at a celiac disease symposium held at Columbia in March. In back-to-back talks, Lundin made the case for FODMAPs, and Alaedini for an immune reaction. But in an irony that underscores how muddled the field has become, both researchers started their quests believing something completely different.

Known wheat-related illnesses own clear mechanisms and markers.

People with celiac disease are genetically predisposed to launch a self-destructive immune response when a component of gluten called gliadin penetrates their intestinal lining and sets off inflammatory cells in the tissue under. People with a wheat allergy reply to wheat proteins by churning out a class of antibodies called immunoglobulin E that can set off vomiting, itching, and shortness of breath. The puzzle, for both doctors and researchers, is patients who lack both the telltale antibodies and the visible damage to their intestines but who feel genuine relief when they cut out gluten-containing food.

Some doctors own begun to approve and even recommend a gluten-free diet.

«Ultimately, we’re here not to do science, but to improve quality of life,» says Alessio Fasano, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston who has studied NCGS and written a book on living gluten-free. «If I own to throw bones on the ground and glance at the moon to make somebody better, even if I don’t understand what that means, I’ll do it.»

Like numerous doctors, Lundin believed that (fad dieters and superstitious eaters aside) some patients own a genuine wheat-related ailment. His group helped dispel the notion that NCGS was purely psychosomatic.

They surveyed patients for unusual levels of psychological distress that might express itself as physical symptoms. But the surveys showed no differences between those patients and people with celiac disease, the team reported in As Lundin bluntly puts it: «We know they are not crazy.»

Still, skeptics worried that the field had seized on gluten with shaky evidence that it was the culprit. After every, nobody eats gluten in isolation. «If we did not know about the specific role of gluten in celiac disease, we would never own thought gluten was responsible for [NCGS],» says Stefano Guandalini, a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of Chicago Medical Middle in Illinois.

«Why blame gluten?»

Defenders of NCGS generally acknowledge that other components of wheat might contribute to symptoms. In , a group of proteins in wheat, rye, and barley called amylase trypsin inhibitors emerged as a potential offender, for example, after a team led by biochemist Detlef Schuppan of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany (then at Harvard Medical School in Boston) reported that those proteins can provoke immune cells.

But without biological markers to identify people with NCGS, researchers own relied on self-reported symptoms measured through a «gluten challenge»: Patients rate how they feel before and after cutting out gluten. Then doctors reintroduce gluten or a placebo—ideally disguised in indistinguishable pills or snacks—to see whether the symptoms tick back up.

Alaedini has recently hit on a more objective set of possible biological markers—much to his own surprise.

«I entered this completely as a skeptic,» he says. Over his career, he has gravitated toward studying spectrum disorders, in which diverse symptoms own yet to be united under a clear biological cause—and where public misinformation abounds. His team published a study in , for example, that debunked the favorite suggestion that children with autism had high rates of Lyme disease. «I do studies [where] there is a void,» he says.

In NCGS, Alaedini saw another poorly defined spectrum disorder. He did accept that patients without celiac disease might somehow be sensitive to wheat, on the basis of several trials that measured symptoms after a blinded challenge.

But he was not convinced by previous studies claiming that NCGS patients were more likely than other people to own certain antibodies to gliadin. Numerous of those studies lacked a healthy control group, he says, and relied on commercial antibody kits that gave murky and inconsistent readings.

In , he contacted researchers at the University of Bologna in Italy to obtain blood samples from 80 patients their team had identified as gluten sensitive on the basis of a gluten challenge. He wanted to test the samples for signs of a unique immune response—a set of signaling molecules diverse from those in the blood of healthy volunteers and celiac patients.

He wasn’t optimistic. «I thought if we were going to see something, love with a lot of spectrum conditions that I own looked at, we would see little differences.»

The results shocked him. Compared with both healthy people and those with celiac, these patients had significantly higher levels of a certain class of antibodies against gluten that propose a short-lived, systemic immune response. That didn’t mean gluten itself was causing disease, but the finding hinted that the barrier of those patients’ intestines might be faulty, allowing partially digested gluten to get out of the gut and interact with immune cells in the blood.

Other elements—such as immune response–provoking bacteria—also might be escaping. Certain enough, the team found elevated levels of two proteins that indicate an inflammatory response to bacteria. And when 20 of the same patients spent 6 months on a gluten-free diet, their blood levels of those markers declined.

For Alaedini, the beginnings of a mechanism emerged: Some still-unidentified wheat component prompts the intestinal lining to become more permeable. (An imbalance in gut microbes might be a predisposing factor.) Components of bacteria then seem to sneak past immune cells in the underlying intestinal tissue and make their way to the bloodstream and liver, prompting inflammation.

«This is a genuine condition, and there can be objective, biological markers for it,» Alaedini says.

«That study changed a lot of minds, including my own.»

The study also impressed Guandalini, a longtime skeptic about the role of gluten.

What is a dairy allergy

It «opens the way to finally reach an identifiable marker for this condition,» he says.

But others see the immune-response explanation as a red herring. To them, the primary villain is FODMAPs. The term, coined by gastroenterologist Peter Gibson at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, and his team, encompasses a smorgasbord of common foods. Onions and garlic; legumes; milk and yogurt; and fruits including apples, cherries, and mangoes are every high in FODMAPs.

So is wheat: Carbs in wheat called fructans can account for as much as half of a person’s FODMAP intake, dietitians in Gibson’s group own estimated. The team found that those compounds ferment in the gut to cause symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, such as abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.

Gibson has endless been skeptical of studies implicating gluten in such symptoms, arguing that those findings are hopelessly clouded by the nocebo effect, in which the mere expectation of swallowing the dreaded ingredient worsens symptoms.

What is a dairy allergy

His team found that most patients couldn’t reliably distinguish pure gluten from a placebo in a blinded test. He believes that numerous people feel better after eliminating wheat not because they own calmed some intricate immune reaction, but because they’ve reduced their intake of FODMAPs.

Lundin, who was firmly in the immune-reaction camp, didn’t believe that FODMAPs could explain away every his patients. «I wanted to show that Peter was wrong,» he says. During a 2-week sabbatical in the Monash lab, he found some quinoa-based snack bars designed to disguise the taste and texture of ingredients.

«I said, ‘We’re going to take those muesli bars and we’re going to do the perfect study.’»

His team recruited 59 people on self-instituted gluten-free diets and randomized them to get one of three indistinguishable snack bars, containing isolated gluten, isolated FODMAP (fructan), or neither. After eating one type of bar daily for a week, they reported any symptoms. Then they waited for symptoms to resolve and started on a diverse bar until they had tested every three.

Before analyzing patient responses, Lundin was confident that gluten would cause the worst symptoms.

But when the study’s blind was lifted, only the FODMAP symptoms even cleared the bar for statistical significance. Twenty-four of the 59 patients had their highest symptom scores after a week of the fructan-laced bars.

What is a dairy allergy

Twenty-two responded most to the placebo, and just 13 to gluten, Lundin and his collaborators—who included Gibson—reported final November in the journal Gastroenterology. Lundin now believes FODMAPs explain the symptoms in most wheat-avoiding patients. «My main reason for doing that study was to discover out a excellent method of finding gluten-sensitive individuals,» he says. «And there were none. And that was fairly amazing.»

At the Columbia meeting, Alaedini and Lundin went head to head in consecutive talks titled «It’s the Wheat» and «It’s FODMAPS.» Each has a list of criticisms of the other’s study.

Alaedini contends that by recruiting broadly from the gluten-free population, instead of finding patients who reacted to wheat in a challenge, Lundin likely failed to include people with a true wheat sensitivity. Extremely few of Lundin’s subjects reported symptoms exterior the intestines, such as rash or fatigue, that might point to a widespread immune condition, Alaedini says.

What is a dairy allergy

And he notes that the increase in patients’ symptoms in response to the FODMAP snacks was just barely statistically significant.

Lundin, meanwhile, points out that the patients in Alaedini’s study didn’t go through a blinded challenge to check whether the immune markers he identified really spiked in response to wheat or gluten. The markers may not be specific to people with a wheat sensitivity, Lundin says.

Despite the adversarial titles of their talks, the two researchers discover a lot of common ground.

Alaedini agrees that FODMAPs explain some of the wheat-avoidance phenomenon. And Lundin acknowledges that some little population may really own an immune reaction to gluten or another component of wheat, though he sees no excellent way to discover them.

After the meeting, Elena Verdù, a gastroenterologist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, puzzled over the polarization of the field. «I don’t understand why there is this need to be so dogmatic about ‘it is this, it is not that,’» she says.

She worries that the scientific confusion breeds skepticism toward people who avoid gluten for medical reasons.

When she dines with celiac patients, she says, waiters sometimes meet requests for gluten-free food with smirks and questions. Meanwhile, the conflicting messages may send nonceliac patients below a food-avoidance rabbit hole. «Patients are withdrawing gluten first, then lactose, and then FODMAPs—and then they are on a really, really poor diet,» she says.

But Verdù believes careful research will ultimately break through the superstitions. She is president of the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease, which this year awarded its first grant to study nonceliac wheat sensitivity.

She’s hopeful that the search for biomarkers love those Alaedini has proposed will show that inside the monolith of gluten avoidance lurk multiple, nuanced conditions. «It will be difficult,» she says, «but we are getting closer.»

doi/

Ingredients

For the cheesecake

  1. 2cupsraw cashewssoaked in freezing water for at least four hours or preferably overnight
  2. 2tablespoonscoconut oilmelted and cooled (use refined coconut oil if you desire no coconut flavor)
  3. ⅓cuppure maple syrup
  4. 3/4cupfull-fat canned coconut milk
  5. 2tablespoonsfresh lemon juice
  6. chocolatedivided (I used 72%)
  7. 1tablespoonvanilla extract or ½ teaspoon vanilla bean powder

For the crust

  1. ½cupraw pecans
  2. 2pitted dates
  3. 2tablespoonscoconut oil or gheeghee gives a nice buttery flavor
  4. ½cupalmond flour
  5. 1teaspooncinnamon
  6. ¼teaspoonkosher salt

For the marshmallow topping

  1. 1/4cupwater
  2. 1/4cupwater
  3. 1cup(11 oz.) pure maple syrup
  4. 1tablespoongelatinI use Vital Proteins
  5. pinchsea salt
  6. 2teaspoonsvanilla extract

Recipe Notes

Prep time does not include chilling of the cheesecake between layers being added.

Because gelatin is used, this recipe is not vegan.

Agar agar may be substituted for the gelatin as a vegan alternative, but I haven’t tried it so I can’t make any guarantees.

7 Comments

What’s really behind ‘gluten sensitivity’?

By Kelly Servick

The patients weren’t crazy—Knut Lundin was certain of that. But their ailment was a mystery. They were convinced gluten was making them ill. Yet they didn’t own celiac disease, an autoimmune reaction to that often-villainized tangle of proteins in wheat, barley, and rye. And they tested negative for a wheat allergy. They occupied a medical no man’s land.

About a decade ago, gastroenterologists love Lundin, based at the University of Oslo, came across more and more of those enigmatic cases.

«I worked with celiac disease and gluten for so numerous years,» he says, «and then came this wave.» Gluten-free choices began appearing on restaurant menus and creeping onto grocery store shelves. By , in the United States alone, an estimated 3 million people without celiac disease had sworn off gluten. It was simple to assume that people claiming to be «gluten sensitive» had just been roped into a food fad.

«Generally, the reaction of the gastroenterologist [was] to tell, ‘You don’t own celiac disease or wheat allergy. Goodbye,’» says Armin Alaedini, an immunologist at Columbia University. «A lot of people thought this is perhaps due to some other [food] sensitivity, or it’s in people’s heads.»

But a little community of researchers started searching for a link between wheat components and patients’ symptoms—commonly abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea, and sometimes headaches, fatigue, rashes, and joint pain.

That wheat really can make nonceliac patients ill is now widely accepted. But that’s about as far as the agreement goes.

As data trickle in, entrenched camps own emerged. Some researchers are convinced that numerous patients own an immune reaction to gluten or another substance in wheat—a nebulous illness sometimes called nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS).

Others believe most patients are actually reacting to an excess of poorly absorbed carbohydrates present in wheat and numerous other foods. Those carbohydrates—called FODMAPs, for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols—can cause bloating when they ferment in the gut.

If FODMAPs are the primary culprit, thousands of people may be on gluten-free diets with the support of their doctors and dietitians but without excellent reason.

Those competing theories were on display in a session on wheat sensitivity at a celiac disease symposium held at Columbia in March. In back-to-back talks, Lundin made the case for FODMAPs, and Alaedini for an immune reaction. But in an irony that underscores how muddled the field has become, both researchers started their quests believing something completely different.

Known wheat-related illnesses own clear mechanisms and markers. People with celiac disease are genetically predisposed to launch a self-destructive immune response when a component of gluten called gliadin penetrates their intestinal lining and sets off inflammatory cells in the tissue under.

People with a wheat allergy reply to wheat proteins by churning out a class of antibodies called immunoglobulin E that can set off vomiting, itching, and shortness of breath. The puzzle, for both doctors and researchers, is patients who lack both the telltale antibodies and the visible damage to their intestines but who feel genuine relief when they cut out gluten-containing food.

Some doctors own begun to approve and even recommend a gluten-free diet. «Ultimately, we’re here not to do science, but to improve quality of life,» says Alessio Fasano, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston who has studied NCGS and written a book on living gluten-free.

What is a dairy allergy

«If I own to throw bones on the ground and glance at the moon to make somebody better, even if I don’t understand what that means, I’ll do it.»

Like numerous doctors, Lundin believed that (fad dieters and superstitious eaters aside) some patients own a genuine wheat-related ailment. His group helped dispel the notion that NCGS was purely psychosomatic. They surveyed patients for unusual levels of psychological distress that might express itself as physical symptoms. But the surveys showed no differences between those patients and people with celiac disease, the team reported in As Lundin bluntly puts it: «We know they are not crazy.»

Still, skeptics worried that the field had seized on gluten with shaky evidence that it was the culprit.

After every, nobody eats gluten in isolation. «If we did not know about the specific role of gluten in celiac disease, we would never own thought gluten was responsible for [NCGS],» says Stefano Guandalini, a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of Chicago Medical Middle in Illinois. «Why blame gluten?»

Defenders of NCGS generally acknowledge that other components of wheat might contribute to symptoms. In , a group of proteins in wheat, rye, and barley called amylase trypsin inhibitors emerged as a potential offender, for example, after a team led by biochemist Detlef Schuppan of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany (then at Harvard Medical School in Boston) reported that those proteins can provoke immune cells.

But without biological markers to identify people with NCGS, researchers own relied on self-reported symptoms measured through a «gluten challenge»: Patients rate how they feel before and after cutting out gluten.

Then doctors reintroduce gluten or a placebo—ideally disguised in indistinguishable pills or snacks—to see whether the symptoms tick back up.

Alaedini has recently hit on a more objective set of possible biological markers—much to his own surprise. «I entered this completely as a skeptic,» he says. Over his career, he has gravitated toward studying spectrum disorders, in which diverse symptoms own yet to be united under a clear biological cause—and where public misinformation abounds.

His team published a study in , for example, that debunked the favorite suggestion that children with autism had high rates of Lyme disease. «I do studies [where] there is a void,» he says.

In NCGS, Alaedini saw another poorly defined spectrum disorder. He did accept that patients without celiac disease might somehow be sensitive to wheat, on the basis of several trials that measured symptoms after a blinded challenge. But he was not convinced by previous studies claiming that NCGS patients were more likely than other people to own certain antibodies to gliadin.

Numerous of those studies lacked a healthy control group, he says, and relied on commercial antibody kits that gave murky and inconsistent readings.

In , he contacted researchers at the University of Bologna in Italy to obtain blood samples from 80 patients their team had identified as gluten sensitive on the basis of a gluten challenge. He wanted to test the samples for signs of a unique immune response—a set of signaling molecules diverse from those in the blood of healthy volunteers and celiac patients. He wasn’t optimistic. «I thought if we were going to see something, love with a lot of spectrum conditions that I own looked at, we would see little differences.»

The results shocked him.

Compared with both healthy people and those with celiac, these patients had significantly higher levels of a certain class of antibodies against gluten that propose a short-lived, systemic immune response. That didn’t mean gluten itself was causing disease, but the finding hinted that the barrier of those patients’ intestines might be faulty, allowing partially digested gluten to get out of the gut and interact with immune cells in the blood.

Other elements—such as immune response–provoking bacteria—also might be escaping. Certain enough, the team found elevated levels of two proteins that indicate an inflammatory response to bacteria. And when 20 of the same patients spent 6 months on a gluten-free diet, their blood levels of those markers declined.

For Alaedini, the beginnings of a mechanism emerged: Some still-unidentified wheat component prompts the intestinal lining to become more permeable. (An imbalance in gut microbes might be a predisposing factor.) Components of bacteria then seem to sneak past immune cells in the underlying intestinal tissue and make their way to the bloodstream and liver, prompting inflammation.

«This is a genuine condition, and there can be objective, biological markers for it,» Alaedini says.

«That study changed a lot of minds, including my own.»

The study also impressed Guandalini, a longtime skeptic about the role of gluten. It «opens the way to finally reach an identifiable marker for this condition,» he says.

But others see the immune-response explanation as a red herring. To them, the primary villain is FODMAPs. The term, coined by gastroenterologist Peter Gibson at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, and his team, encompasses a smorgasbord of common foods.

Onions and garlic; legumes; milk and yogurt; and fruits including apples, cherries, and mangoes are every high in FODMAPs. So is wheat: Carbs in wheat called fructans can account for as much as half of a person’s FODMAP intake, dietitians in Gibson’s group own estimated. The team found that those compounds ferment in the gut to cause symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, such as abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.

Gibson has endless been skeptical of studies implicating gluten in such symptoms, arguing that those findings are hopelessly clouded by the nocebo effect, in which the mere expectation of swallowing the dreaded ingredient worsens symptoms.

What is a dairy allergy

His team found that most patients couldn’t reliably distinguish pure gluten from a placebo in a blinded test. He believes that numerous people feel better after eliminating wheat not because they own calmed some intricate immune reaction, but because they’ve reduced their intake of FODMAPs.

Lundin, who was firmly in the immune-reaction camp, didn’t believe that FODMAPs could explain away every his patients. «I wanted to show that Peter was wrong,» he says. During a 2-week sabbatical in the Monash lab, he found some quinoa-based snack bars designed to disguise the taste and texture of ingredients.

«I said, ‘We’re going to take those muesli bars and we’re going to do the perfect study.’»

His team recruited 59 people on self-instituted gluten-free diets and randomized them to get one of three indistinguishable snack bars, containing isolated gluten, isolated FODMAP (fructan), or neither. After eating one type of bar daily for a week, they reported any symptoms. Then they waited for symptoms to resolve and started on a diverse bar until they had tested every three.

Before analyzing patient responses, Lundin was confident that gluten would cause the worst symptoms.

But when the study’s blind was lifted, only the FODMAP symptoms even cleared the bar for statistical significance. Twenty-four of the 59 patients had their highest symptom scores after a week of the fructan-laced bars. Twenty-two responded most to the placebo, and just 13 to gluten, Lundin and his collaborators—who included Gibson—reported final November in the journal Gastroenterology. Lundin now believes FODMAPs explain the symptoms in most wheat-avoiding patients.

«My main reason for doing that study was to discover out a excellent method of finding gluten-sensitive individuals,» he says. «And there were none. And that was fairly amazing.»

At the Columbia meeting, Alaedini and Lundin went head to head in consecutive talks titled «It’s the Wheat» and «It’s FODMAPS.» Each has a list of criticisms of the other’s study. Alaedini contends that by recruiting broadly from the gluten-free population, instead of finding patients who reacted to wheat in a challenge, Lundin likely failed to include people with a true wheat sensitivity.

Extremely few of Lundin’s subjects reported symptoms exterior the intestines, such as rash or fatigue, that might point to a widespread immune condition, Alaedini says. And he notes that the increase in patients’ symptoms in response to the FODMAP snacks was just barely statistically significant.

Lundin, meanwhile, points out that the patients in Alaedini’s study didn’t go through a blinded challenge to check whether the immune markers he identified really spiked in response to wheat or gluten. The markers may not be specific to people with a wheat sensitivity, Lundin says.

Despite the adversarial titles of their talks, the two researchers discover a lot of common ground.

Alaedini agrees that FODMAPs explain some of the wheat-avoidance phenomenon. And Lundin acknowledges that some little population may really own an immune reaction to gluten or another component of wheat, though he sees no excellent way to discover them.

After the meeting, Elena Verdù, a gastroenterologist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, puzzled over the polarization of the field. «I don’t understand why there is this need to be so dogmatic about ‘it is this, it is not that,’» she says.

She worries that the scientific confusion breeds skepticism toward people who avoid gluten for medical reasons.

When she dines with celiac patients, she says, waiters sometimes meet requests for gluten-free food with smirks and questions. Meanwhile, the conflicting messages may send nonceliac patients below a food-avoidance rabbit hole. «Patients are withdrawing gluten first, then lactose, and then FODMAPs—and then they are on a really, really poor diet,» she says.

But Verdù believes careful research will ultimately break through the superstitions. She is president of the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease, which this year awarded its first grant to study nonceliac wheat sensitivity. She’s hopeful that the search for biomarkers love those Alaedini has proposed will show that inside the monolith of gluten avoidance lurk multiple, nuanced conditions.

«It will be difficult,» she says, «but we are getting closer.»

doi/


This Smores Ice Cream is

  1. Satisfying
  2. Vegan
  3. A healthier frozen treat
  4. Dairy free
  5. Transfer banana ice cream to a loaf pan or freezer-safe dish.
  6. Mix in chocolate chunks, marshmallows, and crushed graham crackers.
  7. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Put sliced bananas on baking sheet and freeze for about 2 hours.

  8. When bananas are frozen, add milk (or water), frozen banana slices, cocoa powder, and salt to a high-powered blender or food processor. Process until smooth. You may need to hesitate to scrape below the sides of the blender to make certain bananas are fully blended and smooth.

  9. Cover ice cream and freeze for at least hours, depending on your desired consistency.
  10. Delicious
  11. Naturally sweet
  12. Made with just 6 ingredients
  13. Serve in a cone (trust me!).

Print

Dairy Free S’mores Ice Cream

Get your s’mores repair without the campfire with this Dairy Free S’mores Ice Cream, full of chocolate chunks, chewy marshmallows, and graham cracker pieces, over a base of chocolate banana ice cream.

Dairy Free, Nut Free, Gluten Free option, Vegan option, Soy Free, Egg Free

Instructions

  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Put sliced bananas on baking sheet and freeze for about 2 hours.

  • Transfer banana ice cream to a loaf pan or freezer-safe dish.
  • Mix in chocolate chunks, marshmallows, and crushed graham crackers.
  • When bananas are frozen, add milk (or water), frozen banana slices, cocoa powder, and salt to a high-powered blender or food processor.

    Process until smooth. You may need to hesitate to scrape below the sides of the blender to make certain bananas are fully blended and smooth.

  • Cover ice cream and freeze for at least hours, depending on your desired consistency.
  • Serve in a cone (trust me!).

Dont Forget to PIN this sweet treat to save the recipe for later

I cant wait to see you attempt it! Tag me in your ice cream pics on Instagram!
XO

This No Bake Smores Cheesecake has a graham cracker flavored crust topped with chocolate ganache, wealthy chocolate cheesecake made with soaked cashews, and a layer of homemade toasted marshmallow on top!

Youd never guess this decadent dessert is gluten-free, dairy-free, and Paleo.

This was one of those recipes I was a little nervous to make, not because I didnt ponder it would taste yummy, but because I was certain that it would never turn out looking the way I was envisioning in my head.

I imagined a dark, deeply chocolatey cheesecake layer, on top of a layer of chocolate ganache and a graham cracker flavored crust, with a pile of toasted marshmallow fluff on top. Each step of the way, I was doubting myself that it would turn out.

And then, as each step was completed, looking just the way I wanted, I breathed out a little sigh of relief.

As I made the marshmallow, the final step and the one I was most worried about, I kept doubting myself. Did I add enough gelatin? Will it set up, or am I going to take off the sides of the springform pan and own the whole thing spill below the sides and drop apart?

As I wiggled off the pan and saw smooth sides and a perfect marshmallow layer, I realized I was worrying for no reason. Ive been trying to argue against my worries lately, because generally, my worries never come to be.

Instead of focusing on negative what-ifs, Im trying to transition my thinking into channeling positive results.

Ive realized that generally, when Im worrying, instead of mitigating the possibility, Im stoking its fire, and giving it the energy it needs to come to be. By ignoring possible negative outcomes, Im capable to give credence to the positive outcomes that Im after.

Now, thankfully, every my worries didnt come to be in this Smores Cheesecake. Instead, it turned out spectacularly, encompassing every the glorious flavors of smores I was after.

This Smores Cheesecake is not your typical cheesecake; instead, its completely gluten-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free, and Paleo-friendly.

It starts with a crust that, although completely graham cracker free, gives the flavor profile were after. Its barely sweetened with dates, and loaded with cinnamon for that graham cracker flavor.

A layer of chocolate ganache is spread on top of the crust. The filling is cashew-based and turns out incredibly creamy after a endless mix in a high-powered blender or food processor. Its lightly sweetened with maple syrup and loaded up with melted dark chocolate, which gives that wealthy, deep chocolate flavor.

And finally, that glorious marshmallow topping! This is the most hard part of the process, for certain, but its still relatively simple to do you just need to be paying attention to the temperature and make certain everything is well-greased so you dont own a sticky mess!

The marshmallows are made with Vital Proteins gelatin, which is my favorite because its grass-fed and amaaazing for your joints, skin, hair, nails, and gut health.

Once youve got your marshmallow piled on top of the chocolate cheesecake, let it set, remove the ring of the springform pan, and toast the top with a kitchen torch to get it nice and toasty. Because it cant really be smores without a toasted marshmallow!

Once its ready, slice it up and serve!

I bet no one would EVER guess this guy is Paleo, especially with that thick layer of fluffy marshmallow. Its smores heaven Im telling you. Hope youll give it a try! Enjoy :)

Want more cashew cheesecake goodness?! Check out these faves >

Remember to #bakerita if you attempt the recipe!

This post is sponsored by Vital Proteins. Thanks for supporting the brands that support Bakerita!

Dont Forget to PIN this sweet treat to save the recipe for later

I cant wait to see you attempt it!

Tag me in your ice cream pics on Instagram!
XO

This No Bake Smores Cheesecake has a graham cracker flavored crust topped with chocolate ganache, wealthy chocolate cheesecake made with soaked cashews, and a layer of homemade toasted marshmallow on top! Youd never guess this decadent dessert is gluten-free, dairy-free, and Paleo.

This was one of those recipes I was a little nervous to make, not because I didnt ponder it would taste yummy, but because I was certain that it would never turn out looking the way I was envisioning in my head.

I imagined a dark, deeply chocolatey cheesecake layer, on top of a layer of chocolate ganache and a graham cracker flavored crust, with a pile of toasted marshmallow fluff on top.

Each step of the way, I was doubting myself that it would turn out.

And then, as each step was completed, looking just the way I wanted, I breathed out a little sigh of relief. As I made the marshmallow, the final step and the one I was most worried about, I kept doubting myself. Did I add enough gelatin? Will it set up, or am I going to take off the sides of the springform pan and own the whole thing spill below the sides and drop apart?

As I wiggled off the pan and saw smooth sides and a perfect marshmallow layer, I realized I was worrying for no reason. Ive been trying to argue against my worries lately, because generally, my worries never come to be.

Instead of focusing on negative what-ifs, Im trying to transition my thinking into channeling positive results.

Ive realized that generally, when Im worrying, instead of mitigating the possibility, Im stoking its fire, and giving it the energy it needs to come to be. By ignoring possible negative outcomes, Im capable to give credence to the positive outcomes that Im after.

Now, thankfully, every my worries didnt come to be in this Smores Cheesecake.

Instead, it turned out spectacularly, encompassing every the glorious flavors of smores I was after.

This Smores Cheesecake is not your typical cheesecake; instead, its completely gluten-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free, and Paleo-friendly. It starts with a crust that, although completely graham cracker free, gives the flavor profile were after. Its barely sweetened with dates, and loaded with cinnamon for that graham cracker flavor.

A layer of chocolate ganache is spread on top of the crust.

The filling is cashew-based and turns out incredibly creamy after a endless mix in a high-powered blender or food processor. Its lightly sweetened with maple syrup and loaded up with melted dark chocolate, which gives that wealthy, deep chocolate flavor.

And finally, that glorious marshmallow topping! This is the most hard part of the process, for certain, but its still relatively simple to do you just need to be paying attention to the temperature and make certain everything is well-greased so you dont own a sticky mess!

The marshmallows are made with Vital Proteins gelatin, which is my favorite because its grass-fed and amaaazing for your joints, skin, hair, nails, and gut health.

Once youve got your marshmallow piled on top of the chocolate cheesecake, let it set, remove the ring of the springform pan, and toast the top with a kitchen torch to get it nice and toasty. Because it cant really be smores without a toasted marshmallow!

Once its ready, slice it up and serve! I bet no one would EVER guess this guy is Paleo, especially with that thick layer of fluffy marshmallow.

Its smores heaven Im telling you. Hope youll give it a try! Enjoy :)

Want more cashew cheesecake goodness?! Check out these faves >

Remember to #bakerita if you attempt the recipe!

This post is sponsored by Vital Proteins. Thanks for supporting the brands that support Bakerita!


Non-Dairy Ice Cream Alternatives

For those of us that don’t always tolerate dairy so well, there are now luckily tons of options out there. My personal favorite is banana “ice cream.”

It’s creamy, naturally sweet, so simple to make, food allergy friendly, and just every around DELICIOUS!

What is a dairy allergy

Plus, if you can get some additional vitamins and minerals in there by using fruit, why not?!

(Hint: theres NO NEED to fear bananas!)

If you haven’t tried banana ice cream (or “nice cream” as some love to call it), whatchu waiting for?

My classic go-to combination for banana ice cream is my salted double chocolate version. Even though I’ve never been a chocolate ice cream kinda gal, this always hits the spot when a chocolate craving comes on.

And if I’m really treating myself, I’ll add rainbow sprinkles on top!

But since I’m always thinking of new flavors to attempt (like my Cherry Chocolate Ice Cream I shared final summer), I was ready to shove the limits and make something Additional GOOD.

You’ve gotta attempt my newest banana ice cream flavor…

I used a similar base as my double chocolate banana ice cream, dotted it with mini marshmallows, graham cracker pieces, and chocolate chunks.

OH EM GEE GOOD!

Sometimes you just dont need the toppings on top of your ice cream, but rather mixed in.

Heres how to make it

The base of this nice cream starts with bananas.

Bananas own a natural creaminess when frozen and blended that lends an ice cream-like texture. Plus, bananas are full of potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B6, magnesium, and some fiber. Youre not going to discover every that in your typical ice cream!

To make your blender ice cream simple to mix, I propose freezing SLICED bananas instead of whole bananas. This way, its MUCH easier to mix with less liquid so you get more naners, less water or milk mixed in. This also amps up the creaminess and limits the icy factor.

Another pro tip when making banana ice cream always put some liquid in the blender FIRST. Then add the fruit, cocoa powder, and salt before blending.

Believe me, it just makes it easier!

Lets talk about sweet treats for a little

Im a large believer that we should own our cake (or ice cream!) and feel grand too. Theres NO NEED to abstain from your favorite foods ice cream, included!

When we restrict favorite foods, we desire them more. Remember this restrict/binge cycle? Its basic human nature we desire what we cant have.

Thats why I Desire you to indulge your sweet tooth.

HOWEVER, if you own a sweet tooth (like yours truly), it may be beneficial to lighten up your favorites so you can still FEEL GOOD.

As much as I would love to eat a huge Oreo ice cream cone everyday with boiling fudge or even marshmallow fluff, I would feel love absolute CRAP after, and likely the next day too.

Dairy doesnt consent with my stomach and Id likely get a sugar overload headache. Then the next day Id probably feel sluggish and blah from eating a enjoyment food that doesnt assist me feel so good.

Of course, theres a time and a put for these indulgent enjoyment foods that may not always assist us feel excellent. BUT, if you love to regularly indulge your sweet tooth (like moi), having a lighter option can be really helpful.


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From Sunset & Strawberry to Dandelion Hazelnut Cookies and Cream, we can’t believe it’s not dairy — and you won’t either

Words by MARIE Glance and KAREN PALMER

Leave it to Los Angeles to own more vegan ice cream than you can shake a sugar cone at — but given how excellent vegan ice cream has become, who needs the dairy? Local scoop shops are going every in on bases love coconut cream and cashew milk to create wealthy, craveable flavors that taste just as creamy and yummy as the traditional summertime treat.

Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite spots for non-dairy frozen treats.

COOLHAUS

Culver City-based Coolhaus recently debuted dairy-free premium pints and ice cream sandwiches made with pea protein and organic cocoa butter and whole grain rice.

THE SCOOP: You cant go incorrect with the dairy-free Cookie Dough Life, featuring ultra-satisfying hunks of cookie dough and chocolate chips throughout.

LE CAFE DE LA PLAGE

Celebs love Cindy Crawford and Owen Wilson flock to Malibu’s Point Dume for Instagram-worthy moments in front of a gorgeous flower wall, as well as handcrafted, refined sugar-free and vegan flavors.

If you’re not up for a beautiful drive up the coast (ahem), you can also discover pints at Erewhon, and they’ll be stocked in Gelson’s starting in mid-July.

THE SCOOP: Try the Lemon Ginger Mint for a shot of refreshment on a beach day.

CRAIG’S

Expect to see and taste a lot more of West Hollywood-based Craig’s Vegan (yes, that Craig, of tony West Hollywood restaurant fame), whose cashew-based pints are made in L.A. with premium add-ins and are cheekily named after local landmarks (Sunset & Strawberry, for instance).

THE SCOOP: Dig into a pint of Killa’ Vanilla, which tastes love you’re dipping a spoon into old-fashioned Breyer’s (in a excellent way).

HUGO’S TACOS

Love soft serve but aren’t large on dairy?

The Studio City and Atwater Village locations of this no-frills, healthy-ish Mexican spot both serve the Frozato, a soft serve-like frozen dessert made from sweet potatoes.

THE SCOOP: Hold it simple with a chocolate and vanilla swirl in a waffle cone.

KIPPY’S

For the past six years, Kippy’s in Venice has served handmade, completely raw, nondairy ice creams and sorbets made from raw coconut cream, organic unused fruit and raw unheated local honey. With more than 10 vegan ice creams — each made from five ingredients or less — and a healthy scoop of trendy superfood toppings (goji berries, bee pollen, hemp seeds), there’s something for everyone.

THE SCOOP: Why drink your Goldenmilk when you could own the turmeric-spiked treat in frozen form?

SALT & STRAW

West Coast purveyor Salt & Straw has increased plant-based options on its rotating menu — hello, Dandelion Hazelnut Cookies and Cream — plus just published an eponymous ice cream cookbook detailing dozens of its most inventive recipes, including a versatile vegan base.

With five locations in Greater Los Angeles, four in S.F., two in San Diego and even one at Anaheims Downtown Disney District, your next scoop should be just around the corner.

THE SCOOP: Get a minty blast with Freckled Mint TCHO-colate Chip, a peppermint coconut ice cream dotted with TCHO’s ethically crafted chocolate.

VAN LEEUWEN

The New York-based chain, which now has four locations in Los Angeles, originally debuted nondairy flavors made from housemade cashew milk, organic coconut milk and cocoa butter in

THE SCOOP: If you’re nut-averse, attempt one of the brand-new oat milk-based flavors, which just debuted in May.

The Vegan Oat Milk Latte is helpful of love your morning cup of joe, only better.

SWEET ROSE CREAMERY

The aptly named and sweetly decorated scoop shops from the Rustic Canyon Group are known for using the highest-quality ingredients for their handmade ice cream, so it follows that the vegan flavors are no diverse. Their vegan Vanilla is made from a coconut cream base infused with vanilla beans, while the dairy-free/vegan Cookie Dough is an oat and coconut cream base made with pure vanilla extract with chunks of already-vegan cookie dough throughout.

THE SCOOP: Go all-out and order a vegan chocolate cake, frosted and filled with German Chocolate ice cream (translation: a coconut cream base blended with Guittard chocolate and covered in mini chocolate chips).

Feature image: The new vegan and dairy-free Cookie Dough ice cream by SWEET ROSE CREAMERY. Photo by Abby Mahler.

This tale originally appeared in the May issue of C Magazine and has been updated as of June 5,

New dairy-free sweet treats by COOLHAUS. Summer-ready flavors by LE CAFE DE LA PLAGE will be available at Gelsons starting in mid-July. CRAIGS VEGAN ice cream flavors Kurstens PB Krunch and Killa Vanilla. Photo by Something Social. The vegan ice creams at KIPPYS are each made from five ingredients or less.

The Dandelion Chocolate Hazelnut Cookies Cream by SALT STRAW. Photo by Salt Straw. A German chocolate ice cream cake by SWEET ROSE CREAMERY. Photo by Erica Allen.

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