What is a cockroach allergy


Facts about cockroaches

Let’s face it, cockroaches aren’t exactly the Bradley Cooper’s of the insect world. However, amongst every the disgusting habits and connotations around cockroaches, they are actually fairly fascinating!

Don’t believe me?

What is a cockroach allergy

Here are 10 facts about cockroaches you need to know!

Cockroaches can trigger asthma

Studies own shown that cockroaches own been linked to triggering asthma as well as other allergies!

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology explain that the saliva, faeces, and shed body parts of cockroaches can trigger asthma when they are kicked up in the air (3). The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America point out that cockroaches contain a protein that is an allergen for numerous people (4), it is said protein which triggers an asthma attack.

Cockroaches are old!

Well, cockroaches themselves aren’t exactly ancient, the average lifespan of an American cockroach is approximately one year, but evidence suggests that these insects own been around for a extremely, extremely endless time.

PennState College of Agricultural Science explains that fossil evidence shows that cockroaches own existed for over 300 million years!

Even dinosaurs and cavemen had to endure cockroach infestations in their homes!

Cockroaches are super fast!

I mean, really fast! Picture the Flash but in cockroach form! Cockroaches are insanely quick. Being the prey of numerous predators, it’s they only defense mechanism. These crawling insects can run up to speeds of 1.5 meters per second (2).

What is a cockroach allergy

To put things into perspective, the human equivalent is around 200 miles per hour!

Cockroaches can squeeze through the tiniest of gaps!

Yep, just love rats and mice, cockroaches can squeeze through the smallest of cracks!

This is every below to their amazing exoskeletons. Cockroaches are capable to fit through a gap as little as a quarter of their body height by flattening their flexible exoskeletons and splaying their legs to the side(2).

Don’t believe me? Watch this video from National Geographic.

Cockroaches can survive a week without a head

Yes, you did read that correct.

Cockroaches can live for approximately one week without a head!

The reason behind this is, that unlike us, cockroaches don’t need their mouths to breathe.

What is a cockroach allergy

Instead, they use spiracles (tiny hole) in their body to inhale and transport oxygen. Combine this with the ability to survive without food for a month and you own an insect that can final without it’s head for a week!

Cockroaches can’t survive a nuclear explosion

Fortunately, the theory of cockroaches being capable to survive a nuclear explosion is just a myth. Well, to some extent.

The myth first appeared after the events in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 where cockroaches were the only survivors.

However, the guys over at MythBusters put an finish to this myth by testing the effect 3 levels of radiation own on German cockroaches.

They discovered that cockroaches can’t actually survive a nuclear explosion as none of the crawling insects survived radiation levels of 100,000 rads (1).

What is a cockroach allergy

To sum up, cockroaches can’t survive a nuclear explosion but they can endure far greater levels of radiation than us humans.

Cockroaches love beer!

Like a student at a university during freshers week, cockroaches love beer! Crazy, right?

Studies own shown that cockroaches are fairly fond of a nice freezing pint of beer, so if you own an infestation on your hands, that 6 pack in your fridge might vanish soon.

What is a cockroach allergy

However, it’s not because they love to party, they are actually attracted to the sugars and hops found in beer.

Cockroaches can’t fly

Even though numerous species of cockroaches own wings, they can’t fly. Well, sort of…

To quote Buzz Lightyear, cockroaches can’t fly but rather “fall with style”. Their wings only permit them to glide and flutter for short distances. It is much quicker for a cockroach to scurry around the put than it is for them to attempt and fly.

Cockroaches are cannibals!

Cockroaches aren’t fussy eaters at every, they will eat beautiful much anything, fruit, glue, faeces, you name it! They own even taken to eating other cockroaches to settle their rumbling stomachs, gross right?!.

Cockroaches cannibalistic tendency is believed to be below to two reasons food, and regulation.

When cockroach infestations reach large numbers and food is scarce, these crawling insects will often turn cannibal as both a source of food and to assist reduce population size.

10. Cockroaches can hold their breath for 40 minutes

Impressive right? Although it might sound impossible, studies own shown that cockroaches can hold their breath for 40 minutes, and can survive underwater for 30 minutes!

A cockroach’s ability to hold their breath for endless periods of time is believed to be a result of regulating water loss. Unlike us, cockroaches don’t use their mouths to breath but rather use little tubes in their body called spiracles.

These are also used to transport water vapor out of their body if they need to conserve water they will simply hold the tubes shut.

Have any more facts about cockroaches? Send us a tweet to @RentokilUK

Bibliography

  • http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/02/08/watch-amazing-video-reveals-why-roaches-are-so-hard-to-squish/
  • http://acaai.org/allergies/types/cockroach-allergies
  • http://www.aafa.org/page/cockroach-allergy.aspx

Testing for IgE antibodies may be useful to establish the diagnosis of an allergic disease and to define the allergens responsible for eliciting signs and symptoms.

Testing also may be useful to identify allergens which may be responsible for allergic disease and/or anaphylactic episode, to confirm sensitization to specific allergens prior to beginning immunotherapy, and to investigate the specificity of allergic reactions to insect venom allergens, drugs, or chemical allergens.

Clinical manifestations of immediate hypersensitivity (allergic) diseases are caused by the release of proinflammatory mediators (histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins) from immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized effector cells (mast cells and basophils) when cell-bound IgE antibodies interact with allergen.

In vitro serum testing for IgE antibodies provides an indication of the immune response to allergen(s) that may be associated with allergic disease.

The allergens chosen for testing often depend upon the age of the patient, history of allergen exposure, season of the year, and clinical manifestations.

What is a cockroach allergy

In individuals predisposed to develop allergic disease(s), the sequence of sensitization and clinical manifestations proceed as follows: eczema and respiratory disease (rhinitis and bronchospasm) in infants and children less than 5 years due to food sensitivity (milk, egg, soy, and wheat proteins) followed by respiratory disease (rhinitis and asthma) in older children and adults due to sensitivity to inhalant allergens (dust mite, mold, and pollen inhalants).

Detection of IgE antibodies in serum (Class 1 or greater) indicates an increased likelihood of allergic disease as opposed to other etiologies and defines the allergens that may be responsible for eliciting signs and symptoms.

The level of IgE antibodies in serum varies directly with the concentration of IgE antibodies expressed as a class score or kU/L.

Testing for IgE antibodies is not useful in patients previously treated with immunotherapy to determine if residual clinical sensitivity exists, or in patients in whom the medical management does not depend upon identification of allergen specificity.

Some individuals with clinically insignificant sensitivity to allergens may own measurable levels of IgE antibodies in serum, and results must be interpreted in the clinical context.

False-positive results for IgE antibodies may happen in patients with markedly elevated serum IgE (>2,500 kU/L) due to nonspecific binding to allergen solid phases.

Homburger HA: Chapter 53: Allergic diseases.

In Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 21st edition. Edited by RA McPherson, MR Pincus. WB Saunders Company, New York, 2007, Part VI, pp 961-971

Testing for IgE antibodies may be useful to establish the diagnosis of an allergic disease and to define the allergens responsible for eliciting signs and symptoms.

What is a cockroach allergy

Testing also may be useful to identify allergens which may be responsible for allergic disease and/or anaphylactic episode, to confirm sensitization to specific allergens prior to beginning immunotherapy, and to investigate the specificity of allergic reactions to insect venom allergens, drugs, or chemical allergens.

Clinical manifestations of immediate hypersensitivity (allergic) diseases are caused by the release of proinflammatory mediators (histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins) from immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized effector cells (mast cells and basophils) when cell-bound IgE antibodies interact with allergen.

In vitro serum testing for IgE antibodies provides an indication of the immune response to allergen(s) that may be associated with allergic disease.

The allergens chosen for testing often depend upon the age of the patient, history of allergen exposure, season of the year, and clinical manifestations.

In individuals predisposed to develop allergic disease(s), the sequence of sensitization and clinical manifestations proceed as follows: eczema and respiratory disease (rhinitis and bronchospasm) in infants and children less than 5 years due to food sensitivity (milk, egg, soy, and wheat proteins) followed by respiratory disease (rhinitis and asthma) in older children and adults due to sensitivity to inhalant allergens (dust mite, mold, and pollen inhalants).

Detection of IgE antibodies in serum (Class 1 or greater) indicates an increased likelihood of allergic disease as opposed to other etiologies and defines the allergens that may be responsible for eliciting signs and symptoms.

The level of IgE antibodies in serum varies directly with the concentration of IgE antibodies expressed as a class score or kU/L.

Testing for IgE antibodies is not useful in patients previously treated with immunotherapy to determine if residual clinical sensitivity exists, or in patients in whom the medical management does not depend upon identification of allergen specificity.

Some individuals with clinically insignificant sensitivity to allergens may own measurable levels of IgE antibodies in serum, and results must be interpreted in the clinical context.

False-positive results for IgE antibodies may happen in patients with markedly elevated serum IgE (>2,500 kU/L) due to nonspecific binding to allergen solid phases.

Homburger HA: Chapter 53: Allergic diseases.

In Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods.

What is a cockroach allergy

21st edition. Edited by RA McPherson, MR Pincus. WB Saunders Company, New York, 2007, Part VI, pp 961-971


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