What fruit is related to latex allergy

<p>This subsection of the ‘Family and domains’ section provides information about the sequence similarity with other proteins.<p><a href=’/help/sequence_similarities’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Sequence similaritiesi

To kiwi fruit protein PKIWI501.


<p>This section describes post-translational modifications (PTMs) and/or processing events.<p><a href=’/help/ptm_processing_section’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>PTM / Processingi

<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/ptm_processing_section»>PTM/processing</a> section describes post-translational modifications (PTMs).

This subsection <strong>complements</strong> the information provided at the sequence level or describes modifications for which <strong>position-specific data is not yet available</strong>.<p><a href=’/help/post-translational_modification’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Post-translational modificationi

The N-terminus is blocked.

Amino acid modifications

Feature key Position(s) DescriptionActions Graphical view Length
<p>This subsection of the ‘PTM / Processing’ section specifies the position and type of each modified residue excluding <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/manual/lipid»>lipids</a>, <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/manual/carbohyd»>glycans</a> and <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/manual/crosslnk»>protein cross-links</a>.<p><a href=’/help/mod_res’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Modified residuei 2 N-acetylalanine 1

Molecule processing

Feature key Position(s) DescriptionActions Graphical view Length
<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/ptm_processing_section»>PTM / Processing</a> section indicates that the initiator methionine is cleaved from the mature protein.<p><a href=’/help/init_met’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Initiator methioninei Removed
<p>This subsection of the ‘PTM / Processing’ section describes the extent of a polypeptide chain in the mature protein following processing.<p><a href=’/help/chain’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>ChainiPRO_0000064561 2 – 151 Major latex allergen Hev b 5AddBLAST 150

Keywords — PTMi

Acetylation

Proteomic databases


<p>This section provides information on the disease(s) and phenotype(s) associated with a protein.<p><a href=’/help/pathology_and_biotech_section’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Pathology & Biotechi

<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/manual/pathology_and_biotech_section»>’Pathology and Biotech'</a> section is used for proteins that cause an allergic reaction in mammals.

We generally specify in which species the protein is allergenic.<p><a href=’/help/allergenic_properties’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Allergenic propertiesi

Causes an allergic reaction in human. Major latex allergen, a major cause of anaphylaxis in susceptible individuals, especially health care workers. 92% of health care workers with latex allergy own IgE specific to the Hev b 5 protein.

<p>UniProtKB Keywords constitute a <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/keywords»>controlled vocabulary</a> with a hierarchical structure.

Keywords summarise the content of a UniProtKB entry and facilitate the search for proteins of interest.<p><a href=’/help/keywords’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Keywords — Diseasei

Allergen

Protein family/group databases

Allergome; a platform for allergen knowledge

More…Allergomei

3316 Hev b 5.0101
389 Hev b 5


Major latex allergen Hev b 5

N/A

Hevea brasiliensis (Para rubber tree) (Siphonia brasiliensis)

Reviewed-Annotation score:

Annotation score:2 out of 5

<p>The annotation score provides a heuristic measure of the annotation content of a UniProtKB entry or proteome.

This score <strong>cannot</strong> be used as a measure of the accuracy of the annotation as we cannot define the ‘correct annotation’ for any given protein.<p><a href=’/help/annotation_score’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>-Experimental evidence at protein leveli <p>This indicates the type of evidence that supports the existence of the protein.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

Note that the ‘protein existence’ evidence does not give information on the accuracy or correctness of the sequence(s) displayed.<p><a href=’/help/protein_existence’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>

Select a section on the left to see content.


<p>This section provides information about the protein and gene name(s) and synonym(s) and about the organism that is the source of the protein sequence.<p><a href=’/help/names_and_taxonomy_section’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Names & Taxonomyi

<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/names_and_taxonomy_section»>Names and taxonomy</a> section provides an exhaustive list of every names of the protein, from commonly used to obsolete, to permit unambiguous identification of a protein.<p><a href=’/help/protein_names’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Protein namesi

Recommended name:

Major latex allergen Hev b 5

Alternative name(s):

Allergen: Hev b 5

<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/names_and_taxonomy_section»>Names and taxonomy</a> section provides information on the name(s) of the organism that is the source of the protein sequence.<p><a href=’/help/organism-name’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Organismi Hevea brasiliensis (Para rubber tree) (Siphonia brasiliensis)
<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/names_and_taxonomy_section»>Names and taxonomy</a> section shows the unique identifier assigned by the NCBI to the source organism of the protein.

This is known as the ‘taxonomic identifier’ or ‘taxid’.<p><a href=’/help/taxonomic_identifier’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Taxonomic identifieri

3981 [NCBI]
<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/names_and_taxonomy_section»>Names and taxonomy</a> section contains the taxonomic hierarchical classification lineage of the source organism. It lists the nodes as they appear top-down in the taxonomic tree, with the more general grouping listed first.<p><a href=’/help/taxonomic_lineage’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Taxonomic lineagei cellular organisms › Eukaryota › Viridiplantae › Streptophyta › Streptophytina › Embryophyta › Tracheophyta › Euphyllophyta › Spermatophyta › Magnoliopsida › Mesangiospermae › eudicotyledons › Gunneridae › Pentapetalae › rosids › fabids › Malpighiales › Euphorbiaceae › Crotonoideae › Micrandreae › Hevea


Research substantiates reports

Blanco et al.

conducted a prospective study in their outpatient clinic in 25 patients diagnosed with latex allergy, published in 1994.They used a clinical questionnaire, skin-prick tests, skin test with a latex extract, and identification of entire and specific IgE to assist ascertain clinical characteristics and cross-reactivity. Of the 23 women and 2 men in the study (mean age 33, plus or minus 9 years), 9 (36%) experienced latex-induced reactions characterized by systemic anaphylaxis. In 13 patients (52%), 42 food allergies were identified, and 23 included systemic anaphylaxis.

Avocado (9), chestnut (9), banana (7), kiwi (5), and papaya (3) were the most common foods to cause hypersensitivities. The researchers concluded that their little study supported the reality of a “latex-fruit syndrome.”3

Another study aimed to characterize the cross-reactivity of latex and foods and assess clinical significance. Beezhold et al. examined 47 patients allergic to latex and 46 nonallergic controls. The investigators found immunologic reactivity to foods to be prevalent (33 latex-allergic patients and seven controls), with 27% of food skin-prick tests positive in the latex-allergic group.

In addition, clinical symptoms were linked to 27% of positive skin-prick tests. Among the 17 patients who displayed clinical allergies to at least one food, 14 showed local sensitivity reactions, with anaphylaxis noted in 11. Avocado (53%), potato (40%), banana (38%), tomato (28%), chestnut (28%), and kiwi (17%) were the foods most frequently cited for provoking a skin test reaction. The authors observed extensive cross-reactivity between latex sensitivity and specific foods, with potatoes and tomatoes reported for the first time.4

In 1997, Brehler et al. studied serum samples from 136 patients whose immediate hypersensitivity to latex proteins was clinically observable and documented.

The samples were assessed for IgE antibodies against several fruits, with fruit-specific IgE antibodies recorded in 69.1%. Radioallergosorbent (RAST) -inhibition tests yielded the recognition of cross-reacting IgE antibodies in latex and multiple fruit allergens: avocado, banana, chestnut, fig, kiwi, mango, melon, papaya, passion fruit, peach, pineapple, and tomato.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

The investigators recorded 112 intolerance reactions and noted that 42.5% of their patients reported allergic symptoms after consuming these fruits. Fruit-specific IgE antibodies were detected in only 32.1% of these patients, suggesting to the researchers that serologic tests were suboptimal in forecasting food hypersensitivities in patients who are allergic to latex.5


Cross-reactivity with banana

Mäkinen-Kiljunen studied 47 patients to investigate banana allergy in patients with latex allergy in 1994, measuring latex-, banana-, and pollen-specific (birch, timothy, and mugwort) IgE.

Thirty-one patients were also given skin-prick tests with banana and were queried about reactions after consuming bananas.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

Of the 47 sera samples, latex RAST results were positive in 31 and banana RAST results in 26. RAST results from latex and banana were correlated (25 of the 31 latex RAST-positive samples were also banana RAST-positive), but not with pollen. Sixteen of the 31 patients who ate banana reported symptoms, and 11 of the 31 patients given the banana skin-prick test showed positive results. The author confirmed the cross-reactivity of IgE antibodies for latex and banana, identifying for the first time a structurally similar antigen/allergen as at least one antigen from banana fused with an antigen from latex in crossed-line immunoelectrophoresis.6

In 1998, Mikkola et al.

investigated whether proteins similar to hevein, a major natural rubber latex allergen, are present in banana and account for cross-reactivity between these botanicals. Immunoblotting revealed that 9 of 15 sera from latex-allergic patients with IgE to hevein also bound to 32- and 33-kd banana proteins.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

Studies using ELISA [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay] showed that the common presentation of hypersensitivity to banana among patients allergic to latex could be attributed to cross-reacting IgE antibodies binding to epitopes in hevein and in the then-newly identified hevein-like endochitinase found in banana.7

AF069: Bet v 1 family

Links to Pfam

Family-defining Pfam domains (at least one of these domains is present in each family member):

Pfam domain Pfam clan
PF00407 Pathogenesis-related protein Bet v I family CL0209 Bet V 1 love

References

  • Vieths S, Scheurer S, Ballmer-Weber B:
    Current understanding of cross-reactivity of food allergens and pollen.
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 2002, 964, 47-68.

    [PubMed]

  • Guhsl EE, Hofstetter G, Hemmer W, Ebner C, Vieths S, Vogel L, Breiteneder H, Radauer C:
    Vig r 6, the cytokinin-specific binding protein from mung bean (Vigna radiata) sprouts, cross-reacts with Bet v 1-related allergens and binds IgE from birch pollen allergic patients’ sera.
    Mol Nutr Food Res 2014, 58, 625-34. [PubMed][Full Text]
  • Markovic-Housley Z, Degano M, Lamba D, von Roepenack-Lahaye E, Clemens S, Susani M, Ferreira F, Scheiner O, Breiteneder H:
    Crystal structure of a hypoallergenic isoform of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and its likely biological function as a plant steroid carrier.
    J Mol Biol 2003, 325, 123-33.

    [PubMed]

  • Sliwiak J, Dolot R, Michalska K, Szpotkowski K, Bujacz G, Sikorski M, Jaskolski M:
    Crystallographic and CD probing of ligand-induced conformational changes in a plant PR-10 protein.
    J Struct Biol 2016, 193, 55-66. [PubMed][Full Text]
  • Park CJ, Kim KJ, Shin R, Park JM, Shin YC, Paek KH:
    Pathogenesis-related protein 10 isolated from boiling pepper functions as a ribonuclease in an antiviral pathway.
    Plant J 2004, 37, 186-98. [PubMed]
  • Michalska K, Fernandes H, Sikorski M, Jaskolski M:
    Crystal structure of Hyp-1, a St. John’s wort protein implicated in the biosynthesis of hypericin.
    J Struct Biol 2010, 169, 161-71.

    [PubMed][Full Text]

  • Radauer C, Lackner P, Breiteneder H:
    The Bet v 1 fold: an ancient, versatile scaffold for binding of large, hydrophobic ligands.
    BMC Evol Biol 2008, 8, 286. [PubMed][Full Text]
  • Fernandes H, Michalska K, Sikorski M, Jaskolski M:
    Structural and functional aspects of PR-10 proteins.
    FEBS J 2013, 280, 1169-99. [PubMed][Full Text]
  • Osmark P, Boyle B, Brisson N:
    Sequential and structural homology between intracellular pathogenesis-related proteins and a group of latex proteins.
    Plant Mol Biol 1998, 38, 1243-6. [PubMed]
  • Chen JY, Dai XF:
    Cloning and characterization of the Gossypium hirsutum major latex protein gene and functional analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.
    Planta 2010, 231, 861-73.

    [PubMed][Full Text]

  • Seutter von Loetzen C, Hoffmann T, Hartl MJ, Schweimer K, Schwab W, Rosch P, Hartl-Spiegelhauer O:
    Secret of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1: identification of the physiological ligand.
    Biochem J 2014, 457, 379-90. [PubMed][Full Text]
  • D’Avino R, Bernardi ML, Wallner M, Palazzo P, Camardella L, Tuppo L, Alessandri C, Breiteneder H, Ferreira F, Ciardiello MA, Mari A:
    Kiwifruit Act d 11 is the first member of the ripening-related protein family identified as an allergen.
    Allergy 2011, 66, 870-7.

    [PubMed][Full Text]

[top]

Biochemical properties

Bet v 1-related proteins are widely distributed among vascular plants. The family was classified by sequence similarity into two large and several little subfamilies showing low levels of sequence identity but conserved structures [1]. The largest of these is the pathogenesis-related protein family PR-10 [2]. The expression of these proteins is either induced by pathogen attack or abiotic stress or developmentally regulated.

PR-10 proteins are expressed in high concentrations in reproductive tissues such as pollen, seeds and fruits. The biochemical function of most PR-10 proteins is unknown. For some PR-10 subfamily members an enzymatic function as ribonuclease [3] or oxidative coupling enzyme involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites was shown [4]. Love every members of the Bet v 1-family, PR-10 proteins contain a large ligand-binding cavity that can accommodate diverse ligands including plant steroids [5], cytokinins [6] and flavonoids [7].

The other large subfamily is a group of major latex proteins and ripening-related proteins (MLP/RRP) first described in the latex of opium poppy [8]. Their biologic function is unknown, but they appear to own a role in defense against biotic and abiotic stress [9].

Allergens from this family

The major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, is a member of the PR-10 family. Closely-related, cross-reactive allergens were found in the pollen of other trees from the order Fagales such as hazel, alder, oak and chestnut.

Numerous birch pollen-allergic patients show allergic reactions to various fruits and vegetables, which are caused by IgE cross-reactivity between Bet v 1 and homologous allergens from plant foods [10]. Most Bet v 1-related food allergens were found in members of certain plant families: Rosaceae (apple, pear, rock fruits), Apiaceae (celery, carrot), and Fabaceae (soybean, peanut). Only two Bet v 1-related allergens were identified exterior the PR-10 subfamily. Vig r 6 is a minor allergen from mung bean and member of the cytokinin-specific binding proteins subfamily, a little subfamily distantly related to the PR-10 group [11].

What fruit is related to latex allergy

Act d 11 is a minor kiwifruit allergen belonging to the MLP/RRP subfamily [12].

[top]

Links to Wikipedia

[top]

If you own updates or corrections for this entry, please contact the site istrator: christian.radauer@meduniwien.ac.at .

Food Allergy Section

JMAChaipersonIoanaAgache-Brumaru

Prevalence and risk factors for latex-fruit syndrome in patients with latex allergy

A Gaspar, G Pires, S Marques, A M Romeira, , V Matos, V Loureiro, M Morais-Almeida, J Rosado-Pinto

, Immunoallergy Department,

Birch pollen related allergy to soybean: clinical investigations and molecular characterisation of allergens

D Mittag1, , L Vogel2, W M Becker3, H P Rihs4, B Wüthrich1, B K Ballmer1

1University Hospital Zuerich, Allergy Unit, Department of Dermatology, Zuerich, Switzerland; 2Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Department of Allergology, Langen, Germany; 3Research CenterBorstel, Biochemical and Molecular Allergology, Borstel, Germany; 4Ruhr University, Research Unit for Occupational Medicine, Bochum, Germany

Transient versus persistent cow’s milk allergy and development of other allergic diseases

, G Sampaio, S Prates, M Morais Almeida, J Rosado Pinto

, Immunoallergy Department,

Sheep’sand goat’s milk allergy in the absence of cow’s milk allergy

P Martins, L M Borrego, G Pires, P Leiria-Pinto, J Rosado-Pinto

, Immunoallergy Department,

Flow cytometricbasophil allergen stimulation test (FAST) in food allergy

, A Bossios, N G Papadopoulos, , , D Gourgiotis, P

, Allergy Unit, 2nd Dpt of Pediatrics,

Is lupine flour a safe replacement for soy in food?

K A B Peeters, C A F Bruijnzeel-Koomen, A C Knulst

, Department of Dermatology/ Allergology, , The

The prevalence of food allergy at children up to 5 years with atopic dermatitis in Moscow

A Tarnakina, M Mokronosova

Mechnikov’s Research Institute for Vaccines and Sera, Allergological Department,

IgE formation to digestion-sensitive fish proteins under antacid medication: A true food allergy model in Balb/c mice

E Untersmayr1, I Schoell1, I Swoboda2, W J Beil3, E Foerster-Waldl4, A Riemer1, S Spitzauer2, L K Poulsen5, G Boltz-Nitulescu3, O Scheiner3, E Jensen-Jarolim3

1University of , Department of Pathophysiology, ; 2University of , Department of Clin.

Chem. and Lab. Medicine, Vienna, Austria; 3University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna, Austria; 4University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics and Juvenile Medicine, Vienna, Austria; 5Rigshospital, Laboratory for Med. Allergology, Kopenhagen, Denmark

Partial characterization of basic pepsin-resistant banana allergen

M Gavrovic-Jankulovic1, T Cirkovic1, O Vuckovic2, D Petrovic-Djergovic2, M Atanaskovic-Markovic3, R M Jankov1

1Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry, Belgrade, Yugoslavia; 2Institute for Immunology and Virology Torlak, Allergy, Belgrade, Yugoslavia; 3University Childrens Hospital, Allergology, Belgrade, Yugoslavia

Audit on the prescription of self-injection adrenaline

B F Bouteloup

Allergist,

This is an exciting question.

Bananas own little amounts of a protein called Chitinase (Chitinase — Wikipedia).

Allergies are almost always from proteins, so Chitinase is probably the culprit. How would you know? Well other sources of Chitinase are kiwi and avocado, so if someone has a problem with bananas, they might own a problem with kiwi/avocado too. Also, for whatever reason, latex.

If someone has a reaction to bananas but “NOT” latex and/or NOT kiwi/avocado, what else? Well there is fructose. I made a video talking about fructose malabsorption on my YouTube channel DorkSideCookies, but the short of it is that some people lack the ability to process fructose and/or lack the ability to process large amounts of fructose.

That wouldn’t be a problem per se, but sending unprocessed sugar directly into the intestines is a excellent way to create a gut flora bloom that can cause the obvious problems love bloating and gas, but can also cause less obvious problems love blocking serotonin production which can cause depression, moodiness, and other mental-related issues.

Personally while I can handle a banana a day (and I do), too numerous strawberries make me ill, so I would discover it unlikely to blame bananas for fructose malabsorption-related issues, but everyone might be diverse.

A excellent test to determine possible fructose problems is whether a person can handle chicory root (also known as inulin).

You’ll discover chicory root/inulin laced products in the breakfast aisle labeled generally as “high fiber” or “extra fiber”. Anything with chicory root/inulin will give me a “bad day” within about 3–4 hours of eating it.

There are a variety of other chemicals in bananas obviously, and its theoretically possible to own an allergy (more likely a food intolerance) to those other chemicals, but I’d focus on chitinase first, then fructose second.

Good luck!

[top]

Biochemical properties

Bet v 1-related proteins are widely distributed among vascular plants.

The family was classified by sequence similarity into two large and several little subfamilies showing low levels of sequence identity but conserved structures [1]. The largest of these is the pathogenesis-related protein family PR-10 [2]. The expression of these proteins is either induced by pathogen attack or abiotic stress or developmentally regulated.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

PR-10 proteins are expressed in high concentrations in reproductive tissues such as pollen, seeds and fruits. The biochemical function of most PR-10 proteins is unknown.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

For some PR-10 subfamily members an enzymatic function as ribonuclease [3] or oxidative coupling enzyme involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites was shown [4]. Love every members of the Bet v 1-family, PR-10 proteins contain a large ligand-binding cavity that can accommodate diverse ligands including plant steroids [5], cytokinins [6] and flavonoids [7]. The other large subfamily is a group of major latex proteins and ripening-related proteins (MLP/RRP) first described in the latex of opium poppy [8]. Their biologic function is unknown, but they appear to own a role in defense against biotic and abiotic stress [9].

Allergens from this family

The major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, is a member of the PR-10 family. Closely-related, cross-reactive allergens were found in the pollen of other trees from the order Fagales such as hazel, alder, oak and chestnut. Numerous birch pollen-allergic patients show allergic reactions to various fruits and vegetables, which are caused by IgE cross-reactivity between Bet v 1 and homologous allergens from plant foods [10]. Most Bet v 1-related food allergens were found in members of certain plant families: Rosaceae (apple, pear, rock fruits), Apiaceae (celery, carrot), and Fabaceae (soybean, peanut).

Only two Bet v 1-related allergens were identified exterior the PR-10 subfamily. Vig r 6 is a minor allergen from mung bean and member of the cytokinin-specific binding proteins subfamily, a little subfamily distantly related to the PR-10 group [11]. Act d 11 is a minor kiwifruit allergen belonging to the MLP/RRP subfamily [12].

[top]

Links to Wikipedia

[top]

If you own updates or corrections for this entry, please contact the site istrator: christian.radauer@meduniwien.ac.at .

Food Allergy Section

JMAChaipersonIoanaAgache-Brumaru

Prevalence and risk factors for latex-fruit syndrome in patients with latex allergy

A Gaspar, G Pires, S Marques, A M Romeira, , V Matos, V Loureiro, M Morais-Almeida, J Rosado-Pinto

, Immunoallergy Department,

Birch pollen related allergy to soybean: clinical investigations and molecular characterisation of allergens

D Mittag1, , L Vogel2, W M Becker3, H P Rihs4, B Wüthrich1, B K Ballmer1

1University Hospital Zuerich, Allergy Unit, Department of Dermatology, Zuerich, Switzerland; 2Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Department of Allergology, Langen, Germany; 3Research CenterBorstel, Biochemical and Molecular Allergology, Borstel, Germany; 4Ruhr University, Research Unit for Occupational Medicine, Bochum, Germany

Transient versus persistent cow’s milk allergy and development of other allergic diseases

, G Sampaio, S Prates, M Morais Almeida, J Rosado Pinto

, Immunoallergy Department,

Sheep’sand goat’s milk allergy in the absence of cow’s milk allergy

P Martins, L M Borrego, G Pires, P Leiria-Pinto, J Rosado-Pinto

, Immunoallergy Department,

Flow cytometricbasophil allergen stimulation test (FAST) in food allergy

, A Bossios, N G Papadopoulos, , , D Gourgiotis, P

, Allergy Unit, 2nd Dpt of Pediatrics,

Is lupine flour a safe replacement for soy in food?

K A B Peeters, C A F Bruijnzeel-Koomen, A C Knulst

, Department of Dermatology/ Allergology, , The

The prevalence of food allergy at children up to 5 years with atopic dermatitis in Moscow

A Tarnakina, M Mokronosova

Mechnikov’s Research Institute for Vaccines and Sera, Allergological Department,

IgE formation to digestion-sensitive fish proteins under antacid medication: A true food allergy model in Balb/c mice

E Untersmayr1, I Schoell1, I Swoboda2, W J Beil3, E Foerster-Waldl4, A Riemer1, S Spitzauer2, L K Poulsen5, G Boltz-Nitulescu3, O Scheiner3, E Jensen-Jarolim3

1University of , Department of Pathophysiology, ; 2University of , Department of Clin.

Chem. and Lab. Medicine, Vienna, Austria; 3University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna, Austria; 4University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics and Juvenile Medicine, Vienna, Austria; 5Rigshospital, Laboratory for Med. Allergology, Kopenhagen, Denmark

Partial characterization of basic pepsin-resistant banana allergen

M Gavrovic-Jankulovic1, T Cirkovic1, O Vuckovic2, D Petrovic-Djergovic2, M Atanaskovic-Markovic3, R M Jankov1

1Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry, Belgrade, Yugoslavia; 2Institute for Immunology and Virology Torlak, Allergy, Belgrade, Yugoslavia; 3University Childrens Hospital, Allergology, Belgrade, Yugoslavia

Audit on the prescription of self-injection adrenaline

B F Bouteloup

Allergist,

This is an exciting question.

Bananas own little amounts of a protein called Chitinase (Chitinase — Wikipedia).

Allergies are almost always from proteins, so Chitinase is probably the culprit. How would you know? Well other sources of Chitinase are kiwi and avocado, so if someone has a problem with bananas, they might own a problem with kiwi/avocado too. Also, for whatever reason, latex.

If someone has a reaction to bananas but “NOT” latex and/or NOT kiwi/avocado, what else? Well there is fructose. I made a video talking about fructose malabsorption on my YouTube channel DorkSideCookies, but the short of it is that some people lack the ability to process fructose and/or lack the ability to process large amounts of fructose.

That wouldn’t be a problem per se, but sending unprocessed sugar directly into the intestines is a excellent way to create a gut flora bloom that can cause the obvious problems love bloating and gas, but can also cause less obvious problems love blocking serotonin production which can cause depression, moodiness, and other mental-related issues.

Personally while I can handle a banana a day (and I do), too numerous strawberries make me ill, so I would discover it unlikely to blame bananas for fructose malabsorption-related issues, but everyone might be diverse.

What fruit is related to latex allergy

A excellent test to determine possible fructose problems is whether a person can handle chicory root (also known as inulin).

You’ll discover chicory root/inulin laced products in the breakfast aisle labeled generally as “high fiber” or “extra fiber”. Anything with chicory root/inulin will give me a “bad day” within about 3–4 hours of eating it.

There are a variety of other chemicals in bananas obviously, and its theoretically possible to own an allergy (more likely a food intolerance) to those other chemicals, but I’d focus on chitinase first, then fructose second.

Good luck!


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