What food allergies cause stomach pain

It is not simple to determine whether somebody has a food intolerance or allergy because the signs and symptoms often overlap. Certain patterns in the symptoms can assist a doctor distinguish between the two. In the vast majority of cases, food intolerance symptoms take much longer to appear than food allergies.

Patients are advised to hold a diary and record below which foods are eaten, what the symptoms were love, and when they appeared. The data in the diary can assist a dietician or doctor identify which foods are causing adverse reactions, and what steps to take.

Apart from lactose intolerance and celiac disease, there is no precise, dependable, and validated test to identify food intolerance.

The best diagnostic tool is an exclusion diet, also known as an elimination or diagnostic diet.

Intolerance to regularly-eaten foods may result in adverse reactions running into each other. When this occurs, it is hard to identify which foods are to blame. There is a higher risk that a chronic condition or disease is erroneously diagnosed.

Exclusion diets are extremely useful in isolating the culprit foods.

In a typical exclusion diet, the suspected food is removed from the diet for a set period, generally between 2 weeks and 2 months.

If during this period the adverse reactions resolve, it becomes more likely that the culprit has been found. This can be further confirmed if it is then reintroduced and symptoms return.

The doctor may recommend a skin test and/or a blood test to law out a food allergy:

  1. Skin prick test — this determines the patient's reaction to a specific food. A little quantity of the suspected food is placed on the patient's back or forearm. The skin is pricked with a needle, allowing some of its substance to penetrate under the skin surface.

    Allergic people will react with a raised bump. However, skin prick tests are not percent reliable.

  2. Blood test — this measures levels of IgE (immunoglobulin E) antibodies. These tests are not percent dependable either. The presence of IgE antibodies may be a part of the normal human response and indicate tolerance, rather than an adverse reaction, according to a study published in CMAJ.

The best current treatment for food intolerance is to either avoid certain foods or eat them less often and in smaller amounts, as well as taking supplements that may assist digestion.

What food allergies cause stomach pain


If your kid has symptoms after eating certain foods, he or she may own a food allergy.

A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a certain food as harmful and reacts by causing symptoms. This is an allergic reaction. Foods that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

Two Categories of Food Allergies

  • Skin rash, itching, hives
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  • The symptoms are varied and can include, migraine, cough, and stomachache
  • Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food.

    This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody. Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.

  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.
  • Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Feeling love something terrible is about to happen
  • Symptoms of food intolerance tend to take longer to appear than symptoms of allergies
  • Some food intolerance is caused by the lack of a specific enzyme

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Skin rash, itching, hives
  2. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick.

Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine.

What food allergies cause stomach pain

This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods. For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish.

Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods.

Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food.

In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed. In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy.

They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus.

The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach.

What food allergies cause stomach pain

An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy.

It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital.

The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk. This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness.

When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December

Food intolerance, also known as non-IgE mediated food hypersensitivity or non-allergic food hypersensitivity, refers to difficulty in digesting certain foods. It is significant to note that food intolerance is diverse from food allergy.

Food allergies trigger the immune system, while food intolerance does not. Some people suffer digestive problems after eating certain foods, even though their immune system has not reacted — there is no histamine response.

Foods most commonly associated with food intolerance include dairy products, grains that contain gluten, and foods that cause intestinal gas buildup, such as beans and cabbage.

Fast facts on food intolerance

Here are some key points about food intolerance.

More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  1. Symptoms of food intolerance tend to take longer to appear than symptoms of allergies
  2. The symptoms are varied and can include, migraine, cough, and stomachache
  3. Some food intolerance is caused by the lack of a specific enzyme

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat. The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain.

Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Skin rash, itching, hives
  2. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis).

What food allergies cause stomach pain

This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods.

For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish.

What food allergies cause stomach pain

Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods.

Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas.

What food allergies cause stomach pain

That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract.

Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed. In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance.

Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus.

The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy.

It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock.

Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk. This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine.

It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools.

What food allergies cause stomach pain

Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December

Food intolerance, also known as non-IgE mediated food hypersensitivity or non-allergic food hypersensitivity, refers to difficulty in digesting certain foods. It is significant to note that food intolerance is diverse from food allergy.

Food allergies trigger the immune system, while food intolerance does not.

Some people suffer digestive problems after eating certain foods, even though their immune system has not reacted — there is no histamine response.

Foods most commonly associated with food intolerance include dairy products, grains that contain gluten, and foods that cause intestinal gas buildup, such as beans and cabbage.

Fast facts on food intolerance

Here are some key points about food intolerance. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  1. Symptoms of food intolerance tend to take longer to appear than symptoms of allergies
  2. The symptoms are varied and can include, migraine, cough, and stomachache
  3. Some food intolerance is caused by the lack of a specific enzyme


Symptoms

It can be hard to determine whether the patient has a food intolerance or an allergy because the signs and symptoms often overlap.

According to James Li, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic allergy specialist, when it is an allergy, even little amounts result in symptoms, as may be the case with peanuts. Whereas, with food intolerance, tiny amounts will generally own no effect.

The symptoms of food intolerance generally take longer to emerge, compared to food allergies.

Onset typically occurs several hours after ingesting the offending food or compound and may persist for several hours or days.

In some cases, symptoms may take 48 hours to reach.

Some people are intolerant to several groups of foods, making it harder for doctors to determine whether it might be a chronic illness or food intolerance. Identifying which foods are the culprits can take a endless time.

According to the Australian NSW Food Authority, the following are the most common symptoms of food intolerance:

  1. Migraines
  2. Cough
  3. Runny nose
  4. Irritable bowel
  5. Headaches
  6. Bloating
  7. Feeling under the weather
  8. Stomach ache
  9. Hives


Food additives and intolerance

Food additive intolerance has been a steadily-growing problem over the final thirty years because more and more foods contain additives.

Even so, food additive intolerance is not estimated to affect more than 1 percent of people.

Additives are used to enhance flavors, make foods glance more appealing, and to increase their shelf life. Examples of food additives include:

  1. Artificial colorings
  2. Artificial flavorings
  3. Emulsifiers
  4. Preservatives
  5. Antioxidants
  6. Flavor enhancers
  7. Sweeteners

Of the thousands of additives used in the food industry, a relatively little number are thought to cause problems. The following food additives are known to cause adverse reactions in people:

  1. Nitrates — known to cause itching and skin rashes.

    Processed meats are generally high in nitrates and nitrites.

  2. MSG (monosodium glutamate) — used as a flavor enhancer. Known to cause headaches.
  3. Sulfites — used as a food preserver or enhancer. Commonly used in wines. In the United States and European Union, wines bottled after and , respectively, must state on their labels if they contain sulfites at more than 10 parts per million. A German study found that about 7 percent of people own an intolerance to wine.
  4. Some colorings — especially carmine (red) and annatto (yellow).


Causes

There can be numerous causes of food intolerance, and we will take a glance at each of these in turn.

1) Absence of an enzyme

Enzymes are needed to digest foods fully. If some of these enzymes are missing, or insufficient, proper digestion may be undermined.

People who are lactose intolerant do not own enough lactase, an enzyme that breaks below milk sugar (lactose) into smaller molecules that the body can break below further and absorb through the intestine. If lactose remains in the digestive tract, it can cause spasm, stomachache, bloating, diarrhea, and gas.

People with an allergy to milk protein own similar symptoms to those with lactose intolerance; that is why lactose intolerant individuals are commonly misdiagnosed as allergic.

Researchers from Mary Bridge Children's Hospital and Health Middle in Tacoma, WA, found that fructose intolerance is common in children with recurrent or functional abdominal pain.

Almost every foods require an enzyme for proper digestion. According to the British Allergy Foundation, enzyme deficiencies are a common cause of food intolerance.

2) Chemical causes of food intolerance

Certain chemicals in foods and drinks can cause intolerance, including amines in some cheeses, and caffeine in coffee, tea, and chocolates. Some people are more susceptible to these chemicals than others.

3) Food poisoning — toxins

Some foods own naturally-occurring chemicals that can own a toxic effect on humans, causing diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting.

Undercooked beans own aflatoxins that can cause extremely unpleasant digestive problems. Fully cooked beans do not own the toxin. Hence, people may wonder why they react to beans after one meal, and not after another.

4) Natural occurrence of histamine in some foods

Some foods, such as fish that has not been stored properly, can own an accumulation of histamine as they "rot." A number of people are particularly sensitive to this naturally-occurring histamine and develop skin rashes, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, vomiting, and nausea.

Often, the symptoms are similar to anaphylaxis (a strong allergic reaction).

5) Salicylates are present in numerous foods

Salicylate intolerance, also known as salicylate sensitivity, occurs when somebody reacts to normal amounts of ingested salicylate.

Salicylates are derivatives of salicylic acid, which occurs naturally in plants as a defense mechanism against harmful bacteria, fungi, insects, and diseases.

The chemicals are found in numerous foods and most people can consume salicylate-containing foods without any adverse effects. However, some people suffer symptoms after eating large amounts. Salicylate intolerant individuals should avoid foods that contain high levels.

Salicylates are present in most plant-sourced foods, including the majority of fruits and vegetables, spices, herbs, tea, and flavor additives. Mint-flavoring, tomato sauce, berries, and citrus fruits own particularly high levels.

Processed foods with flavor additives are generally high in salicylates as well.


Types

Some common types of food intolerance are:

  1. wheat
  2. gluten
  3. caffeine
  4. histamine, present in mushrooms, pickles, and cured food
  5. lactose
  6. additives such as artificial sweetners, coloring, or other flavorings

Some people experience a reaction after eating bread, but this does not necessarily indicate a gluten intolerance.

Anyone who suspects they may own a gluten intolerance should see a doctor before giving up gluten, as cereals can be an significant source of various nutrients.


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