What food allergies cause headaches

Unfortunately, the only way to treat any of these allergies is to avoid foods that contain the problematic ingredients.

What food allergies cause headaches

It is significant to be certain to read labels not only on foods and medications but on personal, household and cosmetic items as well. Once you are certain to remove these from your lifestyle, you should be symptom-free.

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Pinpoint Your Food Sensitivities – Without Going to a Lab or Clinic

Using EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test results to guide your elimination diet can be an effective, simple way to pinpoint your food sensitivities – and you can do it every at home (instead of going to a lab or clinic for IgG testing).

If that’s something you’re interested in, simply go here now to study more about this at-home Food Sensitivity Test.

Using EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test results to guide your elimination diet can be an effective, simple way to pinpoint your food sensitivities.

Many people suffer from headaches, more or less frequently. There are more than 200 types of headaches; the most common ones are tension headache and migraine. The specific forms of headaches differ in frequency, duration and manifestation or in the type of pain (throbbing, hammering, pressing etc.).

Migraine and tension headache are classified as so-called primary headaches; they are seen as a clinical picture of its own that can be treated directly.

The causes of primary headaches are still unclear. A large number of people affected by migraine suspect that foods could trigger the attacks. A delayed IgG food allergy might be such a trigger. The ImuPro concept may thus be a useful approach: It combines an IgG food allergy test and personalised nutritional guidelines.

Study more.

Migraine is a complicated neurological picture. People affected generally suffer from long-lasting and intense headaches. Migraine headaches cause throbbing or pulsating pain, generally on only one side of the head. They can interfere with sleep, work and other everyday activities and may happen as often as several times per week or as rarely as once or twice a year. A migraine most often begins at puberty and mostly affects those aged between 35 and 45 years.

The two common forms of migraine are called migraine without aura and with aura.

The latter is a type of migraine that has warning signs before the pain begins, called an aura. Symptoms can include seeing flashing lights, blind spots, difficulty focusing on things, balance and co-ordination problems, weakness stiffness and tingling in the neck, shoulders or limbs as well as difficulty speaking. The aura stage of the migraine often lasts from around 15 minutes to an hour. Around 1 in 5 people who experience migraines get aura symptoms.

It is estimated that 1 in every 7 people around the globe suffer from migraines†, making it the third most common disease in the world.

Research has also revealed that migraines affect twice as numerous women as men and they affect adults and children of every ages.

The World Health Organisation classifies headache as a major health disorder and has rated migraine amongst the top 20 most disabling lifetime conditions.

A migraine attack can final for between 4 and 72 hours and sufferers experience an average of 13 attacks each year.†

So what is the link between migraine and food intolerance and how could this link lead to answers and a resolution for your clients?

Known causes of a migraine include disturbed sleep patterns, stress, and reactions to certain foods and it is the latter that is regarded as one of the easiest to control.

There are numerous foods which may act as a trigger and could cause migraines.

The case for a food intolerance causing migraines

A survey of a 1,000 people suffering with migraine by the charity Migraine Action revealed that over two thirds of Migraine Action members affected by frequent migraine attacks believe that certain foods could be the cause.

The gold standard method for confirming food reactions is the elimination diet and challenge.

This involves eating a restricted diet over a period of time. If there is no improvement in the frequency or severity of your migraines during this time, it is assumed that the food type that has been restricted is not contributing to the symptoms (migraines), and the process is repeated with another food type.

This method can be extremely time consuming, and it is extremely hard to test every the diverse combinations of food types that may be contributing to the problem. A food intolerance* test can highlight a person’s trigger foods without the need for eliminating individual foods one by one and can form the basis of a fast-track elimination diet.

The potential that food intolerance* testing offers migraine sufferers has been demonstrated in several studies (see references below).

The most recent of these, published in the Headache Journal, concluded that the number and severity of migraine attacks was significantly reduced when the subject followed an IgG guided elimination diet.4

The Migraine Action survey 2011 meanwhile found that 85 percent of people affected by debilitating migraines had their symptoms reduced, and quality of life improved, once their food triggers were discovered and avoided.

Additional research from the University of York, the largest clinical trial of its helpful in migraine-like headaches, published in the Nutrition Journal, has further supported the Migraine Action findings.

It uncovered that the frequency of migraine attacks was slashed by almost a quarter (23%) over 4 weeks when the Lorisian food-specific antibodies test was carried out to identify a sufferer’s food triggers. For additional references please see below.

How can I test my clients for food intolerances*?

Do you own a question about food intolerance? Are you interested in offering tests to your clients? To discover out more about Lorisian and our food intolerance* testing, please contact our friendly team.

How can I test my clients for food intolerances*?

Do you own a question about food intolerance?

What food allergies cause headaches

Are you interested in offering tests to your clients? To discover out more about Lorisian and our food intolerance* testing, please contact our friendly team.

References

1. Further analysis of data published originally as Hardman G and Hart G (2007) Dietary advice based on food-specific IgG results. Nutrition and Food Science 37: 16-23.

2. Mitchell N et al (2011) Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine love headaches.

Nutrition Journal 10: 85.

3. Alpay K et al (2010) Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: a clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial. Cephalagia 30:829-37. Link.

4. Aydinlar E et al (2013) IgG-based elimination diet in migraine plus IBS. Headache 53:514-25. Link.

5. Rees T et al (2005) A prospective audit of food intolerance among migraine consumers in primary care clinical practice.

What food allergies cause headaches

Headache Care 2, 11-14. Link.

*Lorisian define food intolerance as a food-specific IgG antibody reaction. Our information is intended to provide nutritional advice for dietary optimisation. Lorisian do not claim to treat or cure your client’s symptoms and recommend that they discuss any medical concerns they may own with a GP before taking one of our tests.
† The Migraine Trust

Categories Uncategorized

Pinpoint Your Food Sensitivities – Without Going to a Lab or Clinic

Using EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test results to guide your elimination diet can be an effective, simple way to pinpoint your food sensitivities – and you can do it every at home (instead of going to a lab or clinic for IgG testing).

If that’s something you’re interested in, simply go here now to study more about this at-home Food Sensitivity Test.

Using EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test results to guide your elimination diet can be an effective, simple way to pinpoint your food sensitivities.

Many people suffer from headaches, more or less frequently. There are more than 200 types of headaches; the most common ones are tension headache and migraine. The specific forms of headaches differ in frequency, duration and manifestation or in the type of pain (throbbing, hammering, pressing etc.).

What food allergies cause headaches

Migraine and tension headache are classified as so-called primary headaches; they are seen as a clinical picture of its own that can be treated directly.

The causes of primary headaches are still unclear. A large number of people affected by migraine suspect that foods could trigger the attacks. A delayed IgG food allergy might be such a trigger. The ImuPro concept may thus be a useful approach: It combines an IgG food allergy test and personalised nutritional guidelines. Study more.

Migraine is a complicated neurological picture. People affected generally suffer from long-lasting and intense headaches. Migraine headaches cause throbbing or pulsating pain, generally on only one side of the head.

They can interfere with sleep, work and other everyday activities and may happen as often as several times per week or as rarely as once or twice a year. A migraine most often begins at puberty and mostly affects those aged between 35 and 45 years.

The two common forms of migraine are called migraine without aura and with aura. The latter is a type of migraine that has warning signs before the pain begins, called an aura. Symptoms can include seeing flashing lights, blind spots, difficulty focusing on things, balance and co-ordination problems, weakness stiffness and tingling in the neck, shoulders or limbs as well as difficulty speaking.

The aura stage of the migraine often lasts from around 15 minutes to an hour. Around 1 in 5 people who experience migraines get aura symptoms.

What food allergies cause headaches

It is estimated that 1 in every 7 people around the globe suffer from migraines†, making it the third most common disease in the world.

Research has also revealed that migraines affect twice as numerous women as men and they affect adults and children of every ages.

The World Health Organisation classifies headache as a major health disorder and has rated migraine amongst the top 20 most disabling lifetime conditions. A migraine attack can final for between 4 and 72 hours and sufferers experience an average of 13 attacks each year.†

So what is the link between migraine and food intolerance and how could this link lead to answers and a resolution for your clients?

Known causes of a migraine include disturbed sleep patterns, stress, and reactions to certain foods and it is the latter that is regarded as one of the easiest to control.

There are numerous foods which may act as a trigger and could cause migraines.

The case for a food intolerance causing migraines

A survey of a 1,000 people suffering with migraine by the charity Migraine Action revealed that over two thirds of Migraine Action members affected by frequent migraine attacks believe that certain foods could be the cause.

The gold standard method for confirming food reactions is the elimination diet and challenge.

This involves eating a restricted diet over a period of time. If there is no improvement in the frequency or severity of your migraines during this time, it is assumed that the food type that has been restricted is not contributing to the symptoms (migraines), and the process is repeated with another food type.

This method can be extremely time consuming, and it is extremely hard to test every the diverse combinations of food types that may be contributing to the problem. A food intolerance* test can highlight a person’s trigger foods without the need for eliminating individual foods one by one and can form the basis of a fast-track elimination diet.

The potential that food intolerance* testing offers migraine sufferers has been demonstrated in several studies (see references below).

The most recent of these, published in the Headache Journal, concluded that the number and severity of migraine attacks was significantly reduced when the subject followed an IgG guided elimination diet.4

The Migraine Action survey 2011 meanwhile found that 85 percent of people affected by debilitating migraines had their symptoms reduced, and quality of life improved, once their food triggers were discovered and avoided.

Additional research from the University of York, the largest clinical trial of its helpful in migraine-like headaches, published in the Nutrition Journal, has further supported the Migraine Action findings.

It uncovered that the frequency of migraine attacks was slashed by almost a quarter (23%) over 4 weeks when the Lorisian food-specific antibodies test was carried out to identify a sufferer’s food triggers. For additional references please see below.

References

1. Further analysis of data published originally as Hardman G and Hart G (2007) Dietary advice based on food-specific IgG results. Nutrition and Food Science 37: 16-23.

2. Mitchell N et al (2011) Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine love headaches.

Nutrition Journal 10: 85.

3. Alpay K et al (2010) Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: a clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial. Cephalagia 30:829-37. Link.

4. Aydinlar E et al (2013) IgG-based elimination diet in migraine plus IBS. Headache 53:514-25. Link.

5. Rees T et al (2005) A prospective audit of food intolerance among migraine consumers in primary care clinical practice. Headache Care 2, 11-14. Link.

*Lorisian define food intolerance as a food-specific IgG antibody reaction.

Our information is intended to provide nutritional advice for dietary optimisation. Lorisian do not claim to treat or cure your client’s symptoms and recommend that they discuss any medical concerns they may own with a GP before taking one of our tests.
† The Migraine Trust

Categories Uncategorized

Symptoms

The sinus cavities are hollow air spaces with openings into the nose to permit the exchange of air and mucus. They are located inside each cheekbone, behind the eyes, behind the bridge of the nose and in the forehead.

Secretions from the sinus cavities normally drain into the nose.

Sinus headaches and pain happen when the sinuses are swollen and their openings into the nasal passages are obstructed, stopping normal drainage and causing pressure to build up.

Often the pain is localized over the affected sinus, perhaps causing facial pain rather than a headache. For example, if the maxillary sinus in the cheeks is obstructed, your cheeks may be tender to the touch and pain may radiate to your jaw and teeth. Obstruction in other sinuses can cause pain on the top of your head or elsewhere.

Sinus pain can be dull to intense; it often begins in the morning and becomes less intense after you move from lying flat to sitting or standing in an upright position.

Similar pain can also be caused by severe nasal congestion, particularly if you own a deviated septum or a septal “spur” from a previous nasal injury. Such “headaches” or facial pain can involve one side only.

Don’t let sinus headaches hold you back from the things you love.

Discover expert care with an allergist.

Management and Treatment

The first approach in managing sinus headaches is to avoid the allergens that trigger them.

Outdoor exposure:

  1. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  2. Stay indoors as much as possible when common triggers, such as high pollen counts, are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening, and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  3. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes, as this can cause your sinuses to flare up.

Indoor exposure:

  1. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom.

    Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs.

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home. Air conditioning units should be kept clean.
  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets:

  1. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold it out of your home as much as possible.

    If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not directly exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.

  2. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals. Wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free. Placing an air purifier in the bedroom may also help.

Many allergens that trigger sinus headaches are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them. The best way to manage your allergy headaches is to see an allergist. Another common cause of sinus headaches is allergic rhinitis (hay fever).

Both prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter or OTC) oral medications — antihistamines, decongestants and corticosteroids — are used to treat hay fever.

Another common cause of sinus headaches is allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Both prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter, or OTC) oral medications — antihistamines, decongestants and corticosteroids — are used to treat it.

  1. Oral and nasal decongestants. Found in numerous OTC and prescription medications, these may be the treatment of choice for the nasal congestion that causes a sinus headache.

    Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue.

  2. Antihistamines. These block the effects of histamine, a chemical produced by the body in response to allergens. Histamine is responsible for the symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including sneezing, itchy eyes and an itchy, runny nose. First-generation OTC antihistamines available in the United States can cause drowsiness, and regularly taking them can lead to a feeling of constant sluggishness, affecting learning, memory and performance. Newer antihistamines — such as Claritin (loratadine) and Zyrtec (cetirizine), both OTC, and Clarinex (desloratadine), Allegra (fexofenadine) and Xyzal (levocetirizine), available by prescription — are designed to minimize drowsiness while still blocking the effects of histamine.
  3. Intranasal corticosteroids.

    This is the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. These medications can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Other treatments and medications include:

  1. Nasal cromolyn. Nasal cromolyn is a nasal spray that blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances. Nasal cromolyn can assist to prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure. It does not work in every patients.
  2. Allergy shots (immunotherapy). Allergen immunotherapy, or allergy shots, may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications, experience side effects from medications, own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or desire a more permanent solution to their allergy problem.
  3. Pain relievers.

    Mild OTC pain relievers such as Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Advil (ibuprofen) may provide short-term relief for sinus headache pain.

At-home treatments

  1. Inhale steam two to four times per day (for example, while sitting in the bathroom with the shower running).
  2. Spray the nose with nasal saline several times per day.
  3. Drink plenty of fluids to thin the mucus.
  4. Apply a warm, moist washcloth to your face several times a day.
  5. Use a neti pot to flush the sinuses.

This sheet was reviewed for accuracy 4/17/2018.

If you feel ill after eating a red or yellow snow cone, after a Chinese restaurant meal, or following a glass of red wine, you're not imagining your symptoms.

While foods such as wheat, milk, soy, and peanuts are common sources of food allergies, it's also possible to be allergic to food additives such as food dyes, MSG, and sulfites.

While grand care is taken by the U.S. Food and Drug Association to ensure that every ingredients in foods sold in supermarkets are safe to eat for the majority of people, there are numerous people who remain sensitive to some of the additives. Food dye allergies are rare, being found in only about 4% of people with allergies, but they still can be the source of grand concern.


Additives That May Cause Reactions

Allergic reactions own been found to happen in some people after they consume three dyes in particular: carmine, FD&C Yellow #5 and annatto.

Carmine, also known as natural red 4, is actually derived from the scale of dried insects. While this seems strange, it has been used in food since the 16th century.

Red dye #4 is found in foods such as burgers and sausages, drinks and candy. Typically it is found in foods with shades of red, pink or purple. An allergy to carmine has been reported to result in both minor and significant reactions, including anaphylaxis.

FD&C Yellow #5, also known as tartrazine, is one of two yellow food dye allergies. The symptoms associated with this allergy include reports of hives and swelling. This dye is often found in candy, canned vegetables, cheese, ice cream, ketchup, and boiling dogs.

Annatto is the other yellow food dye that has been associated with allergies.

It comes from the seeds of the achiote tree and it is responsible for giving foods a yellow-orange color. Reports of several cases of anaphylactic reactions own been associated with this dye. Annatto can be found in cereals, cheeses, snack foods, and drinks.

It is significant for those with food dye allergies to realize that this allergy is not limited to just food and medications. Numerous personal care products, such as soaps and lotions, as well as cosmetics love eyeshadow, blush and nail polish, can also contain these same dyes. The same is true for household products as well, such as cleaning supplies, crayons, and shampoo.

Being familiar with how to read labels and what products to pay attention to are both extremely significant for those with food dye allergies.

Those who are having food dye reactions may experience mild or severe reactions. Among the most common symptoms, you will discover reactions such as headaches, itchy skin, swelling of the face or hives. Severe reactions are similar to those of other food allergy reactions such as difficulty breathing, dizziness, fainting, low blood pressure, and trouble breathing.

As in other allergic reactions, anaphylaxis can result, so immediate medical attention should be sought at the first sign of a reaction.


What is a Food Sensitivity?

The immune system is generally extremely effective at protecting your body against threats love germs and toxins. But if you own food sensitivities, your immune system mistakenly “thinks” that certain foods are dangerous to your body.

What food allergies cause headaches

It then reacts to the supposed threat by releasing IgG antibodies – and other substances – into the bloodstream. Ultimately, this immune response can result in any number of unpleasant symptoms, including migraines.

If you own food sensitivities, your immune system mistakenly “thinks” that certain foods are dangerous to your body and releases IgG antibodies into the bloodstream. This immune response can result in migraines.

It’s significant to hold in mind that a food sensitivity is not a food allergy!

Food allergies involve IgE antibodies (not IgG antibodies). Also, food allergies can be immediately life-threatening – which isn’t the case for food sensitivities. And food allergy symptoms appear almost as soon as you’ve eaten something you’re allergic to. But if you own a food sensitivity, you might not experience any symptoms for several days.


MSG and Sulfites: Potential Problems

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer and is often found to be an additive in numerous foods or used in cooking. When consumed in large amounts it can cause adverse effects on those who are sensitive to it.

Among the signs of a reaction, you might experience a feeling of warmth, flushing, headaches and chest pain. Fairly often MSG is found in Chinese cuisine, so those sensitive to this additive must request that it is excluded from the food preparation.

Another additive that may cause an allergic reaction is sulfites, which might happen naturally or be added to enhance crispness or to prevent it from spoiling. Sulfites are often used as a preservative in numerous foods and beverages. Sulfites can be found in such products as wine, beer, and dried fruits. For those with sulfite allergies or intolerances, consuming a sulfite-containing product in large amounts may lead to in-breathing.

This is of even greater concern for those with asthma, who already are predisposed to difficulty in breathing.

While food allergies are often diagnosed through blood tests, there are no tests available to diagnose a food dye, MSG or sulfite allergy. For this reason, one must hold a dependable diary of foods they eat and reactions that may result. This will then assist them to determine which food additive may be the cause of such a reaction.

Don't attempt to diagnose yourself; instead, talk to your doctor about your symptoms and about what testing she may recommend.


How an Elimination Diet + Food Sensitivity Testing Can Assist You Quickly Discover Migraine-Causing Foods

You can use an elimination diet to identify the foods that are potentially behind your migraines. How does this work?

Basically, in an elimination diet you start by removing foods you ponder might be responsible for your migraines – and you don’t eat any of those foods for about 2-4 weeks [3].

What food allergies cause headaches

Then, one at a time, you add each eliminated food back to your diet while watching for migraines over the next few days. If migraine symptoms pop up, you’ve possibly found a food that’s at fault.

An elimination diet done this way has some drawbacks. For example, because food sensitivity symptoms often take days to appear after you’ve eaten the “offending” food, it can be hard to make a excellent guess about what foods are actually responsible for your migraines. So you can wind up eliminating a lot of foods that actually aren’t causing any issues. As a result, it can take a endless time to finish the elimination diet.

There’s a shortcut, though: an at-home Food Sensitivity Test.

EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test reveals your IgG reactivity levels to 96 diverse kinds of food. The IgG reactivity levels are broken below into four diverse categories, ranging from Low to High reactivity.

EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test can cut below the quantity of time you need to carry out an elimination diet.

This information by itself, however, won’t tell you precisely what foods cause your migraines. That’s because high IgG reactivity levels don’t result in migraine symptoms 100% of the time. But there’s often a strong link between IgG reactivity to certain foods and migraines – as shown by the studies discussed above.

So this test can be an easy-but-powerful way to narrow below the number of foods you initially eliminate from your diet (before you add them back one by one).

It can thus be a huge time-saver – a dependable tool that, when paired with an elimination diet, can assist you quickly pinpoint migraine-causing foods.

(Learn more here: How To Use A Food Elimination Diet To Discover Your Food Sensitivities)

That’s what Kasey – from Kansas City – discovered after taking EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test:

“I know what foods to avoid and no longer own almost daily headaches.

This info has literally changed my life forever.”

It’s also what Caylin experienced:

“I own struggled with fatigue, joint pain, headaches/migraines, and skin issues for a while. I assumed it was an allergy to something, but the thought of eliminating every single food from my diet at a time to attempt to discover out exactly what it was seemed overwhelming to me – which just discouraged me from even trying…I tried to set up an appointment with the doctor, but after discovering the price it would cost, I decided to see if there was another way. I looked on the web and came across EverlyWell.

I was a little skeptical, but I decided to give it a attempt. When, the test came, I was so worried about messing up – and wasting money – but thankfully it was beautiful simple to do. The process was simple, and the free shipping was a plus. Everything seemed to work extremely efficiently and I was pleased. I waited in anticipation for the results – and found I own a food sensitivity to dairy. There are numerous other foods on the list, but dairy is on the top level.

So now, instead of just playing a guessing game with my foods, I own a better thought on what to eliminate, and it’s taken a huge weight off my shoulders.”

And here’s how Lexi – from Omaha, Nebraska – puts it:

“I get migraines occasionally and I know that one of my main triggers is stress, but I own always been suspicious of a food sensitivity. I didn’t own the time or patience to do an elimination diet and attempt to figure out on my own what I might be sensitive to, so I ordered the test.

Even if I had done an elimination diet without this test, I might still get migraines from other non-food related triggers, so I wouldn’t ever be certain if what I had eliminated was actually something I’m sensitive to. My results confirmed my suspicions and now I can confidently eliminate what I’m sensitive to without guessing if it’s going to work or not! I would definitely recommend doing the test if you’re wondering about food sensitivities.”


Food Sensitivity and Migraines

Several lines of research show that IgG reactivity to various foods is linked with migraines. In one study, researchers found that individuals who regularly experienced migraines were more likely to test positive for IgG reactivity to common foods [1].

In addition, people with migraines had IgG reactivity to a much greater number of foods compared to people in the control group (who didn’t experience migraines regularly).

Several lines of research show that IgG reactivity to various foods is linked with migraines.

Impressively, more than 75% of people in the migraine group no longer experienced regular migraines after doing a food elimination diet guided by the IgG test results.

In another study, researchers discovered that an IgG-based elimination diet – carried out over 6 weeks – effectively reduced the number of headache days and migraine attacks in a group of migraine patients [2].

Scientific studies aren’t the only source of evidence for a connection between food sensitivities and migraines. The personal experiences of numerous people also reveal such a link. For example, Rhonda – who ultimately decided to take EverlyWell’s Food Sensitivity Test – shared this tale with us:

“I suspected dairy products were a problem, but this test told me how bad a problem they were…Dairy products got me too wired to sleep and caused headaches and dizziness.”

A number of scientific studies – as well as personal experiences – thus propose a connection between IgG-based food sensitivities and migraines.

So how can you put that information to practical use if you suspect a food sensitivity is lurking behind your migraine attacks?

What food allergies cause headaches


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