What does an allergy sore throat feel like

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  2. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  3. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  4. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  5. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  6. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something. They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.



Cold, Flu, or Allergy?

Know the Difference for Best Treatment

You’re feeling beautiful lousy. You’ve got sniffles, sneezing, and a sore throat. Is it a freezing, flu, or allergies?

It can be hard to tell them apart because they share so numerous symptoms. But understanding the differences will assist you select the best treatment.

“If you know what you own, you won’t take medications that you don’t need, that aren’t effective, or that might even make your symptoms worse,” says NIH’s Dr. Teresa Hauguel, an expert on infectious diseases that affect breathing.

Cold, flu, and allergy every affect your respiratory systemThe body parts that assist you breathe, including your nose, throat, and lungs., which can make it hard to breathe.

Each condition has key symptoms that set them apart.

Colds and flu are caused by diverse viruses. “As a law of thumb, the symptoms associated with the flu are more severe,” says Hauguel. Both illnesses can lead to a runny, stuffy nose; congestion; cough; and sore throat. But the flu can also cause high fever that lasts for days, along with a headache, fatigue, and general aches and pain. These symptoms are less common when you own a cold.

“Allergies are a little diverse, because they aren’t caused by a virus,” Hauguel explains. “Instead, it’s your body’s immune systemProtects your body from invading germs and other microscopic threats.

What does an allergy sore throat feel like

reacting to a trigger, or allergen, which is something you’re allergic to.” If you own allergies and breathe in things love pollen or pet dander, the immune cells in your nose and airways may overreact to these harmless substances. Your delicate respiratory tissues may then swell, and your nose may become stuffed up or runny.

“Allergies can also cause itchy, watery eyes, which you don’t normally own with a freezing or flu,” Hauguel adds.

Allergy symptoms generally final as endless as you’re exposed to the allergen, which may be about 6 weeks during pollen seasons in the spring, summer, or drop.

Colds and flu rarely final beyond 2 weeks.

Most people with a freezing or flu recover on their own without medical care. But check with a health care provider if symptoms final beyond 10 days or if symptoms aren’t relieved by over-the-counter medicines. For more about when to see a doctor, go to CDC’s Flu Page.

To treat colds or flu, get plenty of relax and drink lots of fluids.

What does an allergy sore throat feel like

If you own the flu, pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen can reduce fever or aches. Allergies can be treated with antihistamines or decongestants. See the “Wise Choices” box for more details.

Be careful to avoid “drug overlap” when taking medicines that list 2 or more athletic ingredients on the label. For example, if you take 2 diverse drugs that contain acetaminophen—one for a stuffy nose and the other for headache—you may be getting too much acetaminophen.

“Read medicine labels carefully—the warnings, side effects, dosages. If you own questions, talk to your doctor or pharmacist, especially if you own children who are sick,” Hauguel says.

“You don’t desire to overmedicate, and you don’t desire to risk taking a medication that may interact with another.”

Symptoms Cold Flu Airborne Allergy
Fever Rare Usual, high ( °F), sometimes higher, especially in young children); lasts days Never
Headache Uncommon Common Uncommon
General Aches, Pains Slight Usual; often severe Never
Fatigue, Weakness Sometimes Usual, can final up to 3 weeks Sometimes
Extreme Exhaustion Never Usual, at the beginning of the illness Never
Stuffy, Runny Nose Common Sometimes Common
Sneezing Usual Sometimes Usual
Sore Throat Common Sometimes Sometimes
Cough Common Common, can become severe Sometimes
Chest Discomfort Mild to moderate Common Rare, except for those with allergic asthma
Treatment Get plenty of rest.
Stay hydrated.

(Drink plenty of fluids.)
Decongestants.
Aspirin (ages 18 and up), acetaminophen, or ibuprofen for aches and pains

Get plenty of rest.
Stay hydrated.
Aspirin (ages 18 and up), acetaminophen, or ibuprofen for aches, pains, and fever
Antiviral medicines (see your doctor)
Avoid allergens (things that you’re allergic to)
Antihistamines
Nasal steroids
Decongestants
Prevention Wash your hands often.
Avoid shut contact with anyone who has a cold.
Get the flu vaccine each year.
Wash your hands often.
Avoid shut contact with anyone who has the flu.
Avoid allergens, such as pollen, home dust mites, mold, pet dander, cockroaches.
Complications Sinus infection middle ear infection, asthma Bronchitis, pneumonia; can be life-threatening Sinus infection, middle ear infection, asthma

You own an allergy when your body overreacts to things that dont cause problems for most people.

These things are called allergens. If you own allergies, your body releases chemicals when you are exposed to an allergen. One type of chemical that your body releases is called histamine. Histamine is your bodys defense against the allergen. The release of histamine causes your symptoms.

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen. Pollen comes from flowering trees, grass, and weeds. If you are allergic to pollen, you will notice your symptoms are worse on boiling, dry days when wind carries the pollen. On rainy days, pollen often is washed to the ground, which means you are less likely to breathe it.

  1. Allergies that happen in the spring (late April and May) are often due to tree pollen.
  2. Allergies that happen in the summer (late May to mid-July) are often due to grass and weed pollen.
  3. Allergies that happen in the drop (late August to the first frost) are often due to ragweed.

Allergens that can cause perennial allergic rhinitis include:

  1. Mold. Mold is common where water tends to collect, such as shower curtains and damp basements.

    It can also be found in rotting logs, hay, and mulch. This allergy is generally worse during humid and rainy weather.

  2. Animal dander.Proteins found in the skin, saliva, and urine of furry pets such as cats and dogs are allergens. You can be exposed to dander when handling an animal or from home dust that contains dander.
  3. Dust. Numerous allergens, including dust mites, are in dust. Dust mites are tiny living creatures found in bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and upholstered furniture.

    They live on dead skin cells and other things found in home dust.

If you’re plagued by seasonal allergies, you know the usual drill for this time of year: a runny nose, watery eyes, itchiness, and a general sense of distress. Oh, and maybe a sore throat.

Yup, that’s another unpleasantry spring sniffle sufferers often own to face. Though not everyone associates an itchy, scratchy throat with seasonal allergies, this symptom is completely normal, says Omid Mehdizadeh, MD, an otolaryngologist and laryngologist at Providence St.

John’s Health Middle in Santa Monica, California.

That doesn’t make it enjoyment, though. Here’s a glance at why allergies sometimes cause a sore throat—and what you can do to start feeling better.


Why allergies can cause a sore throat

First, let’s talk allergies If you’re allergic to something, your body sees proteins in that substance as a foreign invader. And when those proteins get into your system—say, by breathing in a whiff of dust or getting pollen blown into your eyes—your immune system launches an inflammatory response in an attempt to protect you.

Part of that inflammatory response involves producing lots of additional mucus.

The mucus helps propel the debris out of your body, but it can give you a runny nose and congestion. And that’s not every. “The ears, nose, and throat are every physically connected, so problems in one area can affect another,” says William Reisacher, MD, director of allergy services at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medicine in New York.

As a result, that mucus can cause postnasal drip, where the gooky stuff dribbles below the back of your throat and makes it feel raw and irritated.

Allergens can also trigger the tissues in the back of your throat to become inflamed, which only adds to the discomfort, says Dr. Mehdizadeh.


How to tell the difference between a freezing and allergies

Both allergies and infections can cause symptoms love sore throat, runny nose, and congestion. So how can you tell what’s actually making you feel crummy?

How your symptoms start are often one large clue: Colds tend to creep up slowly, while allergy symptoms generally flare up shortly after you’re exposed to an allergen, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

If you start to notice itching, stuffiness, or an annoying tickle in the back of your throat after spending some time exterior, for instance, you’re probably dealing with allergies.

Other clues to watch for: If your sore throat tends to get worse or makes it hard to swallow, or you develop a fever, chills, or body aches, you’re probably dealing with a freezing or infection, Dr. Mehdizadeh says.

What does an allergy sore throat feel like

If your allergy medications don’t seem to be helping, that’s also a sign it’s probably a freezing.

The bad news?

What does an allergy sore throat feel like

“Colds and allergies can exist at the same time,” Dr. Reisacher says. So if you can’t figure out what you’re dealing with, talk with your doctor.

What does an allergy sore throat feel like


What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Anaphylaxis?

Allergic reactions can cause:

  1. wheezing
  2. throat tightness or feeling love the throat or airways are closing
  3. a feeling love something bad is about to happen
  4. hives
  5. nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, or diarrhea
  6. trouble swallowing
  7. pale skin
  8. trouble breathing
  9. nasal stuffiness or coughing
  10. skin itching, tingling, redness, or swelling
  11. hoarseness or trouble speaking
  12. fast heartbeat or pulse
  13. passing out

Anaphylaxis can cause diverse symptoms at diverse times.

It’s considered anaphylaxis if someone has:

  1. any severe symptoms, such as trouble breathing, repeated vomiting, passing out, or throat tightness
    or
  2. two or more mild symptoms, such as hives and vomiting or coughing and stomach pain

The person needs treatment correct away.

How to treat a sore throat caused by allergies

Allergy meds are generally the best put to start. Anti-histamines, love Claritin, Zyrtec, or Benadryl, can assist tame inflammation and ease your symptoms overall, Dr. Mehdizadeh says. Nasal sprays, love ipratropium, and nasal glucocorticoids, love fluticasone, are excellent for easing postnasal drip, too.

Natural remedies could also make a difference. Gargling with warm saltwater can assist get rid of irritating mucus, and drinking plenty of water or inhaling steam may soothe scratchiness.

Of course, prevention might be the most effective tactic of every. Minimizing your exposure to allergens can hold your symptoms from flaring up in the first place—and assist stop that sore throat before it starts.

Marygrace TaylorMarygrace Taylor is a health and wellness author for Prevention, Parade, Women’s Health, Redbook, and others.

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What Is Anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction.

Things that can cause allergic reactions are called allergens.

Anaphylaxis (pronounced: an-eh-fil-AK-siss) most often happens during allergic reactions to:

  1. foods
  2. insect stings
  3. medicines
  4. latex

Anaphylaxis can be scary. But being prepared will assist you treat a reaction quickly.

What to Do if You Own Anaphylaxis

Give yourself epinephrine correct away if you start to:

  1. feel tightness in your throat
  2. have trouble breathing
  3. Lay below with your legs raised while you wait for the ambulance.
  4. Use the epinephrine auto-injector correct away. Then call
  5. feel faint
  6. have two or more milder allergic symptoms together (like hives with coughing)
  7. Go to the emergency room, even if symptoms improve after epinephrine.

    You must be under medical supervision for several hours. This is because a second wave of serious symptoms (called a biphasic reaction) often happens. You can get more treatment at the emergency room, if you need it.

Don’t attempt to use an inhaler or antihistamine and wait to see what happens. Go straight for the epinephrine! Seconds count during anaphylaxis.

If you own signs of a serious allergic reaction:

  • Lay below with your legs raised while you wait for the ambulance.
  • Use the epinephrine auto-injector correct away. Then call
  • Avoid the things you are allergic to.
  • Carry two epinephrine auto injectors with you at every times.

    Epinephrine can be a lifesaver.

  • Go to the emergency room, even if symptoms improve after epinephrine. You must be under medical supervision for several hours. This is because a second wave of serious symptoms (called a biphasic reaction) often happens. You can get more treatment at the emergency room, if you need it.
  • Let friends, teachers, and coaches know about your allergies and how they can assist you if you own a reaction.

How Is Anaphylaxis Treated?

Someone with anaphylaxis needs assist correct away.

The reaction can get worse extremely quickly. So doctors generally desire people with allergies to carry injectable medicine called epinephrine. Epinephrine enters the bloodstream and works quickly against serious allergy symptoms.

Doctors prescribe auto injectors. These should always be with the person with allergies, including at school, sports, jobs, and other activities. The auto injector is little and simple to use.

If you’re prescribed epinephrine, the doctor will show you how to use it.

What does an allergy sore throat feel like

Always own two auto injectors with you in case one doesn’t work or you need a second dose.

Your doctor also might instruct you to take antihistamines in some cases. But always treat a serious reaction with epinephrine. Never use antihistamines instead of epinephrine in serious reactions.

What Else Should I Know?

Being prepared can assist you stay safe:

  1. Carry two epinephrine auto injectors with you at every times.

    Epinephrine can be a lifesaver.

  2. Avoid the things you are allergic to.
  3. Let friends, teachers, and coaches know about your allergies and how they can assist you if you own a reaction.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction usually develop within a few minutes of being exposed to something you’re allergic to, although occasionally they can develop gradually over a few hours.

Although allergic reactions can be a nuisance and hamper your normal activities, most are mild.

Very occasionally, a severe reaction called anaphylaxis can occur.

How Is Anaphylaxis Treated?

Someone with anaphylaxis needs assist correct away.

The reaction can get worse extremely quickly. So doctors generally desire people with allergies to carry injectable medicine called epinephrine. Epinephrine enters the bloodstream and works quickly against serious allergy symptoms.

Doctors prescribe auto injectors. These should always be with the person with allergies, including at school, sports, jobs, and other activities. The auto injector is little and simple to use.

If you’re prescribed epinephrine, the doctor will show you how to use it. Always own two auto injectors with you in case one doesn’t work or you need a second dose.

Your doctor also might instruct you to take antihistamines in some cases.

But always treat a serious reaction with epinephrine. Never use antihistamines instead of epinephrine in serious reactions.

What Else Should I Know?

Being prepared can assist you stay safe:

  1. Carry two epinephrine auto injectors with you at every times. Epinephrine can be a lifesaver.
  2. Avoid the things you are allergic to.
  3. Let friends, teachers, and coaches know about your allergies and how they can assist you if you own a reaction.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction usually develop within a few minutes of being exposed to something you’re allergic to, although occasionally they can develop gradually over a few hours.

Although allergic reactions can be a nuisance and hamper your normal activities, most are mild.

Very occasionally, a severe reaction called anaphylaxis can occur.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November
Next review due: 22 November


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