What do allergy injections do

What do allergy injections do

Immunotherapy may be an option for a little number of people with certain severe and persistent allergies who are unable to control their symptoms using the measures above.

The treatment involves being given occasional little doses of the allergen, either as an injection, or as drops or tablets under the tongue, over the course of several years.

The injection can only be performed in a specialist clinic under the supervision of a doctor, as there’s a little risk of a severe reaction.

The drops or tablets can generally be taken at home.

The purpose of treatment is to help your body get used to the allergen so it does not react to it so severely.

This will not necessarily cure your allergy, but it’ll make it milder and mean you can take less medicine.


Treating specific allergic conditions

Use the links under to discover information about how specific allergies and related conditions are treated:

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

What is immunotherapy?

Immunotherapy, also known as allergy shots, are aimed at retraining your immune system so your allergic reactions become less severe.

Prior to starting immunotherapy, a doctor will identify allergens a patient is allergic to by conducting a skin prick or intradermal test.

What do allergy injections do

Immunotherapy works by gradually injecting doses of allergens in the form of a shot, which leads to the immune system becoming less sensitive to the substance. With time, individuals who get immunotherapy will experience less allergy symptoms.


How effective are allergy shots?

Immunotherapy is a extremely effective way to manage allergies.

What do allergy injections do

It is significant to consult with your allergist to see if immunotherapy is correct for you.


Allergy medicines

Medicines for mild allergies are available from pharmacies without a prescription.

But always enquire a pharmacist or GP for advice before starting any new medicine, as they’re not suitable for everyone.

Decongestants

Decongestants can be used as a short-term treatment for a blocked nose caused by an allergic reaction.

They can be taken as tablets, capsules, nasal sprays or liquids.

Do not use them for more than a week at a time, as using them for endless periods can make your symptoms worse.

Lotions and creams

Red and itchy skin caused by an allergic reaction can sometimes be treated with over-the-counter creams and lotions, such as:

  1. calamine lotion to reduce itchiness
  2. moisturising creams (emollients) to hold the skin moist and protect it from allergens
  3. steroids to reduce inflammation

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are the main medicines for allergies.

What do allergy injections do

They can be used:

  1. as and when you notice the symptoms of an allergic reaction
  2. to prevent allergic reactions – for example, you may take them in the morning if you own hay fever and you know the pollen count is high that day

Antihistamines can be taken as tablets, capsules, creams, liquids, eye drops or nasal sprays, depending on which part of your body is affected by your allergy.

Steroids

Steroid medicines can assist reduce inflammation caused by an allergic reaction.

They’re available as:

Sprays, drops and feeble steroid creams are available without a prescription.

What do allergy injections do

Stronger creams, inhalers and tablets are available on prescription from a GP.


Treating severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis)

Some people with severe allergies may experience life-threatening reactions, known as anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock.

If you’re at risk of this, you’ll be given special injectors containing a medicine called adrenaline to use in an emergency.

If you develop symptoms of anaphylaxis, such as difficulty breathing, you should inject yourself in the outer thigh before seeking emergency medical assist.

Find out more about treating anaphylaxis


Avoiding exposure to allergens

The best way to hold your symptoms under control is often to avoid the things you’re allergic to, although this is not always practical.

For example, you may be capable to help manage:

  1. mould allergies by keeping your home dry and well-ventilated, and dealing with any damp and condensation
  2. animal allergies by keeping pets exterior as much as possible and washing them regularly
  3. food allergies by being careful about what you eat
  4. hay fever by staying indoors and avoiding grassy areas when the pollen count is high
  5. dust mite allergies by using allergy-proof duvets and pillows, and fitting wooden floors rather than carpets


How often do I own to get allergy shots?

Initially patients get allergy shots once or twice a week .

During this phase individuals get injections that slowly contain more allergens. Once an effective dose is reached there will be longer periods of time between shots. The time span between shots often ranges from person-to-person.

Learn more about allergy shots.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop. Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science.

What do allergy injections do

«Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition. More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

What do allergy injections do

In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN). Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses.

According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states. Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S.

What do allergy injections do

[Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]


RELATED VIDEO: