What causes yeast allergies in dogs

Thyme contains flavanoids, which own antioxidant, anti-inflammatory properties. It also has antiseptic and antifungal properties, which make it grand for use where skin and yeast infections are common, love between your dog’s toes.

If you’ve noticed your dog chewing at their paws, attempt making an infusion out of dry or unused thyme and apply it to the affected areas. Make certain it gets deep between the toes, too.


Bromelain & Papain

Bromelain and Papain are proteolytic enzymes, which is a fancy way of saying they break below protein. Bromelain comes from pineapples, and papain comes from papayas.

They assist increase the absorbtion of quercetin, which is why they are often sold together.

Bromelain and Papain also reduce pain and inflammation in mucous membranes and other parts of the body.

They should be used with quercetin for the best results.

You can purchase Bromelain and Papain here.


Oat Baths

Do NOT use oat if your dog is itching due to a yeast infection. Oat is a source of carbohydrates, which will only make yeast thrive.

However, if your pup’s itching is caused by allergies, an oat bath can be extremely soothing. Boil oat straw in water and stir it in with your dog’s bath.

This will reduce itching, and the bath itself will be helpful in removing numerous of the allergens that can be present on your dog’s skin or trapped in their coat.

You can purchase organic oat straw here.


Aloe Vera

When you use aloe vera for your dog, make certain you are not using the whole leaf.

The leaf contains saponins, the yellow or orange substance found in the rind, which is a laxative that can make your dog ill. Use only the gel.

If you are buying aloe gel from a store instead of getting it from the plant directly, it should be fine.

Aloe has antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties that make it perfect for treating burns, itches, and boiling spots when applied to the skin. If your dog is itching, apply the gel to the affected areas.

The cooling effect often reduces the discomfort immediately. It should be applied twice a day.

You can purchase aloe vera gel here.



One of the most common medical complaints that we see in our office is dogs with skin infections, “hot spots”, or allergic dermatitis, also known as atopic (atopy) dermatitis.

Unlike people who react to allergens most commonly with nasal symptoms and/or hives, dogs react with skin and/or gastrointestinal problems.

This is because there are a higher proportion of mast cells, which release histamines and other vasoactive substances in the face of an allergic challenge, in the skin of dogs. These problems may range from poor jacket texture or hair length, to itching and chewing, to boiling spots and self-mutilation, gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, diarrhea, and flatulence. Allergies may also frolic a part in chronic ear infections. The most common causes of canine allergic dermatitis are flea allergy, food allergy, inhalant or contact allergy, and allergy to the normal bacterial flora and yeast organisms of the skin.

To make matters more hard to diagnose and treat, thyroid disease may add to the problem as well.

Canine atopic dermatitis (allergic dermatitis, canine atopy) is an inherited predisposition to develop allergic symptoms following repeated exposure to some otherwise harmless substance, an “allergen”. Most dogs start to show their allergic signs between 1 and 3 years of age. Due to the hereditary nature of the disease, several breeds, including Golden Retrievers, most terriers, Irish Setters, Lhasa Apsos, Dalmatians, Bulldogs, and Ancient English Sheep dogs are more commonly atopic, but numerous dogs, including mixed breed dogs can own atopic dermatitis.

Atopic animals will generally rub, lick, chew, bite, or scratch at their feet, flanks, ears, armpits, or groin, causing patchy or inconsistent hair loss and reddening and thickening of the skin. The skin itself may be dry and crusty or oily depending upon the dog. Dogs may also rub their face on the carpet; ear flaps may become red and boiling. Because the wax-producing glands of the ear overproduce as a response to the allergy, they get bacterial and yeast (Malassezia ) infections of the ear.

In order to overcome these frustrating symptoms, your veterinarian’s approach needs to be thorough and systematic.

Shortcuts generally will not produce results and only add to owner frustration and canine discomfort.

Inhalant and Contact Allergies
Substances that can cause an allergic reaction in dogs are much the same as those that cause reactions in people including the pollens of grasses, trees and weeds, dust mites, and molds. A clue to diagnosing these allergies is to glance at the timing of the reaction. Does it happen year round? This may be mold or dust. If the reaction is seasonal, pollens may be the culprit.

Food Allergies
Numerous people don’t suspect food allergies as the cause of their dog’s itching because their pet has been fed the same food every its life and has just recently started having symptoms.

However, animals can develop allergies to a substance over time, so this fact does not law out food allergies. Another common misconception is that dogs are only sensitive to poor quality food. If the dog is allergic to an ingredient, it doesn’t matter whether it is in premium food or the most inexpensive brand on the market. One advantage to premium foods is that some avoid common fillers that are often implicated in allergic reactions.

Flea Allergies
This type of reaction generally is not to the flea itself, but rather to proteins in its saliva. Interestingly enough, the dogs most prone to this problem are not dogs who are constantly flea ridden, but those who are exposed only occasionally!

A single bite can cause a reaction for five to seven days, so you don’t need a lot of fleas to own a miserable dog.

Staphylococcus Hypersensitivity
Bacterial hypersensitivity occurs when a dog’s immune system overreacts to the normal Staphylococcus (Staph) bacteria on its skin. It appears that bacterial hypersensitivity in the dog is more likely to happen if other conditions such as hypothyroidism, inhalant allergy, and/or flea allergy are concurrently present. Bacterial hypersensitivity is diagnosed through bacterial culture and examination of a biopsy sample.

Microscopically, there are certain unique changes in the blood vessels of the skin in bacterial hypersensitivity.


Does your pet own allergies?

Allergies are perhaps one of the most hard problems to effectively diagnose and treat. Allergies are often explored when every other potential causes – such as respiratory infection, virus, or parasites are eliminated.

Rubbing the face on carpet

  • Treatment

    Medicated Baths
    Numerous medicated shampoos own compounds in them that are aimed at soothing injured skin and calming inflammation.

    In addition, frequent bathing (weekly to every other week) of the dog can remove allergens from the hair jacket, which may contribute to skin allergy flare-ups. The medicated baths we recommend are those that actually contain antimicrobial and antifungal agents as well as ingredients that permit the skin to be bathed on a more frequent basis without drying it out. Application of a rinse afterwards also helps to prevent drying out of the skin and hair coat.

    Antihistamines
    Antihistamines can be used with excellent safety in dogs. About one third of owners report success with antihistamines. These medications tend to own a variable effect between dogs.

    For some allergic dogs, antihistamines work extremely well in controlling symptoms of allergic skin disease. For other dogs, extremely little effect is seen. Therefore, a minimum of three diverse types of antihistamines should be tried before owners give up on this therapy. Examples of antihistamines commonly used for dogs include Benadryl, Chlortrimeton, Atarax, Claritin, Zyrtec, and Clemastine. However, antihistamines are considered to be worth trying in most cases since the side effects associated with antihistamines is low, and they are typically inexpensive medications.

    Antibiotics and Antifungal Medications
    Antibiotics are frequently needed to treat secondary skin infections.

    Anti-fungal medications are frequently needed to treat secondary yeast infections.

    Flea Control
    For dogs with this problem, a strict flea control regime must be maintained. The best flea control options include the use of products such as Advantage, Revolution, Frontline, Comfortis, and Sentinel.

    Supplements
    The Omega-3 and Omega-6 essential fatty acid supplements work by improving the overall health of the skin. These fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agents. They reportedly are helpful in 20% of allergic dogs.

    My own experience puts this figure a little higher. They are certainly worth a attempt because they are not harmful and own virtually no side effects. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish oils and omega-6 fatty acids are derived from plants containing gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). These supplements are diverse from those sold to produce a glossy jacket. Products that contain both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids include Allergen Caps and Halo.

    Hypoallergenic Diets
    Allergies develop through exposure, so most hypoallergenic diets incorporate proteins and carbohydrates that your dog has never had before.

    As mentioned previously, the quickest and best way to determine which foods your dog may or may not be allergic to is through diagnostic allergy testing. As dairy, beef, and wheat are responsible for 80% of food allergies in dogs, these items should be avoided. Novel protein sources used in hypoallergenic diets include venison, egg, duck, kangaroo, and types of fish not generally found in pet food. Carbohydrate sources include potatoes, peas, yams, sweet potatoes, and canned pumpkin.

    Hydrolyzed protein diets are diets in which the protein source has been synthetically reduced to little fragments. The theory behind feeding a hydrolyzed protein source is that the proteins in the food should be little enough that the allergic dog’s immune system will not recognize the protein fragments and will not mount an immune response resulting in an allergy.

    Most pets with food allergies reply well when switched to a store-bought hypoallergenic diet, but occasionally an animal suffers from such extreme allergies that a homemade diet is the only option.

    In this case, the diet should be customized with the aid of a veterinarian.

    Corticosteroids and Immunosuppressive Agents
    Cortisone products such as prednisone, prednisolone, and dexamethasone reduce itching by reducing inflammation. These medications are not without side effects, so they need to be used judiciously in treating skin allergies. Steroids should be considered only when the allergy season is short, the quantity of drug required is little, or to relieve a dog in extreme discomfort. Side effects can include increased thirst and appetite, increased need to urinate, and behavioral changes. Long-term use can result in diabetes and decreased resistance to infection.

    In some dogs, endless term, low-dose alternate day therapy is the only management protocol that successfully controls the atopic pet. This protocol should be used only as a final resort after every other methods own been exhausted to avoid the potential long-term complications of the medication.

    Cyclosporine (Atopica) is a medication, which seems to be fairly effective at reducing the inflammation associated with skin allergies and calming the immune system of the affected dog. However, the pricing of cyclosporine may be prohibitive for larger breed dogs.

    Immunotherapy (Hypo-sensitization)
    Allergy shots are extremely safe, and numerous people own grand success with them; however, they are extremely slow to work.

    It may be six to twelve months before improvement is seen.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    Once the allergens for the dog are identified, an appropriate immunotherapy is manufactured for that specific dog, and treatment can start. After the offending antigens are identified, then a mixture of these antigens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection. Depending on the type of agents used, these injections will be given over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the agents. After initial protection, an occasional booster may own to be given.

    Environmental Control
    If you know which substances your dog is allergic to, avoidance is the best method of control.

    Even if you are desensitizing the dog with allergy shots, it is best to avoid the allergen altogether. Molds can be reduced by using a dehumidifier or placing activated charcoal on top of the exposed dirt in your home plants. Dusts and pollens are best controlled by using an air cleaner with a HEPA filter. Air conditioning can also reduce circulating amounts of airborne allergens because windows are then kept closed.

    Thyroid Medication
    Healthy skin and a normal hair jacket are the results of numerous factors, both external and internal. There are several glands in the body responsible for the production of hormones that are vital for the regulation of other body functions as well as a normal skin surface and hair jacket.

    Hypothyroidism may result in poor skin and hair jacket, including hair loss or abnormal hair turnover, dull or brittle hair, altered pigmentation, and oily or dry skin. A blood test is a simplest and most direct way to tell if your dog is hypothyroid. Thyroid testing may include every or part of the following:

    Baseline T4 Test or Entire T4 (TT4): This is the most common test. Dogs with a failure of the thyroid gland will own a lowered level of the T4 hormone. However, there are other conditions that can cause the T4 to decrease, so if this test comes back positive for hypothyroidism your vet should recommend an additional blood test, either the T3 Test or the Baseline TSH test.

    Baseline TSH Test: Measures the level of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone.

    In combination with the T4 or T3 test, it provides a more finish picture of the hormonal activity of your dog’s thyroid gland.

    Free T4 by RIA (radio immunoassay): The Free T4 test using RIA techniques does not appear to be more or less precise than the above TT4 test.

    Free T4 by ED (equilibrium dialysis): This test may provide more precise data on the level of T4 hormone in your dog’s bloodstream.

    Baseline T3 Test: In combination with the T4 or TSH test, these two blood tests can give a clearer picture of the hormone levels found in the bloodstream.

    This test is not dependable when used alone. The T3 Test should always be given in combination with one of the other blood tests.

    TSH Response Test: In this test, the veterinarian takes an initial measurement of the thyroid hormones in your dog’s bloodstream and then injects Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) into the vein. After 6 hours, a blood sample is drawn and the level of T4 is checked. If your dog has hypothyroidism, the level of T4 will not increase even after the TSH is injected.

    This is an expensive test and is being used less often due to decreased production by the manufacturers.

    Hypothyroidism is treated with a daily dose of synthetic thyroid hormone called thyroxine (levothyroxine). Blood samples will need to be drawn periodically to assess the effectiveness of the dosage and make any adjustments necessary.

    Successful management of the atopic, allergic dog is sometimes complicated and frustrating because multi-modal management is necessary in the majority of cases to control the allergic flare-ups. Proper diagnosis by a veterinarian and owner compliance and follow up care is essential to maximize the chances of curing or at least controlling the severely affected allergy patient.



    Does your dog own itchy skin?

    Recurrent boiling spots or gunky ears? Does she lick and chew at her feet?

    This doesn’t necessarily mean she has allergies, it coulda yeast infection.

    Fighting Yeast On The Surface

    Apple cider vinegar is a great solution for yeast, especially for dogs who love the water (because yeast loves water and moist, damp skin).

    Fill a squeeze bottle (the helpful with a endless pointy finish love ketchup bottles at a diner)with Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar.Stick it in your dog’s fur and squeeze. Massage it around your dog’s body, and don’t forget the stomach area too.This will assist restore your dog’s healthy pH levels and discourage yeast.

    Then, once a week, or more if needed, massage yeasty areas with this coconut oil mixture:

    1. Add 10 drops of lavender oil and 2 drops of lemon essential oil.

    2. Let additional virgin coconut oil melt in a little glass bottle holding about 8 oz.
    3. Shake to stir and massage it into your dog’s skin.

    This coconut oil stir will final several months. Store it in a dark place.This recipe is fromRita Hogan of Farm Dog Naturals (FarmDogNaturals.com).


  • Dermal Effects – Dermal symptoms include itching involving the skin. This itching can be localized to a specific spot or can affect the pet’s entire body. Welts, bumps, redness, rashes, and hair loss are common manifestations of allergies.

    This is by far the most common form of allergy symptom. Ear infections are another common dermal symptom of allergies.

  • Yeast: The Allergy Imitator

    Not allskin issues arecaused by allergies and in numerous cases,the cause of your dog’s itchy skin can be found in hergut.

    Yeast is a fungus and is in every dogs (and people) as a normal part of their flora. Yeast lives on your dog’s skin and inside her gut, where it normally lives with other healthy flora, as part of the balanced immune system.

    But when the immune system is stressed, yeast can beginto over-populate the gut.

    Your dog’s skin is the largest organ in her body … and when yeast populations grow out of control in the gut, the body tries to getrid of thefungus.

    This is when you will start to see the effects in your pet.

    It’scalled a yeast infection.

    [Note] Grab our Leaky Gut Guideand getthe tools you need to start healing your dog from the inside out.

    Skin lesions or abrasions due to self-mutilation from constant scratching

  • Symptoms include:

  • Chewing on feet

  • Prebiotics

    Adding a prebiotic will make your probiotics more effective.

    Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients that feed the probiotics in the gut. You can purchase prebiotic supplements love inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides. As with every human supplements, assume the dose is for a 150 lb person and adjust for your dog’s weight.

    Another excellent source of prebiotics is larch arabinogalactan. Arabinogalactans are prebiotics that are contained in little amounts in foods love carrots, pears, corn, and coconut, as well as herbs love echinacea, astragalus and shiitake mushrooms.

    But the most highly concentrated source of arabinogalactan is from the Western Larch tree. There are numerous brands of larch arabinogalactan available and you can add about half a teaspoon daily to meals for a medium sized dog. For maximum benefits, give larch that’s combined with a excellent probiotic containing 10 billion CFU (colony forming units), love this one.

    You can also use whole food sources of prebiotics. A couple of excellent ones for dogs are:

    1. Second, avoid toxins that will stress the immune system. This includes any unnecessary vaccines, drugs and chemicals, including pesticides contained in flea and tick preventatives. These every interfere with your dog’s ability to hold her intestinal flora in balance.Focus on building excellent health and supporting your dog’s immune system.
    2. Probiotic Supplements

      There are numerous probiotic supplements available for both dogs and humans and the choices can be overwhelming.

      A excellent law is to glance for arefrigerated product. Enquire your specialty pet store or health food store for advice on a qualitybrand.

      Dosage: If you purchase a product made for dogs, follow the dosing directions on the container. You can also purchase a human probiotic supplement. If you do, assume the directions are for a 150 pound human and adjust the doseto your dog’s weight.

      Most probiotics are dairy based but soil based probiotics can be a better choice as dairy-based probiotics can aggravate allergies in numerous dogs.

      Supporting The Gut

      There are other things you can do to assist prevent or treat yeast infections in your dog, and once again, these involve the gut.

    3. First, limit antibiotic use.Antibiotics will destroy the balance in the gut and permit yeast to bloom.
    4. Raw dandelion greens: sprinkle on food 1 teaspoon of dried greens per 20 lbs of body weight per day.
    5. Itching and scratching every over the body

    6. Third, give your dog probiotics and prebiotics to support the balance ofher intestinal flora.
    7. Garlic: feed 1 teaspoon of chopped raw garlic per 30 lbs of your dog’s weight per day.
    8. Fourth, treat leaky gut.Yeast can be extremely damaging to the gut lining, leading to gut syndrome that affects overall health in numerous ways.

      Read more about leaky gut below.

    Respiratory Effects – Respiratory symptoms can include runny nose, discharge from the eyes, wheezing, coughing, and even constriction of the airway.

  • Itching and scratching every over the body

  • Probiotic Supplements

    There are numerous probiotic supplements available for both dogs and humans and the choices can be overwhelming. A excellent law is to glance for arefrigerated product. Enquire your specialty pet store or health food store for advice on a qualitybrand.

    Dosage: If you purchase a product made for dogs, follow the dosing directions on the container.

    You can also purchase a human probiotic supplement. If you do, assume the directions are for a 150 pound human and adjust the doseto your dog’s weight.

    Most probiotics are dairy based but soil based probiotics can be a better choice as dairy-based probiotics can aggravate allergies in numerous dogs.

    Supporting The Gut

    There are other things you can do to assist prevent or treat yeast infections in your dog, and once again, these involve the gut.

    • Dairy products
    • Rawhides (may contain beef or pork)
    • Fourth, treat leaky gut.Yeast can be extremely damaging to the gut lining, leading to gut syndrome that affects overall health in numerous ways.

      Read more about leaky gut below.

    • Pollen
    • Trees
    • Third, give your dog probiotics and prebiotics to support the balance ofher intestinal flora.
    • If other pets eat a diverse food, feed them in an entirely diverse room, so there is no chance the pet with allergies can own access to the other food
    • ANY ‘people’ food
    • Inhalation
    • Dust mites
    • If you desire to give a treat, use the limited ingredient food, or the same food’s canned version – the canned food can also be used to give a pill or to stir medication with
    • Topical exposure
    • How To Tell The Difference Between Yeast Infections And Allergies

      There are a few telltale signs that will assist you figure out what’s causing your dog’s problems:

      Chewing or licking the feet, and dark rusty-red hair between the toes.

      The hair is often red or rust-colored because of the yeast (not because of the licking).

      Any black skin, especially where there’s alsohair loss.

      A foul, funky smell and greasy hair (seborrhea), often accompanied by heavy dandruff. This is an athletic fungal infection of the hair follicles.

      Scratching the ears, or head shaking.

      Ear mites can also cause intense itching in the ears, so make certain your vet actuallytests for these things first before diagnosing your dog.

      Cyclic symptoms (appearing in the spring and “going away” in the fall). This is often confused with “grass allergies” and other spring and summer symptoms.

      Hair loss on the tail and upper back.

      Speckles (like tiny black dots) on the underbelly, or grayish or rust coloration around the genitals. Regular grooming should reveal this early indicator of yeast.

      The longer your dog’s yeast infection goes untreated, the harder it will be to resolve, so it’s significant to glance for these early signs.

      Dry, flaky skin

    • Next is a thorough physical examination, focusing on— but not limited to— the skin.

      Parasites and infectious conditions should be considered. They are relatively common, and generally reply to appropriate treatments extremely well. They may or may not be the main cause of itching.

    • After bathing and rinsing your dog, gently pour the ACV mixture over her body and legs. Be careful to avoid her nose, ears eyes.
    • Weeds
    • Antifungal Foods

      Coconut Oil

      Coconut oil has antifungal properties and is another excellent food to add to your yeasty dog’s diet.

      It contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid.

      Every of these contribute to coconut oil’s antifungal as well as antibacterial and antiviral properties.

      Always purchase Virgin or Additional Virgin Coconut Oil (they’re the same thing), preferably organic (and non-GMO), freezing pressed, and packaged in a glass jar. Start slowly to avoid loose stool and work up to 1 teaspoon per day per 10 lbs of body weight.

      You can also use coconut oil topically, as you’ll see below.

      Garlic

      As well as being a good natural prebiotic, garlic also has antifungal properties so that’s another reason to feed it to your dog.

      For maximum health benefits, cut unused garlic and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before adding it to your dog’s food. Exposing garlic to air releases allicin, the substance that provides garlic’s numerous health benefits. Here’s some more information about safely giving garlic to your dog.

      Oil Of Oregano

      Oil of oregano also has strong antifungal properties and is another excellent addition to your dog’s diet. It’svery powerful so a drop or two a day is plentyfor most dogs.

      Don’t give it full strength but dilute it in either coconut oil or olive oil, using one drop of oil or oregano per teaspoon of olive or coconut oil. So if you’re already giving your dog coconut oil for her yeast, give it an additional boost with a drop of oil of oregano.

      Constant licking

    • Hair loss

    • Grass
    • Give healing foods love kefir, fermented vegetables and bone broth, as well as supplements love prebiotics, probiotics and digestive enzymes to heal the gut.
    • Cedar chips
    • Ingestion
    • Plastic materials
    • Flavored toothpastes
    • Hair loss

    • Set the mixture aside while you bathe your dog.

    • Wheat, corn, or soy
    • How has it progressed?
    • Keep your pet out of the room at meal times – even a little quantity of food dropped on the floor or licked off a plate can VOID a food trial, and require you to start your 12 week trial period over. Wash the hands and faces of any children after they own eaten.
    • ANY Treats
    • Diagnosis

      Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate and severe allergies. There are several diverse testing methods available.

      The most common is a blood test that checks for antigen induced antibodies in the dog’s blood. Intradermal skin testing may also be performed. In this method of testing, a little quantity of antigen is injected into a shaved portion of the dog’s skin. This is done in a specific pattern and order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the offending antigen can be identified. After a period of time (hours), the shaved area is examined to detect which antigens, if any, created a reaction. Allergy testing is performed to develop a specific therapy for the allergic animal.

      After-Bath Rinse

      Dr Dee Blanco recommends using apple cider vinegar as an after-bath rinse for your dog.Before bathing, prepare a mixture of

      1. Usea coconut-based or unscented, organic shampoo.

      2. ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar to 1 gallon of filtered water (increase the quantities for a large or giant breed dog).
      3. Flavored medications or supplements (use a non-flavored heartworm preventative)
      4. Eggs
      5. Flavored plastic toys
      6. Do not permit your pet exterior unsupervised
      7. Antifungal Foods

        Coconut Oil

        Coconut oil has antifungal properties and is another excellent food to add to your yeasty dog’s diet.

        It contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid.

        Every of these contribute to coconut oil’s antifungal as well as antibacterial and antiviral properties.

        Always purchase Virgin or Additional Virgin Coconut Oil (they’re the same thing), preferably organic (and non-GMO), freezing pressed, and packaged in a glass jar. Start slowly to avoid loose stool and work up to 1 teaspoon per day per 10 lbs of body weight.

        You can also use coconut oil topically, as you’ll see below.

        Garlic

        As well as being a good natural prebiotic, garlic also has antifungal properties so that’s another reason to feed it to your dog.

        For maximum health benefits, cut unused garlic and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before adding it to your dog’s food. Exposing garlic to air releases allicin, the substance that provides garlic’s numerous health benefits. Here’s some more information about safely giving garlic to your dog.

        Oil Of Oregano

        Oil of oregano also has strong antifungal properties and is another excellent addition to your dog’s diet. It’svery powerful so a drop or two a day is plentyfor most dogs. Don’t give it full strength but dilute it in either coconut oil or olive oil, using one drop of oil or oregano per teaspoon of olive or coconut oil.

        So if you’re already giving your dog coconut oil for her yeast, give it an additional boost with a drop of oil of oregano.

        Constant licking

      8. Flea bites
      9. Cow hooves
      10. Addressing the diet and removing processed, starchy foods is paramount. Feed a whole foods, preferably raw, species appropriate diet.
      11. Fabrics
      12. Greenies (contains wheat and soy)
      13. Second, avoid toxins that will stress the immune system. This includes any unnecessary vaccines, drugs and chemicals, including pesticides contained in flea and tick preventatives.

        These every interfere with your dog’s ability to hold her intestinal flora in balance.Focus on building excellent health and supporting your dog’s immune system.

      14. Chronic ear infections

      15. Once the allergens are identified a mixture of these allergens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection – exposing the pet at first to just a little quantity, gradually increasing the dosage over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the allergens.
      16. How To Tell The Difference Between Yeast Infections And Allergies

        There are a few telltale signs that will assist you figure out what’s causing your dog’s problems:

        Chewing or licking the feet, and dark rusty-red hair between the toes.

        The hair is often red or rust-colored because of the yeast (not because of the licking).

        Any black skin, especially where there’s alsohair loss.

        A foul, funky smell and greasy hair (seborrhea), often accompanied by heavy dandruff. This is an athletic fungal infection of the hair follicles.

        Scratching the ears, or head shaking. Ear mites can also cause intense itching in the ears, so make certain your vet actuallytests for these things first before diagnosing your dog.

        Cyclic symptoms (appearing in the spring and “going away” in the fall).

        This is often confused with “grass allergies” and other spring and summer symptoms.

        Hair loss on the tail and upper back.

        Speckles (like tiny black dots) on the underbelly, or grayish or rust coloration around the genitals. Regular grooming should reveal this early indicator of yeast.

        The longer your dog’s yeast infection goes untreated, the harder it will be to resolve, so it’s significant to glance for these early signs.

        Dry, flaky skin

      17. Pig Ears
      18. Foods or food additives such as individualmeats, grains, colorings, or preservatives
      19. Are other pets affected?

        Are you?

      20. Feed every pets in household the limited ingredient diet
      21. These tests work best if performed during the season when the allergies are at their worst
      22. Beef, chicken, or turkey
      23. Do not permit the dog access to the cat’s food or litter box
      24. What own you seen and when did you first see it?
      25. Avoid vaccinations, antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals that damage the gut, as well as other chemicals love flea and tick products.
      26. Supplement with herbs love aloe, slippery elm, deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), L-glutamine, N-acetylglucosamine, marshmallow root, to repair the gut.
      27. First, limit antibiotic use.Antibiotics will destroy the balance in the gut and permit yeast to bloom.
      28. Feed whole fish or a supplement love phytoplankton to provide to supply omega-3 essential fatty acids.
      29. These tests work only for environmental allergens – although there is a blood test available for food allergy testing, results seem to be inconclusive at best.

        Most veterinary dermatologists consent that the best way to determine food allergies is to undertake a food trial.

    Leaky Gut Syndrome

    Yeast often goes hand in hand with leaky gut syndrome, so it’s significant to treat leaky gut as well. Leaky gut means that your dog’s intestinal wall is inflamed and damaged, and yeast can contribute to this damage.

    The intestinal wall is lined with a delicate mucous membrane that allows digested nutrients to enter the bloodstream. Picture a cheesecloth that only lets tiny particles through. This “cheesecloth” also protects the bloodstream from pathogens and undigested food.

    When your dog has a yeast infection, the mucosa can become inflamed.

    This causes the holes in the cheesecloth to get stretched out, letting larger food particles, bacteria and toxins through into the blood stream. This is leaky gut syndrome. The condition sets off a chain reaction in the body:the liver has to work harder to screen out the particles; the immune system tries to prevent the invaders but can’t hold up. The result is inflammation that can lead to numerous types of disease, including skin issues, food sensitivities and allergies, chronic digestive and other disorders, and even autoimmune disease and arthritis.

    Treating leaky gut has some similarities to managing yeast.

    1. Supplement with herbs love aloe, slippery elm, deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), L-glutamine, N-acetylglucosamine, marshmallow root, to repair the gut.
    2. How To Tell The Difference Between Yeast Infections And Allergies

      There are a few telltale signs that will assist you figure out what’s causing your dog’s problems:

      Chewing or licking the feet, and dark rusty-red hair between the toes.

      The hair is often red or rust-colored because of the yeast (not because of the licking).

      Any black skin, especially where there’s alsohair loss.

      A foul, funky smell and greasy hair (seborrhea), often accompanied by heavy dandruff. This is an athletic fungal infection of the hair follicles.

      Scratching the ears, or head shaking. Ear mites can also cause intense itching in the ears, so make certain your vet actuallytests for these things first before diagnosing your dog.

      Cyclic symptoms (appearing in the spring and “going away” in the fall).

      This is often confused with “grass allergies” and other spring and summer symptoms.

      Hair loss on the tail and upper back.

      Speckles (like tiny black dots) on the underbelly, or grayish or rust coloration around the genitals. Regular grooming should reveal this early indicator of yeast.

      The longer your dog’s yeast infection goes untreated, the harder it will be to resolve, so it’s significant to glance for these early signs.

      Dry, flaky skin

    3. Addressing the diet and removing processed, starchy foods is paramount.

      Feed a whole foods, preferably raw, species appropriate diet.

    4. Give healing foods love kefir, fermented vegetables and bone broth, as well as supplements love prebiotics, probiotics and digestive enzymes to heal the gut.
    5. Feed whole fish or a supplement love phytoplankton to provide to supply omega-3 essential fatty acids.
    6. Avoid vaccinations, antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals that damage the gut, as well as other chemicals love flea and tick products.
    7. Antifungal Foods

      Coconut Oil

      Coconut oil has antifungal properties and is another excellent food to add to your yeasty dog’s diet.

      It contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid.

      Every of these contribute to coconut oil’s antifungal as well as antibacterial and antiviral properties.

      Always purchase Virgin or Additional Virgin Coconut Oil (they’re the same thing), preferably organic (and non-GMO), freezing pressed, and packaged in a glass jar. Start slowly to avoid loose stool and work up to 1 teaspoon per day per 10 lbs of body weight.

      You can also use coconut oil topically, as you’ll see below.

      Garlic

      As well as being a good natural prebiotic, garlic also has antifungal properties so that’s another reason to feed it to your dog.

      For maximum health benefits, cut unused garlic and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before adding it to your dog’s food. Exposing garlic to air releases allicin, the substance that provides garlic’s numerous health benefits. Here’s some more information about safely giving garlic to your dog.

      Oil Of Oregano

      Oil of oregano also has strong antifungal properties and is another excellent addition to your dog’s diet. It’svery powerful so a drop or two a day is plentyfor most dogs.

      Don’t give it full strength but dilute it in either coconut oil or olive oil, using one drop of oil or oregano per teaspoon of olive or coconut oil. So if you’re already giving your dog coconut oil for her yeast, give it an additional boost with a drop of oil of oregano.

      Constant licking

    8. Hair loss

    Treating Your Dog’s Yeast Infection

    Since yeast infections startin the gut, one of the first step in treating yeast is to glance at your dog’s diet.In order to grow, yeast needs to eat.

    And yeast loves sugar.

    Your dog might not be eating candy and drinking soda … but foods that contain any type of starch or carbohydrate still feed the yeast in her gut.

    Carbohydrates are complicated chains made up of sugars. When your dog eats them, her body converts them into sugars and this feeds her yeast. Foods love corn, potatoes, rice, peas, sweet potatoes, oats are examples of high carbohydrate foods.

    Take a sliceof bread (which is made of carbohydrates), bite off a piece and hold it in your mouth for half a minute. You’ll notice that it starts to taste sweet.

    That’s because the amylase in your saliva is breaking that starch below into sugar.

    The same thing happens in your dog’s gut … and that sugar feeds her yeast.

    In the wild, the foods your dog’s ancestors ate (as well as the foods that our human ancestors ate), contained about 4% starch.

    Most commercial pet foods own ten times that amount! Even grain-free foods are generally full of potatoes, sweet potatoes or tapioca and own just as much starch as other kibbles.

    The solution is to feed your dog a food low in starches.

    [RELATED]If yeast is a problem, it could be Leaky Gut. Here’s how it harms your dog and how to beat it.

    Probiotics

    Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that assist populate your dog’s gut with “good” bacteria to support herdigestive health.

    Balanced intestinal floraare not just significant for digestive health … but 80% of the immune system lives in your dog’s gut, so this will strengthen her immune system as well

    You can give your dog probiotic supplements or probiotic whole foods.

    Digestive Effects – Digestive symptoms can be the result of a food intolerance or a food allergy, because the immune system may or may not be involved in creating the reaction.

    Symptoms of both an allergy or an intolerance can result in vomiting, diarrhea, and chronic digestive upset.

  • How To Tell The Difference Between Yeast Infections And Allergies

    There are a few telltale signs that will assist you figure out what’s causing your dog’s problems:

    Chewing or licking the feet, and dark rusty-red hair between the toes. The hair is often red or rust-colored because of the yeast (not because of the licking).

    Any black skin, especially where there’s alsohair loss.

    A foul, funky smell and greasy hair (seborrhea), often accompanied by heavy dandruff.

    This is an athletic fungal infection of the hair follicles.

    Scratching the ears, or head shaking. Ear mites can also cause intense itching in the ears, so make certain your vet actuallytests for these things first before diagnosing your dog.

    Cyclic symptoms (appearing in the spring and “going away” in the fall). This is often confused with “grass allergies” and other spring and summer symptoms.

    Hair loss on the tail and upper back.

    Speckles (like tiny black dots) on the underbelly, or grayish or rust coloration around the genitals.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    Regular grooming should reveal this early indicator of yeast.

    The longer your dog’s yeast infection goes untreated, the harder it will be to resolve, so it’s significant to glance for these early signs.

    Dry, flaky skin

  • Antifungal Foods

    Coconut Oil

    Coconut oil has antifungal properties and is another excellent food to add to your yeasty dog’s diet.

    It contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid. Every of these contribute to coconut oil’s antifungal as well as antibacterial and antiviral properties.

    Always purchase Virgin or Additional Virgin Coconut Oil (they’re the same thing), preferably organic (and non-GMO), freezing pressed, and packaged in a glass jar.

    Start slowly to avoid loose stool and work up to 1 teaspoon per day per 10 lbs of body weight.

    You can also use coconut oil topically, as you’ll see below.

    Garlic

    As well as being a good natural prebiotic, garlic also has antifungal properties so that’s another reason to feed it to your dog. For maximum health benefits, cut unused garlic and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before adding it to your dog’s food. Exposing garlic to air releases allicin, the substance that provides garlic’s numerous health benefits.

    Here’s some more information about safely giving garlic to your dog.

    Oil Of Oregano

    Oil of oregano also has strong antifungal properties and is another excellent addition to your dog’s diet. It’svery powerful so a drop or two a day is plentyfor most dogs. Don’t give it full strength but dilute it in either coconut oil or olive oil, using one drop of oil or oregano per teaspoon of olive or coconut oil. So if you’re already giving your dog coconut oil for her yeast, give it an additional boost with a drop of oil of oregano.

    Constant licking

  • Hair loss

  • Diagnosis

    Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate and severe allergies.

    There are several diverse testing methods available. The most common is a blood test that checks for antigen induced antibodies in the dog’s blood. Intradermal skin testing may also be performed. In this method of testing, a little quantity of antigen is injected into a shaved portion of the dog’s skin. This is done in a specific pattern and order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the offending antigen can be identified.

    After a period of time (hours), the shaved area is examined to detect which antigens, if any, created a reaction. Allergy testing is performed to develop a specific therapy for the allergic animal.

    After-Bath Rinse

    Dr Dee Blanco recommends using apple cider vinegar as an after-bath rinse for your dog.Before bathing, prepare a mixture of

    1. Usea coconut-based or unscented, organic shampoo.
    2. Set the mixture aside while you bathe your dog.
    3. ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar to 1 gallon of filtered water (increase the quantities for a large or giant breed dog).
    4. After bathing and rinsing your dog, gently pour the ACV mixture over her body and legs.

      Be careful to avoid her nose, ears eyes.

    Is your dog constantly licking and scratching? If so, you’re not alone. Numerous dogs lick and scratch as result of itching (also called pruritis). The itching may be minimal or extreme, and can even cause injury.

    Itching is a characteristic of numerous possible skinconditions and, treating an itch effectively requires determining the underlying cause. This is not a road you desire to go below alone. Finding the cause of an itch requires testing, and assist from your veterinarian.

    What might make my dog itchy?
    It is significant to remember that itching is not a disease, or a cause of disease, but rather the result of a disease process.

    Effectively treating itching requires treating its cause. If your dog is frequently itchy, you may first suspect a problem with fleas. It’s a common assumption, but fleas are far from the only cause of skin irritations and itches. That said, your dog should absolutely be on year-round flea and tick preventative.

    The most common wide causes of itching are:

    Some diseases only start to itch when a dog develops secondary bacterial or yeast infections. Whatever the cause, it’s understandable that intense itching is a serious source of distress for your dog.

    Dog allergies
    Exposure to allergens may happen any number of ways:

    1. Topical exposure
    2. Inhalation
    3. Ingestion

    All may result in a cascade of inflammatory chemicals from cells in the skin.

    A dog may show allergic signs love itching when his immune systems begins to recognize everyday substances (allergens) as dangerous. Allergic conditions will also be considered by your veterinarian and efforts made to identify the causative agent, as well as attempt to block the allergic reactions.

    Atopic or allergic dermatitis is associated with inhaled or even topical materials that enter the body and trigger an excessive release of inflammatory secretions that result in itch.

    Interpreting allergy tests requires experience and you may even need a specialist.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    There are recent developments in the treatment of allergies and allergic reaction. Enquire your veterinarian what can be done.

    Diagnosing an itchy dog
    Determining the cause begins with your veterinarian taking a detailed medical and chronological history:

    1. Are other pets affected? Are you?
    2. Next is a thorough physical examination, focusing on— but not limited to— the skin. Parasites and infectious conditions should be considered. They are relatively common, and generally reply to appropriate treatments extremely well.

      They may or may not be the main cause of itching.

    3. What own you seen and when did you first see it?
    4. How has it progressed?
    5. Chronic ear infections

    Is your pet prone to allergies?

    How will you know if your dog has or could develop allergies? Love humans, dogs and cats must be exposed to the allergen for some time before an allergy develops, giving the body time to mount its immune response – the dog’s body must study to react to the allergen.

    In dogs, allergies may start at any age. Most, however, start to develop between one and three years of age. To make matters worse, as the dog ages, his response to allergens may become more severe, or he can develop allergies to additional things. In some breeds, an allergy is ‘learned’ and then genetically programmed, passing from generation to generation. Thus, allergies can be genetically linked. Allergies are more common in certain breeds such as Scottish Terriers, West Highland White Terriers, Lhasa Apsos, Bichon Frise, Maltese, Labrador and Golden Retrievers, Dalmations, Pugs, Sharpeis, Cocker Spaniels, Miniature Schnauzers, and English Bulldogs.

    Types of Allergies in Pets

    Allergens can take numerous forms: they can be inhaled love pollen and chemicals; they can result from physical contact, also known as contact dermatitis; and they can be ingested as in the case with medication or food allergies.

    There are several causes of allergies in pets – most notably Atopy – which is an environmental or inhalant allergy; contact and flea allergies; and food allergies and intolerances. There are numerous conditions which cause problems with a dog or cat’s skin, but the most common, by far, is allergies. Allergies can be a chronic problem, or episodic in nature.

    Common allergens include:

    1. Pollen
    2. Fabrics
    3. Foods or food additives such as individualmeats, grains, colorings, or preservatives
    4. Trees
    5. Grass
    6. Beef, chicken, or turkey
    7. Plastic materials
    8. Dust mites
    9. Wheat, corn, or soy
    10. Weeds
    11. Cedar chips
    12. Eggs
    13. Dairy products
    14. Flea bites


    A pet who is allergic to something will generally show its allergic reaction through skin problems and itching, or pruritus.

    It may seem logical that if a dog is allergic to something he inhales (atopy), such as pollen or grasses, he will own a runny nose; if he is allergic to something he eats (food allergy) such as beef or dairy, he may vomit; or if he has a contact allergy (contact dermatitis or flea allergy) he may own swelling and itching at the site of contact. In reality, dogs rarely own signs this specific. Instead, most allergies symptoms consist of mild to severe itching every over the body, whether caused by environmental or food allergies; some allergies are also characterized by chronic ear infections.

    The dog may also show digestive symptoms — both a food allergy and a food intolerance can be characterized by vomiting, excess gas, or chronic diarrhea.

    Since the symptoms are the same for an allergy or intolerance, it is almost impossible to know which your pet suffers from. Both are treated in the same manner by utilizing a food trial.

    Managing Allergy Symptoms

    How do I know what type of allergies my dog has?

    The short answer is, you don’t! Intradermal skin testing is the method recommended by veterinary dermatologists and is practical and precise way to pinpoint your pet’s environmental allergies.

    Identifying the cause of a food allergy is often a system of trial and error; thus most dogs with allergies are managed in a multi-level approach — most allergies can be managed appropriately with a combination of avoidance, supplementation, medication as sure by your veterinarian, and food trials. Due to the fact that numerous other problems can cause similar symptoms, and that numerous times animals are suffering from more problems than just food allergies, it is significant that every other problems are properly identified and treated prior to undergoing treatment for allergies.

    Flea bite allergies, intestinal parasite hypersensitivities, sarcoptic or demodectic mange, and yeast or bacterial infections can cause similar symptoms as both environmental and food allergies. Every likely causes should be appropriately addressed by your veterinarian.

    First Things First

    Because there are so numerous variables in a pet’s environment, and numerous dogs with allergies own both food and environmental allergies, changing food is often an simple first step in helping manage allergy symptoms. It is estimated that food allergies plus atopy account about 50% of the causes of itching and scratching.


    ​Food allergies can affect both dogs and cats, and unlike atopy there is no strong link between specific breeds and food allergies.

    Food allergies affect both males and females, neutered and intact animals equally. They can show up as early as six months of age to any time in life, though most happen between two and six years ancient. Numerous animals with food allergies also own concurrent inhalant or contact environmental allergies – thus, using a hypo-allergenic diet may alleviate symptoms dramatically, but it may not provide 100% improvement.

    Food Allergies

    The symptoms of food allergies are similar to those of most allergies seen in dogs and cats. The primary symptom is itchy skin, often affecting the face, feet, ears, paws, armpits, and underside.

    Symptoms may also include chronic or recurrent ear infections, hair loss, excessive scratching, boiling spots, and skin infections that reply to antibiotics but reoccur after antibiotics are discontinued. It is hard to distinguish an animal suffering from food allergies from an animal suffering from atopy or other environmental allergies based on physical signs alone. However, there are a few signs that increase the suspicion that food allergies may be present.

    • Recurrent ear infections, especially yeast infections
    • Age of dog – a extremely young dog with moderate or severe skin problems is more likely to be suffering from a food allergy
    • Allergy symptoms are year circular, with change in seasons offering no relief to itchiness
    • Allergy symptoms such as itching do not reply to steroid treatment

    Food Intolerance

    A food intolerance differs from a food allergy in that it is not a true allergy, thus there is no immune response from the body.

    Symptoms of a food intolerance are generally gastro-intestinal in nature, causing vomiting, excess gas, diarrhea, or chronic loose stool. Treatment of a food intolerance can be approached the same way as food allergy – with a food trial.

    Food Trials and Elimination Diets

    When a pet is suspected of having a food allergy, it is recommended they undergo a food trial. During a food trial, an animal is fed a diet consisting of a novel protein and a novel carbohydrate source that the animal has never eaten before.

    Remember, an allergen response requires repeated exposure, so feeding something the pet has never had before decreases the likelihood of an allergic response. Thus the ingredients that own been most common in pet food in the past are the most common culprits today. Common allergens in pet foods are beef, dairy products, chicken, turkey, egg, wheat, corn, and soy. These are the ingredients you should attempt to avoid! There are a number of limited ingredient diets available; such as, Herring & Green Pea, Duck & Potato, Venison & Potato, or Salmon & Rice. You should check carefully and read the ingredient listing to make certain your trial diet contains only those ingredients.

    Often times even though a product is labeled “Lamb & Rice”, it contains other ingredients love chicken or corn.

    Veterinarians used to recommend that a pet only needed to be placed on a special diet for 3-4 weeks, but new studies show that in dogs, only 26% of those with food allergies responded by day 21. However, the vast majority responded within a 12 week time frame. Therefore, it is extremely significant to hold the pet on the limited diet for the entire 12 weeks.

    If there is no change in symptoms but a food allergy is still strongly suspected, then another food trial using a diverse novel food source could be tried.


    *DURING A FOOD TRIAL, ONLY THE RECOMMENDED DIET MUST BE FED*

    *DO NOT GIVE*

    1. ANY ‘people’ food
    2. Flavored medications or supplements (use a non-flavored heartworm preventative)
    3. ANY Treats
    4. Cow hooves
    5. Greenies (contains wheat and soy)
    6. Rawhides (may contain beef or pork)
    7. Flavored toothpastes
    8. Pig Ears
    9. Flavored plastic toys

    Other food trial hints:

    1. Do not permit the dog access to the cat’s food or litter box
    2. Keep your pet out of the room at meal times – even a little quantity of food dropped on the floor or licked off a plate can VOID a food trial, and require you to start your 12 week trial period over.

      Wash the hands and faces of any children after they own eaten.

    3. If you desire to give a treat, use the limited ingredient food, or the same food’s canned version – the canned food can also be used to give a pill or to stir medication with
    4. Feed every pets in household the limited ingredient diet
    5. If other pets eat a diverse food, feed them in an entirely diverse room, so there is no chance the pet with allergies can own access to the other food
    6. Do not permit your pet exterior unsupervised


    Environmental Allergies

    A large portion of allergies are environmental allergies – most of these are the inhalant type and are seasonal, with symptoms present only at certain times of the year.

    Numerous of these dogs suffer from intense itching, generally only seasonally initially, but symptoms can turn into a year circular problem.

    Allergy Testing

    Allergy testing should be considered for any animal that is suffering from allergies that happen for more than four months out of the year, or do not reply to initial treatment. If allergy testing is recommended, consult with your veterinarian or a board certified Veterinary Dermatologist.

    A definitive diagnosis of an allergy and determination of exactly what the animal is allergic to can be made by consulting with your veterinarian for allergy testing. There are two basic types of allergy testing –

    Blood Testing – There are two types of blood tests used, the RAST and ELISA tests.

    In either one, a blood sample is drawn from the suspected atopic dog and screened for a reaction to a wide range of allergens including pollens, dust, grass, and molds common to your geographical area. Though this test can be used, because it was initially developed for humans, the antibodies that they test for are diverse in dogs and cats than in people. The result is that there are a lot of untrue positives, and the test could indicate that your pet is allergic to things when he is really not. For this reason, veterinary dermatologists recommend intradermal skin testing.

    Intradermal Skin Testing – This test is considered the “gold standard” of allergy testing for atopy.

    The animal is sedated, and an area on his side is shaved in a patch below to the skin. A grid is laid out and little injections are made, done in order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the allergy causing antigen can be identified. A veterinary dermatologist specializes in these, and is the best person to read such tests. Before undergoing such testing, the pet needs to be off every medications, specifically steroids.

    The blood test and intradermal skin test own some similarities:

    1. Once the allergens are identified a mixture of these allergens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection – exposing the pet at first to just a little quantity, gradually increasing the dosage over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the allergens.
    2. These tests work best if performed during the season when the allergies are at their worst
    3. These tests work only for environmental allergens – although there is a blood test available for food allergy testing, results seem to be inconclusive at best.

      Most veterinary dermatologists consent that the best way to determine food allergies is to undertake a food trial.


    Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate to severe allergies. With appropriate testing, the hyposensitization injections own had excellent results in desensitizing your pet and reducing environmental allergy symptoms in numerous dogs.

    Veterinary dermatologist Dr. Gordon has found that with the appropriate desensitizing injections, one-third of treated patients improve to the point they are eventually capable to discontinue every therapy.

    Treatment

    There are numerous options for treating dogs with allergies.

    Until the cause of an allergy is pinpointed, it is hard to come up with the appropriate treatment. In the mean time, management practices love conducting a food trial and minimizing exposure to potential allergens can assist in reducing symptoms.

    Food Allergies

    A dog with food allergies requires no ‘treatment’, per se, owners just need to make certain their pet’s food does not contain the problem causing ingredient. Unfortunately, it can be a endless process to attempt and figure out what the offending ingredient is! A strict food trial is the best way to manage your pet’s food allergies.

    Environmental Allergies

    Without appropriate allergy testing, it is almost impossible to decipher what environmental component your pet is allergic to.

    You can attempt limiting your pet’s exposure to possible or known allergens by using avoidance.

    Avoidance

    Avoidance can be extremely useful in managing atopy. While it may be impossible to eliminate every of the offending allergens, numerous can be greatly reduced by managing their environment. Avoidance is rarely 100% effective when used by itself, but can greatly reduce allergy symptoms.

    Medications

    Veterinarian Prescribed

    For cases where exposure to the allergen cannot be controlled, such as in the case of a seasonal allergy, a veterinarian can prescribe your pet the correct dosage of an anti-histamine to assist alleviate symptoms.

    Anti-histamines assist control the immune system’s over-zealous response to an allergy, which then alleviates the symptoms. Steroids are also often prescribed by veterinarians to assist alleviate symptoms, but unfortunately they just mask the symptoms, not actually reduce the problem. They can also own serious side effects due to endless term use, and should always be used under the supervision of a veterinarian. Secondary infection is also common in allergy affected dogs, due to the pet itching and biting at their skin. Antibiotic treatment is often required to heal the resulting skin infection. Since bacterial and yeast skin infections are common in dogs with allergies, it is significant to treat these infections as well as the atopy.

    Consult with your veterinarian to discover the appropriate medications for your allergy prone pet.

    Over the Counter

    Not numerous over the counter oral medications are available to reduce itchiness in pets. However, Omega-3 fatty acids own been shown to be extremely beneficial in the management of allergies in dogs and cats. Fatty acids own been recommended for years to improve overall skin and jacket quality, and it is now known that they work in the skin to assist reduce the quantity and effects of histamine and other chemicals that are released in response to allergies. The quantity of success varies – some pets show little to no improvement, most show moderate improvement, and some seem to reply with a finish cure.

    Most pets need to be on the omega-3 fatty acids daily for several weeks to months to notice significant improvement. Omega-3 fatty acids are considered extremely safe and own extremely few side effects. It is significant to use a fatty acid supplement derived from fish body oil, as other types of fatty acids – love omega-6 fatty acids – can actually create an inflammatory response, making allergies worse.

    Topical Treatments

    The first step in topically managing a pet’s environmental allergies is to simply wash off the dog’s feet and underside after he comes in from the exterior.

    This will remove any allergens he came in contact with.

    Other topical therapy consists of shampoos, rinses, and topical anti-itch solutions. This type of management offers immediate but short-term relief. Numerous over the counter sprays contain ingredients such as topical anesthetics to lessen the severity of the itching, an antibiotic to prevent secondary infection, and a bittering agent to prevent constant chewing. It is often recommended to bathe atopic dogs every two weeks or so with a hypoallergenic or oatmeal shampoo. Weekly or even twice weekly baths may offer increased relief for some dogs.

    Topical sprays or solutions containing steroids such as hydrocortisone may offer additional relief.

    They are most appropriate when treating localized itching, and as they are used in moderation and are not readily absorbed into the bloodstream, do not create the long-term side effects associated with oral or injectable steroids. Consult with your veterinarian for treatment with any steroid containing products.

    Dealing With Allergies

    Trying to pinpoint the source of your pet’s allergies can be a time-consuming and frustrating experience.

    Using a combination of diagnostic tools, managing a food trial, and utilizing various treatment options, you can go a endless way to helping your dog live a more comfortable life.

    Still need help?

    PetPeople is greatful for the guidance and support of Dr. John Gordon, DVM, Dip. ACVD.

    CONTACT INFO:
    Dr. John Gordon, DVM, Dip. ACVD
    Board certified veterinary dermatologist
    Medical & Cancer Middle for Pets
    300 E. Wilson Bridge Rd.
    Worthington, OH 43085
    Phone: (614) 846-5800
    (800) 891-9010
    Fax: (614) 846-5803

    Find a Veterinary Dematologist near you.

    If your dog suffers seasonal allergies and you desire to use natural remedies instead of steroids or medications, there are several options available that can assist your pup.

    Seasonal allergies can cause sinus inflammation, sneezing, coughing, excessive mucous, runny eyes, yeast infections, and skin irritations love rashes and boiling spots.

    The natural remedies under can fight those symptoms while avoiding the potentially harmful side effects of numerous medications. Discuss them with your vet before you make any changes.

    Here are eight natural remedies for dogs that can assist fight symptoms of seasonal allergies.

    Leaky Gut Syndrome

    Yeast often goes hand in hand with leaky gut syndrome, so it’s significant to treat leaky gut as well.

    Leaky gut means that your dog’s intestinal wall is inflamed and damaged, and yeast can contribute to this damage.

    The intestinal wall is lined with a delicate mucous membrane that allows digested nutrients to enter the bloodstream. Picture a cheesecloth that only lets tiny particles through. This “cheesecloth” also protects the bloodstream from pathogens and undigested food.

    When your dog has a yeast infection, the mucosa can become inflamed.

    This causes the holes in the cheesecloth to get stretched out, letting larger food particles, bacteria and toxins through into the blood stream. This is leaky gut syndrome. The condition sets off a chain reaction in the body:the liver has to work harder to screen out the particles; the immune system tries to prevent the invaders but can’t hold up. The result is inflammation that can lead to numerous types of disease, including skin issues, food sensitivities and allergies, chronic digestive and other disorders, and even autoimmune disease and arthritis.

    Treating leaky gut has some similarities to managing yeast.

    1. Supplement with herbs love aloe, slippery elm, deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), L-glutamine, N-acetylglucosamine, marshmallow root, to repair the gut.
    2. How To Tell The Difference Between Yeast Infections And Allergies

      There are a few telltale signs that will assist you figure out what’s causing your dog’s problems:

      Chewing or licking the feet, and dark rusty-red hair between the toes.

      The hair is often red or rust-colored because of the yeast (not because of the licking).

      Any black skin, especially where there’s alsohair loss.

      A foul, funky smell and greasy hair (seborrhea), often accompanied by heavy dandruff. This is an athletic fungal infection of the hair follicles.

      Scratching the ears, or head shaking. Ear mites can also cause intense itching in the ears, so make certain your vet actuallytests for these things first before diagnosing your dog.

      Cyclic symptoms (appearing in the spring and “going away” in the fall).

      This is often confused with “grass allergies” and other spring and summer symptoms.

      Hair loss on the tail and upper back.

      Speckles (like tiny black dots) on the underbelly, or grayish or rust coloration around the genitals. Regular grooming should reveal this early indicator of yeast.

      The longer your dog’s yeast infection goes untreated, the harder it will be to resolve, so it’s significant to glance for these early signs.

      Dry, flaky skin

    3. Addressing the diet and removing processed, starchy foods is paramount.

      Feed a whole foods, preferably raw, species appropriate diet.

    4. Give healing foods love kefir, fermented vegetables and bone broth, as well as supplements love prebiotics, probiotics and digestive enzymes to heal the gut.
    5. Feed whole fish or a supplement love phytoplankton to provide to supply omega-3 essential fatty acids.
    6. Avoid vaccinations, antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals that damage the gut, as well as other chemicals love flea and tick products.
    7. Antifungal Foods

      Coconut Oil

      Coconut oil has antifungal properties and is another excellent food to add to your yeasty dog’s diet.

      It contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid.

      Every of these contribute to coconut oil’s antifungal as well as antibacterial and antiviral properties.

      Always purchase Virgin or Additional Virgin Coconut Oil (they’re the same thing), preferably organic (and non-GMO), freezing pressed, and packaged in a glass jar. Start slowly to avoid loose stool and work up to 1 teaspoon per day per 10 lbs of body weight.

      You can also use coconut oil topically, as you’ll see below.

      Garlic

      As well as being a good natural prebiotic, garlic also has antifungal properties so that’s another reason to feed it to your dog.

      For maximum health benefits, cut unused garlic and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before adding it to your dog’s food. Exposing garlic to air releases allicin, the substance that provides garlic’s numerous health benefits. Here’s some more information about safely giving garlic to your dog.

      Oil Of Oregano

      Oil of oregano also has strong antifungal properties and is another excellent addition to your dog’s diet. It’svery powerful so a drop or two a day is plentyfor most dogs.

      Don’t give it full strength but dilute it in either coconut oil or olive oil, using one drop of oil or oregano per teaspoon of olive or coconut oil. So if you’re already giving your dog coconut oil for her yeast, give it an additional boost with a drop of oil of oregano.

      Constant licking

    8. Hair loss

    Treating Your Dog’s Yeast Infection

    Since yeast infections startin the gut, one of the first step in treating yeast is to glance at your dog’s diet.In order to grow, yeast needs to eat.

    And yeast loves sugar.

    Your dog might not be eating candy and drinking soda … but foods that contain any type of starch or carbohydrate still feed the yeast in her gut.

    Carbohydrates are complicated chains made up of sugars. When your dog eats them, her body converts them into sugars and this feeds her yeast. Foods love corn, potatoes, rice, peas, sweet potatoes, oats are examples of high carbohydrate foods.

    Take a sliceof bread (which is made of carbohydrates), bite off a piece and hold it in your mouth for half a minute.

    You’ll notice that it starts to taste sweet.

    That’s because the amylase in your saliva is breaking that starch below into sugar. The same thing happens in your dog’s gut … and that sugar feeds her yeast.

    In the wild, the foods your dog’s ancestors ate (as well as the foods that our human ancestors ate), contained about 4% starch.

    Most commercial pet foods own ten times that amount! Even grain-free foods are generally full of potatoes, sweet potatoes or tapioca and own just as much starch as other kibbles.

    The solution is to feed your dog a food low in starches.

    [RELATED]If yeast is a problem, it could be Leaky Gut.

    Here’s how it harms your dog and how to beat it.

    Probiotics

    Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that assist populate your dog’s gut with “good” bacteria to support herdigestive health.

    Balanced intestinal floraare not just significant for digestive health … but 80% of the immune system lives in your dog’s gut, so this will strengthen her immune system as well

    You can give your dog probiotic supplements or probiotic whole foods.

    Digestive Effects – Digestive symptoms can be the result of a food intolerance or a food allergy, because the immune system may or may not be involved in creating the reaction. Symptoms of both an allergy or an intolerance can result in vomiting, diarrhea, and chronic digestive upset.

  • How To Tell The Difference Between Yeast Infections And Allergies

    There are a few telltale signs that will assist you figure out what’s causing your dog’s problems:

    Chewing or licking the feet, and dark rusty-red hair between the toes.

    The hair is often red or rust-colored because of the yeast (not because of the licking).

    Any black skin, especially where there’s alsohair loss.

    A foul, funky smell and greasy hair (seborrhea), often accompanied by heavy dandruff. This is an athletic fungal infection of the hair follicles.

    Scratching the ears, or head shaking. Ear mites can also cause intense itching in the ears, so make certain your vet actuallytests for these things first before diagnosing your dog.

    Cyclic symptoms (appearing in the spring and “going away” in the fall). This is often confused with “grass allergies” and other spring and summer symptoms.

    Hair loss on the tail and upper back.

    Speckles (like tiny black dots) on the underbelly, or grayish or rust coloration around the genitals.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    Regular grooming should reveal this early indicator of yeast.

    The longer your dog’s yeast infection goes untreated, the harder it will be to resolve, so it’s significant to glance for these early signs.

    Dry, flaky skin

  • Antifungal Foods

    Coconut Oil

    Coconut oil has antifungal properties and is another excellent food to add to your yeasty dog’s diet.

    It contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are made up of lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid.

    Every of these contribute to coconut oil’s antifungal as well as antibacterial and antiviral properties.

    Always purchase Virgin or Additional Virgin Coconut Oil (they’re the same thing), preferably organic (and non-GMO), freezing pressed, and packaged in a glass jar. Start slowly to avoid loose stool and work up to 1 teaspoon per day per 10 lbs of body weight.

    You can also use coconut oil topically, as you’ll see below.

    Garlic

    As well as being a good natural prebiotic, garlic also has antifungal properties so that’s another reason to feed it to your dog.

    For maximum health benefits, cut unused garlic and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before adding it to your dog’s food. Exposing garlic to air releases allicin, the substance that provides garlic’s numerous health benefits. Here’s some more information about safely giving garlic to your dog.

    Oil Of Oregano

    Oil of oregano also has strong antifungal properties and is another excellent addition to your dog’s diet. It’svery powerful so a drop or two a day is plentyfor most dogs. Don’t give it full strength but dilute it in either coconut oil or olive oil, using one drop of oil or oregano per teaspoon of olive or coconut oil.

    So if you’re already giving your dog coconut oil for her yeast, give it an additional boost with a drop of oil of oregano.

    Constant licking

  • Hair loss

  • Diagnosis

    Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate and severe allergies. There are several diverse testing methods available.

    The most common is a blood test that checks for antigen induced antibodies in the dog’s blood. Intradermal skin testing may also be performed. In this method of testing, a little quantity of antigen is injected into a shaved portion of the dog’s skin. This is done in a specific pattern and order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the offending antigen can be identified. After a period of time (hours), the shaved area is examined to detect which antigens, if any, created a reaction. Allergy testing is performed to develop a specific therapy for the allergic animal.

    After-Bath Rinse

    Dr Dee Blanco recommends using apple cider vinegar as an after-bath rinse for your dog.Before bathing, prepare a mixture of

    1. Usea coconut-based or unscented, organic shampoo.

    2. Set the mixture aside while you bathe your dog.
    3. ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar to 1 gallon of filtered water (increase the quantities for a large or giant breed dog).
    4. After bathing and rinsing your dog, gently pour the ACV mixture over her body and legs. Be careful to avoid her nose, ears eyes.

    Is your dog constantly licking and scratching? If so, you’re not alone. Numerous dogs lick and scratch as result of itching (also called pruritis). The itching may be minimal or extreme, and can even cause injury.

    Itching is a characteristic of numerous possible skinconditions and, treating an itch effectively requires determining the underlying cause.

    This is not a road you desire to go below alone. Finding the cause of an itch requires testing, and assist from your veterinarian.

    What might make my dog itchy?
    It is significant to remember that itching is not a disease, or a cause of disease, but rather the result of a disease process. Effectively treating itching requires treating its cause. If your dog is frequently itchy, you may first suspect a problem with fleas. It’s a common assumption, but fleas are far from the only cause of skin irritations and itches.

    That said, your dog should absolutely be on year-round flea and tick preventative.

    The most common wide causes of itching are:

    Some diseases only start to itch when a dog develops secondary bacterial or yeast infections. Whatever the cause, it’s understandable that intense itching is a serious source of distress for your dog.

    Dog allergies
    Exposure to allergens may happen any number of ways:

    1. Topical exposure
    2. Inhalation
    3. Ingestion

    All may result in a cascade of inflammatory chemicals from cells in the skin.

    A dog may show allergic signs love itching when his immune systems begins to recognize everyday substances (allergens) as dangerous.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    Allergic conditions will also be considered by your veterinarian and efforts made to identify the causative agent, as well as attempt to block the allergic reactions.

    Atopic or allergic dermatitis is associated with inhaled or even topical materials that enter the body and trigger an excessive release of inflammatory secretions that result in itch.

    Interpreting allergy tests requires experience and you may even need a specialist.

    There are recent developments in the treatment of allergies and allergic reaction.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    Enquire your veterinarian what can be done.

    Diagnosing an itchy dog
    Determining the cause begins with your veterinarian taking a detailed medical and chronological history:

    1. Are other pets affected? Are you?
    2. Next is a thorough physical examination, focusing on— but not limited to— the skin. Parasites and infectious conditions should be considered.

      What causes yeast allergies in dogs

      They are relatively common, and generally reply to appropriate treatments extremely well. They may or may not be the main cause of itching.

    3. What own you seen and when did you first see it?
    4. How has it progressed?
    5. Chronic ear infections

    Is your pet prone to allergies?

    How will you know if your dog has or could develop allergies? Love humans, dogs and cats must be exposed to the allergen for some time before an allergy develops, giving the body time to mount its immune response – the dog’s body must study to react to the allergen.

    In dogs, allergies may start at any age. Most, however, start to develop between one and three years of age. To make matters worse, as the dog ages, his response to allergens may become more severe, or he can develop allergies to additional things. In some breeds, an allergy is ‘learned’ and then genetically programmed, passing from generation to generation. Thus, allergies can be genetically linked. Allergies are more common in certain breeds such as Scottish Terriers, West Highland White Terriers, Lhasa Apsos, Bichon Frise, Maltese, Labrador and Golden Retrievers, Dalmations, Pugs, Sharpeis, Cocker Spaniels, Miniature Schnauzers, and English Bulldogs.

    Types of Allergies in Pets

    Allergens can take numerous forms: they can be inhaled love pollen and chemicals; they can result from physical contact, also known as contact dermatitis; and they can be ingested as in the case with medication or food allergies.

    There are several causes of allergies in pets – most notably Atopy – which is an environmental or inhalant allergy; contact and flea allergies; and food allergies and intolerances. There are numerous conditions which cause problems with a dog or cat’s skin, but the most common, by far, is allergies. Allergies can be a chronic problem, or episodic in nature.

    Common allergens include:

    1. Pollen
    2. Fabrics
    3. Foods or food additives such as individualmeats, grains, colorings, or preservatives
    4. Trees
    5. Grass
    6. Beef, chicken, or turkey
    7. Plastic materials
    8. Dust mites
    9. Wheat, corn, or soy
    10. Weeds
    11. Cedar chips
    12. Eggs
    13. Dairy products
    14. Flea bites


    A pet who is allergic to something will generally show its allergic reaction through skin problems and itching, or pruritus.

    It may seem logical that if a dog is allergic to something he inhales (atopy), such as pollen or grasses, he will own a runny nose; if he is allergic to something he eats (food allergy) such as beef or dairy, he may vomit; or if he has a contact allergy (contact dermatitis or flea allergy) he may own swelling and itching at the site of contact. In reality, dogs rarely own signs this specific. Instead, most allergies symptoms consist of mild to severe itching every over the body, whether caused by environmental or food allergies; some allergies are also characterized by chronic ear infections.

    The dog may also show digestive symptoms — both a food allergy and a food intolerance can be characterized by vomiting, excess gas, or chronic diarrhea.

    Since the symptoms are the same for an allergy or intolerance, it is almost impossible to know which your pet suffers from. Both are treated in the same manner by utilizing a food trial.

    Managing Allergy Symptoms

    How do I know what type of allergies my dog has?

    The short answer is, you don’t! Intradermal skin testing is the method recommended by veterinary dermatologists and is practical and precise way to pinpoint your pet’s environmental allergies. Identifying the cause of a food allergy is often a system of trial and error; thus most dogs with allergies are managed in a multi-level approach — most allergies can be managed appropriately with a combination of avoidance, supplementation, medication as sure by your veterinarian, and food trials.

    Due to the fact that numerous other problems can cause similar symptoms, and that numerous times animals are suffering from more problems than just food allergies, it is significant that every other problems are properly identified and treated prior to undergoing treatment for allergies. Flea bite allergies, intestinal parasite hypersensitivities, sarcoptic or demodectic mange, and yeast or bacterial infections can cause similar symptoms as both environmental and food allergies. Every likely causes should be appropriately addressed by your veterinarian.

    First Things First

    Because there are so numerous variables in a pet’s environment, and numerous dogs with allergies own both food and environmental allergies, changing food is often an simple first step in helping manage allergy symptoms.

    It is estimated that food allergies plus atopy account about 50% of the causes of itching and scratching.


    ​Food allergies can affect both dogs and cats, and unlike atopy there is no strong link between specific breeds and food allergies. Food allergies affect both males and females, neutered and intact animals equally.

    What causes yeast allergies in dogs

    They can show up as early as six months of age to any time in life, though most happen between two and six years ancient. Numerous animals with food allergies also own concurrent inhalant or contact environmental allergies – thus, using a hypo-allergenic diet may alleviate symptoms dramatically, but it may not provide 100% improvement.

    Food Allergies

    The symptoms of food allergies are similar to those of most allergies seen in dogs and cats.

    The primary symptom is itchy skin, often affecting the face, feet, ears, paws, armpits, and underside. Symptoms may also include chronic or recurrent ear infections, hair loss, excessive scratching, boiling spots, and skin infections that reply to antibiotics but reoccur after antibiotics are discontinued. It is hard to distinguish an animal suffering from food allergies from an animal suffering from atopy or other environmental allergies based on physical signs alone. However, there are a few signs that increase the suspicion that food allergies may be present.

    • Recurrent ear infections, especially yeast infections
    • Age of dog – a extremely young dog with moderate or severe skin problems is more likely to be suffering from a food allergy
    • Allergy symptoms are year circular, with change in seasons offering no relief to itchiness
    • Allergy symptoms such as itching do not reply to steroid treatment

    Food Intolerance

    A food intolerance differs from a food allergy in that it is not a true allergy, thus there is no immune response from the body.

    Symptoms of a food intolerance are generally gastro-intestinal in nature, causing vomiting, excess gas, diarrhea, or chronic loose stool. Treatment of a food intolerance can be approached the same way as food allergy – with a food trial.

    Food Trials and Elimination Diets

    When a pet is suspected of having a food allergy, it is recommended they undergo a food trial. During a food trial, an animal is fed a diet consisting of a novel protein and a novel carbohydrate source that the animal has never eaten before.

    Remember, an allergen response requires repeated exposure, so feeding something the pet has never had before decreases the likelihood of an allergic response. Thus the ingredients that own been most common in pet food in the past are the most common culprits today. Common allergens in pet foods are beef, dairy products, chicken, turkey, egg, wheat, corn, and soy. These are the ingredients you should attempt to avoid! There are a number of limited ingredient diets available; such as, Herring & Green Pea, Duck & Potato, Venison & Potato, or Salmon & Rice.

    You should check carefully and read the ingredient listing to make certain your trial diet contains only those ingredients. Often times even though a product is labeled “Lamb & Rice”, it contains other ingredients love chicken or corn.

    Veterinarians used to recommend that a pet only needed to be placed on a special diet for 3-4 weeks, but new studies show that in dogs, only 26% of those with food allergies responded by day 21. However, the vast majority responded within a 12 week time frame. Therefore, it is extremely significant to hold the pet on the limited diet for the entire 12 weeks.

    If there is no change in symptoms but a food allergy is still strongly suspected, then another food trial using a diverse novel food source could be tried.


    *DURING A FOOD TRIAL, ONLY THE RECOMMENDED DIET MUST BE FED*

    *DO NOT GIVE*

    1. ANY ‘people’ food
    2. Flavored medications or supplements (use a non-flavored heartworm preventative)
    3. ANY Treats
    4. Cow hooves
    5. Greenies (contains wheat and soy)
    6. Rawhides (may contain beef or pork)
    7. Flavored toothpastes
    8. Pig Ears
    9. Flavored plastic toys

    Other food trial hints:

    1. Do not permit the dog access to the cat’s food or litter box
    2. Keep your pet out of the room at meal times – even a little quantity of food dropped on the floor or licked off a plate can VOID a food trial, and require you to start your 12 week trial period over.

      Wash the hands and faces of any children after they own eaten.

    3. If you desire to give a treat, use the limited ingredient food, or the same food’s canned version – the canned food can also be used to give a pill or to stir medication with
    4. Feed every pets in household the limited ingredient diet
    5. If other pets eat a diverse food, feed them in an entirely diverse room, so there is no chance the pet with allergies can own access to the other food
    6. Do not permit your pet exterior unsupervised


    Environmental Allergies

    A large portion of allergies are environmental allergies – most of these are the inhalant type and are seasonal, with symptoms present only at certain times of the year.

    Numerous of these dogs suffer from intense itching, generally only seasonally initially, but symptoms can turn into a year circular problem.

    Allergy Testing

    Allergy testing should be considered for any animal that is suffering from allergies that happen for more than four months out of the year, or do not reply to initial treatment. If allergy testing is recommended, consult with your veterinarian or a board certified Veterinary Dermatologist.

    A definitive diagnosis of an allergy and determination of exactly what the animal is allergic to can be made by consulting with your veterinarian for allergy testing.

    There are two basic types of allergy testing –

    Blood Testing – There are two types of blood tests used, the RAST and ELISA tests. In either one, a blood sample is drawn from the suspected atopic dog and screened for a reaction to a wide range of allergens including pollens, dust, grass, and molds common to your geographical area. Though this test can be used, because it was initially developed for humans, the antibodies that they test for are diverse in dogs and cats than in people. The result is that there are a lot of untrue positives, and the test could indicate that your pet is allergic to things when he is really not.

    For this reason, veterinary dermatologists recommend intradermal skin testing.

    Intradermal Skin Testing – This test is considered the “gold standard” of allergy testing for atopy. The animal is sedated, and an area on his side is shaved in a patch below to the skin. A grid is laid out and little injections are made, done in order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the allergy causing antigen can be identified. A veterinary dermatologist specializes in these, and is the best person to read such tests. Before undergoing such testing, the pet needs to be off every medications, specifically steroids.

    The blood test and intradermal skin test own some similarities:

    1. Once the allergens are identified a mixture of these allergens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection – exposing the pet at first to just a little quantity, gradually increasing the dosage over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the allergens.
    2. These tests work best if performed during the season when the allergies are at their worst
    3. These tests work only for environmental allergens – although there is a blood test available for food allergy testing, results seem to be inconclusive at best.

      Most veterinary dermatologists consent that the best way to determine food allergies is to undertake a food trial.


    Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate to severe allergies. With appropriate testing, the hyposensitization injections own had excellent results in desensitizing your pet and reducing environmental allergy symptoms in numerous dogs.

    Veterinary dermatologist Dr. Gordon has found that with the appropriate desensitizing injections, one-third of treated patients improve to the point they are eventually capable to discontinue every therapy.

    Treatment

    There are numerous options for treating dogs with allergies.

    Until the cause of an allergy is pinpointed, it is hard to come up with the appropriate treatment. In the mean time, management practices love conducting a food trial and minimizing exposure to potential allergens can assist in reducing symptoms.

    Food Allergies

    A dog with food allergies requires no ‘treatment’, per se, owners just need to make certain their pet’s food does not contain the problem causing ingredient. Unfortunately, it can be a endless process to attempt and figure out what the offending ingredient is! A strict food trial is the best way to manage your pet’s food allergies.

    Environmental Allergies

    Without appropriate allergy testing, it is almost impossible to decipher what environmental component your pet is allergic to.

    You can attempt limiting your pet’s exposure to possible or known allergens by using avoidance.

    Avoidance

    Avoidance can be extremely useful in managing atopy. While it may be impossible to eliminate every of the offending allergens, numerous can be greatly reduced by managing their environment. Avoidance is rarely 100% effective when used by itself, but can greatly reduce allergy symptoms.

    Medications

    Veterinarian Prescribed

    For cases where exposure to the allergen cannot be controlled, such as in the case of a seasonal allergy, a veterinarian can prescribe your pet the correct dosage of an anti-histamine to assist alleviate symptoms.

    Anti-histamines assist control the immune system’s over-zealous response to an allergy, which then alleviates the symptoms. Steroids are also often prescribed by veterinarians to assist alleviate symptoms, but unfortunately they just mask the symptoms, not actually reduce the problem. They can also own serious side effects due to endless term use, and should always be used under the supervision of a veterinarian. Secondary infection is also common in allergy affected dogs, due to the pet itching and biting at their skin.

    Antibiotic treatment is often required to heal the resulting skin infection. Since bacterial and yeast skin infections are common in dogs with allergies, it is significant to treat these infections as well as the atopy. Consult with your veterinarian to discover the appropriate medications for your allergy prone pet.

    Over the Counter

    Not numerous over the counter oral medications are available to reduce itchiness in pets. However, Omega-3 fatty acids own been shown to be extremely beneficial in the management of allergies in dogs and cats. Fatty acids own been recommended for years to improve overall skin and jacket quality, and it is now known that they work in the skin to assist reduce the quantity and effects of histamine and other chemicals that are released in response to allergies.

    The quantity of success varies – some pets show little to no improvement, most show moderate improvement, and some seem to reply with a finish cure. Most pets need to be on the omega-3 fatty acids daily for several weeks to months to notice significant improvement. Omega-3 fatty acids are considered extremely safe and own extremely few side effects. It is significant to use a fatty acid supplement derived from fish body oil, as other types of fatty acids – love omega-6 fatty acids – can actually create an inflammatory response, making allergies worse.

    Topical Treatments

    The first step in topically managing a pet’s environmental allergies is to simply wash off the dog’s feet and underside after he comes in from the exterior.

    This will remove any allergens he came in contact with.

    Other topical therapy consists of shampoos, rinses, and topical anti-itch solutions. This type of management offers immediate but short-term relief. Numerous over the counter sprays contain ingredients such as topical anesthetics to lessen the severity of the itching, an antibiotic to prevent secondary infection, and a bittering agent to prevent constant chewing. It is often recommended to bathe atopic dogs every two weeks or so with a hypoallergenic or oatmeal shampoo. Weekly or even twice weekly baths may offer increased relief for some dogs.

    Topical sprays or solutions containing steroids such as hydrocortisone may offer additional relief.

    They are most appropriate when treating localized itching, and as they are used in moderation and are not readily absorbed into the bloodstream, do not create the long-term side effects associated with oral or injectable steroids. Consult with your veterinarian for treatment with any steroid containing products.

    Dealing With Allergies

    Trying to pinpoint the source of your pet’s allergies can be a time-consuming and frustrating experience. Using a combination of diagnostic tools, managing a food trial, and utilizing various treatment options, you can go a endless way to helping your dog live a more comfortable life.

    Still need help?

    PetPeople is greatful for the guidance and support of Dr.

    John Gordon, DVM, Dip. ACVD.

    CONTACT INFO:
    Dr. John Gordon, DVM, Dip. ACVD
    Board certified veterinary dermatologist
    Medical & Cancer Middle for Pets
    300 E. Wilson Bridge Rd.
    Worthington, OH 43085
    Phone: (614) 846-5800
    (800) 891-9010
    Fax: (614) 846-5803

    Find a Veterinary Dematologist near you.

    If your dog suffers seasonal allergies and you desire to use natural remedies instead of steroids or medications, there are several options available that can assist your pup.

    Seasonal allergies can cause sinus inflammation, sneezing, coughing, excessive mucous, runny eyes, yeast infections, and skin irritations love rashes and boiling spots.

    The natural remedies under can fight those symptoms while avoiding the potentially harmful side effects of numerous medications.

    Discuss them with your vet before you make any changes.

    Here are eight natural remedies for dogs that can assist fight symptoms of seasonal allergies.


    Quercetin

    Quercetin is a flavanoid, which is basically a compound in plants that gives fruits and veggies their colorful pigments.

    Quercetin has antioxidant, antihistamine, and anti-inflammatory properties. It helps fight cellular activity associated with inflammation, which reduces itching.

    It’s also used to treat asthma and respiratory issues because it reduces inflammation.

    Quercetin has cancer preventing qualities, as well.

    Supplements come in pill and capsule form. For the correct dosage in milligrams, take the weight of your dog, multiply by 1000mg, then divide by 125.

    You can purchase Quercetin here.


    Chickweed Gel

    Chickweed has anti-inflammatory properties that make it excellent for treating itches and boiling spots.

    Chickweed gel can be applied topically and has a pleasant, cooling effect that makes it excellent for use in boiling weather. It can also be used to treat minor bug bites, rashes, or eczema.


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