What causes allergy in nose

Allergic rhinitis is caused by the immune system reacting to an allergen as if it were harmful.

This results in cells releasing a number of chemicals that cause the inside layer of your nose (the mucous membrane) to become swollen and too much mucus to be produced.

Common allergens that cause allergic rhinitis include pollen (this type of allergic rhinitis is known as hay fever), as well as mould spores, home dust mites, and flakes of skin or droplets of urine or saliva from certain animals.

Find out more about the causes of allergic rhinitis


When to see a GP

Visit a GP if the symptoms of allergic rhinitis are disrupting your sleep, preventing you carrying out everyday activities, or adversely affecting your performance at work or school.

A diagnosis of allergic rhinitis will generally be based on your symptoms and any possible triggers you may own noticed.

If the cause of your condition is uncertain, you may be referred for allergy testing.

Find out more about diagnosing allergic rhinitis


Further problems

Allergic rhinitis can lead to complications in some cases.

What causes allergy in nose

These include:

  1. sinusitis – an infection caused by nasal inflammation and swelling that prevents mucus draining from the sinuses
  2. nasal polyps – abnormal but non-cancerous (benign) sacs of fluid that grow inside the nasal passages and sinuses
  3. middle ear infections – infection of part of the ear located directly behind the eardrum

These problems can often be treated with medication, although surgery is sometimes needed in severe or long-term cases.

Find out more about the complications of allergic rhinitis


Non-allergic rhinitis

Not every cases of rhinitis are caused by an allergic reaction.

Some cases are the result of:

  1. oversensitive blood vessels in the nose
  2. an infection, such as the common cold
  3. overuse of nasal decongestants

This type of rhinitis is known as non-allergic rhinitis.

Sheet final reviewed: 29 April 2019
Next review due: 29 April 2022

Fluticasone comes as a (prescription and nonprescription) liquid to spray in the nose.

What causes allergy in nose

When fluticasone nasal spray is used to relieve hay fever, and other allergy symptoms, or nonallergic rhinitis, it is generally sprayed in each nostril once daily. Alternatively, fluticasone nasal spray is sometimes sprayed in each nostril twice daily (in the morning and evening) at a lower dose as recommended by your doctor. When fluticasone nasal spray is used to treat nasal polyps, it is generally sprayed once or twice in each nostril twice daily.

What causes allergy in nose

If you are an adult, you will start your treatment with a higher dose of fluticasone nasal spray and then decrease your dose when your symptoms improve. If you are giving fluticasone nasal spray to a kid, you will start treatment with a lower dose of the medication and increase the dose if the child’s symptoms do not improve. Decrease the dose when the child’s symptoms improve.

What causes allergy in nose

Follow the directions on your prescription or product label carefully, and enquire your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use fluticasone exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than directed on the package label or prescribed by your doctor.

Fluticasone nasal spray is only for use in the nose.

What causes allergy in nose

Do not swallow the nasal spray and be careful not to spray it into your eyes or mouth.

Each bottle of fluticasone nasal spray should only be used by one person. Do not share fluticasone nasal spray because this may spread germs.

Fluticasone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever, allergies, nonallergic rhinitis, or nasal polyps, but does not cure these conditions. Fluticasone works best when used regularly.

What causes allergy in nose

Use fluticasone on a regular schedule unless your doctor has told you to use it as needed. Call your doctor if your symptoms get worse or do not improve after you use nonprescription fluticasone nasal spray daily for 1 week.

Fluticasone nasal spray is designed to provide a certain number of sprays. After the marked number of sprays has been used, the remaining sprays in the bottle might not contain the correct quantity of medication. You should hold track of the number of sprays you own used and dispose of the bottle after you own used the marked number of sprays even if it still contains some liquid.

Before you use fluticasone nasal spray for the first time, read the written directions that come with it.

Enquire your doctor or pharmacist if you own any questions about how to use the nasal spray.

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Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone. Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


Symptoms of allergic rhinitis

Allergic rhinitis typically causes cold-like symptoms, such as sneezing, itchiness and a blocked or runny nose.

These symptoms usually start soon after being exposed to an allergen.

Some people only get allergic rhinitis for a few months at a time because they’re sensitive to seasonal allergens, such as tree or grass pollen. Other people get allergic rhinitis every year round.

Most people with allergic rhinitis own mild symptoms that can be easily and effectively treated.

What causes allergy in nose

But for some people symptoms can be severe and persistent, causing sleep problems and interfering with everyday life.

The symptoms of allergic rhinitis occasionally improve with time, but this can take numerous years and it’s unlikely that the condition will vanish completely.


Treating and preventing allergic rhinitis

It’s hard to completely avoid potential allergens, but you can take steps to reduce exposure to a specific allergen you know or suspect is triggering your allergic rhinitis.

This will assist improve your symptoms.

If your condition is mild, you can also assist reduce the symptoms by taking over-the-counter medications, such as non-sedating antihistamines, and by regularly rinsing your nasal passages with a salt water solution to hold your nose free of irritants.

See a GP for advice if you own tried taking these steps and they own not helped.

They may prescribe a stronger medication, such as a nasal spray containing corticosteroids.


What’s your allergy?

Birch: Second week of March to first week of June (peaks final week of March to mid-May).

Plane: Mid-March to mid-May (peaks final week of April to second week in May).

Oilseed rape: Last week in March to mid-July (peaks mid-May to finish of June).

Oak: First week of April to mid-June (peaks finish of April to first week in June).

Grass: First week of May to second week of September (peaks first week in June to final week in July).

Nettle: Beginning of May to finish of September (peaks final week of June to first week in August).

Mould: Early autumn and tardy spring.

Symptoms are worse inside than outside.

Dust: All year, but especially notable in winter when the central heating is turned on. Symptoms are worse indoors.

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What causes allergy in nose

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Allergic rhinitis is inflammation of the inside of the nose caused by an allergen, such as pollen, dust, mould or flakes of skin from certain animals.

It’s a extremely common condition, estimated to affect around 1 in every 5 people in the UK.


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