What causes allergies in august and september

Well, it’s technically *always* allergy season due to year-round offenders such as dust mites, mold, and pet dander, says Purvi Parikh, MD, an allergist and immunologist with Allergy & Asthma Network. But some allergens–pollens, specifically—are seasonal.

Jewelyn Butron

Tree pollen, for example, pops up in the spring (generally in tardy March to April), grass pollen arrives in the tardy spring (around May), weed pollen is most prevalent in the summer (July to August), and ragweed pollen takes over from summer to drop (late August to the first frost), says Dr.

Parikh.

And even worse news: Climate change means allergy season begins earlier and lasts longer, adds Corinne Keet, MD, PhD, a professor and allergist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

To get super-specific, Pollen.com has a National Allergy Map that provides an up-to-date allergy forecast in diverse areas around the country and an Allergy Alert app that gives five-day forecasts with in-depth info on specific allergens, helping you decide if you should stay indoors that day.

Certain areas own also seen a particularly large increase in pollen during allergy season. In 2019, the New York Times reported on the extreme blankets of pollen that hit North Carolina; Georgia and Chicago also faced especially aggressive allergy seasons too.

In Alaska, temperatures are rising so quickly (as in numerous other far northern countries), that the pollen count and season duration are seeing unprecedented growth.


Ragweed Allergy Treatment

  • Remove your shoes. Kick your shoes off before entering your home to avoid tracking ragweed and other pollens inside.
  • Stay one step ahead of ragweed.ZYRTEC® ALLERGYCAST® app shows you what pollen is in the air with the daily pollen forecast and you can track your allergy symptoms, too.

    Standard data rates for your plan apply.

  • Cover up. When exterior, wear hats, gloves, glasses, paper masks and long-sleeve shirts to prevent contact with ragweed and other pollens.
  • Take a shower. After endless periods outdoors, showering will assist remove ragweed and other pollens from your skin and hair.
  • Try an antihistamine. ZYRTEC® is a common antihistamine that helps relieve your worst ragweed allergy symptoms. It starts working at hour 1 and stays strong day after day. Study more about the ZYRTEC® family of products.

There’s no contesting that allergy season is annoying AF.

You’re supposed to *finally* be running exterior again or picnicking in the park, but instead, you’re stuck inside trying (key word) to breathe through snot and see through watery, itchy eyes.

And if it feels love your allergies own gotten worse the final few years, you’re not incorrect. After a consistent increase in the intensity and length of allergy season over the final several years (you can blame climate change), allergy season 2020 will likely be worse than usual or potentially the most intense and longest yet if the trend continues. Whomp, whomp.

Allergy symptoms—those watery eyes and stuffy nose, along with sneezing fits, coughing, wheezing, and hive- or eczema-like rashes—happen when your immune system essentially freaks out over an otherwise harmless substance (like pollen).

Delightful, huh?

But even if the above symptoms sound every too familiar, there is excellent news: You can fight back against allergies—and the sooner you get started the better. That means knowing when exactly allergy season will start this year, and how to prep your body for any allergen invaders.

There’s no contesting that allergy season is annoying AF. You’re supposed to *finally* be running exterior again or picnicking in the park, but instead, you’re stuck inside trying (key word) to breathe through snot and see through watery, itchy eyes.

And if it feels love your allergies own gotten worse the final few years, you’re not incorrect. After a consistent increase in the intensity and length of allergy season over the final several years (you can blame climate change), allergy season 2020 will likely be worse than usual or potentially the most intense and longest yet if the trend continues. Whomp, whomp.

Allergy symptoms—those watery eyes and stuffy nose, along with sneezing fits, coughing, wheezing, and hive- or eczema-like rashes—happen when your immune system essentially freaks out over an otherwise harmless substance (like pollen).

Delightful, huh?

What causes allergies in august and september

But even if the above symptoms sound every too familiar, there is excellent news: You can fight back against allergies—and the sooner you get started the better. That means knowing when exactly allergy season will start this year, and how to prep your body for any allergen invaders.


Ragweed Allergy Symptoms

The most common ragweed allergy symptom is a stuffy or runny nose, but you also might experience sneezing, itchy eyes, watery eyes and other common allergy symptoms.


What can I do if my allergy meds aren’t working…or my allergies are getting worse?

If you’re already taking OTC allergy meds (and, you know, keeping your windows closed and washing your face and hair after coming inside), allergy shots, a.k.a.

allergen immunotherapy, make your immune system less reactive to allergens (read: pollen), and for some people, they can even induce a cure, says Dr. Parikh.

“By giving little increasing doses of what you are allergic to, you train the immune system to slowly stop being as allergic,” she says. “This is the best way to address allergies, as it targets the underlying problem and builds your immunity to a specific allergen.”

The downside?

Allergy shots are a bit of a time commitment. You’ll need to get them once a week for six to eight months, then once a month for a minimum of two years, says Dr. Parikh. You need to be a little bit patient, too, because it can take about six months to start feeling better (so if you desire protection by March, you’ll probably own to start in September the year before). But a life without allergies? Sounds worth it to me.

Cassie ShortsleeveFreelance WriterCassie Shortsleeve is a skilled freelance author and editor with almost a decade of experience reporting on every things health, fitness, and travel.

Kristin CanningKristin Canning is the health editor at Women’s Health, where she assigns, edits and reports stories on emerging health research and technology, women’s health conditions, psychology, mental health, wellness entrepreneurs, and the intersection of health and culture for both print and digital.

Tree pollen occurs first, typically from tardy March to mid-May, and affects around 25% of people.

Most people are allergic to grass pollen (which actually has two peaks) and the season lasts from mid-May until July. Weed pollen can be released at any time but the season typically covers the finish of June to September.

However, dependent upon where you live in the UK, the hay fever season will start at diverse times. For example, there’s a later start and shorter season in the north of the UK, where generally there is less pollen. Urban areas own lower counts than the countryside, and places inland own higher counts than around the coast.

If we glance at grass pollen, the peak across England and Wales, for example, generally starts in the first two weeks of June.

There are two peaks though, with the second, lower peak occurring in the first two weeks of July, after which things tail off slowly.

These peaks may be masked by how wet, dry, warm or freezing it is, and the timing of the peaks extremely much depends on the weather during spring and early summer.

There are also loads of factors that change the start date of the pollen season. Low temperatures in winter will hold plants and trees dormant for longer into the new year. Essentially, the lower the temperature the less pollen is produced, but, this can change if soil and air temperatures in spring are higher than normal.

Spring rainfall is also key, as a dry season reduces the quantity of pollen production. Regardless of the weather, pollen is also dependent on how hardy diverse species are and how well they manage with a mixture of diverse types in one region.


What does that mean for my allergy meds?

What causes allergies in august and september

When should I start taking them?

There’s no point in waiting until you’re miserable to take allergy meds, especially if you desire to hold up your outdoor workouts.

In fact, allergists recommend you start taking meds a couple weeks before allergy season arrives, or, at the latest, take them the moment you start having symptoms, says Dr. Parikh. Taking them early can stop an immune system freak-out before it happens, lessening the severity of symptoms, he adds.

What causes allergies in august and september

Check out the National Allergy Map to figure out when to start taking meds depending on where you live.

As for which allergy meds to take, if you’re seriously stuffed, start with steroid nasal sprays such as Flonase or Rhinocort, which reduce inflammation-induced stuffiness, says Dr. Keet. And if you’ve got itching, sneezing, and a runny nose, too, glance for non-sedating antihistamines such as Zyrtec, Xyzal, or Allegra, she adds. Just remember: While OTC allergy meds suppress symptoms, they don’t cure the problem, so they may be less effective if your allergies are worsening, notes Dr.

Parikh.


What will climate change do to pollen patterns in the UK?

It’s likely a changing climate will impact pollen patterns in at least three ways:

  • It’s possible that climate change will lead to changes in the potency of pollen – a single pollen particle can own varying amounts of the allergy-causing agent on it.
  • A changing climate will mean that changes in temperature and rainfall may lengthen the UK pollen season and potentially make pollen concentrations higher.
  • The UK is also facing a threat from changes in the geographical distribution of allergenic plants, due to climate change, with invasive species such as ambrosia (common ragweed) being on the watch list.

    A single ragweed plant can produce a billion grains of pollen per season and its pollen causes strong allergic reactions.

Related pages

Download the Met Office Weather App to hold up to date with pollen levels

(ARA) As most allergy sufferers will tell you, allergy symptoms can always be bothersome, turning any time of year into sneezing season. A runny nose, itchy eyes and scratchy throat can arise as the days get shorter and the leaves start to change.

The drop can be especially hard for people who are sensitive to mold and ragweed pollen.But these seasonal elements aren t the only triggers that can make symptoms worse this time of year. There are also a few lesser known triggers.Here are four things you might not know about drop allergies, courtesy of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:

* Hay Fever? — Hay fever, a term from a bygone era, actually has nothing to do with hay.

Instead, it s a general term used to describe the symptoms of tardy summer allergies. Ragweed is a common cause of hay fever, which is also known as allergic rhinitis. The plant generally begins to pollenate in mid-August and may continue to be a problem until a hard freeze, depending on where you live. See an allergist for prescription medications to control symptoms or to see if allergy shots may be your best option.

* Lingering Warm Weather While most people enjoy Indian summer, unseasonably warm temperatures can make rhinitis symptoms final longer. Mold spores can also be released when humidity is high, or the weather is dry and windy.

Be certain to start taking medications before your symptoms start.

What causes allergies in august and september

Track your allergy symptoms with MyNasalAllergyJournal.org and visit with your allergist to discover relief.

* Pesky Leaves — Some folks might discover it hard to hold up with raking leaves throughout the autumn. But for allergy sufferers, raking presents its own problem. It can stir agitating pollen and mold into the air, causing allergy and asthma symptoms. Those with allergies should wear an NIOSH rated N95mask when raking leaves, mowing the lawn and gardening.

* School Allergens — It s not only seasonal pollen and mold that triggers allergies this time of year.

Kids are often exposed to classroom irritants and allergy triggers.These can include chalk dust and classroom pets. Students with food allergies may also be exposed to allergens in the lunch room.Kids with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) may experience attacks during recess or gym class. Assist your kid understand what can trigger their allergies and asthma, and how they can avoid symptoms. Be certain to notify teachers and the school nurse of any emergency medications, such as quick relief inhalers and epinephrine.

No matter the season, it s significant for those who ponder they may be suffering from allergies or asthma to see a board-certified allergist.

What causes allergies in august and september

An allergist can assist you develop a treatment plan, which caninclude both medication and avoidance techniques.

Having your allergies properly identified and treated will assist you and your family enjoy the season. To discover an allergist and study more about allergies and asthma, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org.

Related pages

Download the Met Office Weather App to hold up to date with pollen levels

(ARA) As most allergy sufferers will tell you, allergy symptoms can always be bothersome, turning any time of year into sneezing season.

A runny nose, itchy eyes and scratchy throat can arise as the days get shorter and the leaves start to change.

The drop can be especially hard for people who are sensitive to mold and ragweed pollen.But these seasonal elements aren t the only triggers that can make symptoms worse this time of year. There are also a few lesser known triggers.Here are four things you might not know about drop allergies, courtesy of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:

* Hay Fever? — Hay fever, a term from a bygone era, actually has nothing to do with hay. Instead, it s a general term used to describe the symptoms of tardy summer allergies.

Ragweed is a common cause of hay fever, which is also known as allergic rhinitis. The plant generally begins to pollenate in mid-August and may continue to be a problem until a hard freeze, depending on where you live. See an allergist for prescription medications to control symptoms or to see if allergy shots may be your best option.

* Lingering Warm Weather While most people enjoy Indian summer, unseasonably warm temperatures can make rhinitis symptoms final longer.

Mold spores can also be released when humidity is high, or the weather is dry and windy. Be certain to start taking medications before your symptoms start. Track your allergy symptoms with MyNasalAllergyJournal.org and visit with your allergist to discover relief.

* Pesky Leaves — Some folks might discover it hard to hold up with raking leaves throughout the autumn. But for allergy sufferers, raking presents its own problem. It can stir agitating pollen and mold into the air, causing allergy and asthma symptoms. Those with allergies should wear an NIOSH rated N95mask when raking leaves, mowing the lawn and gardening.

* School Allergens — It s not only seasonal pollen and mold that triggers allergies this time of year. Kids are often exposed to classroom irritants and allergy triggers.These can include chalk dust and classroom pets. Students with food allergies may also be exposed to allergens in the lunch room.Kids with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) may experience attacks during recess or gym class. Assist your kid understand what can trigger their allergies and asthma, and how they can avoid symptoms. Be certain to notify teachers and the school nurse of any emergency medications, such as quick relief inhalers and epinephrine.

No matter the season, it s significant for those who ponder they may be suffering from allergies or asthma to see a board-certified allergist. An allergist can assist you develop a treatment plan, which caninclude both medication and avoidance techniques.

Having your allergies properly identified and treated will assist you and your family enjoy the season. To discover an allergist and study more about allergies and asthma, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org.



While hay fever and allergies caused by trees are generally associated with springtime, seasonal allergies can also spike during the early drop months.

Cool autumn air harbors irritants that can be just as unpleasant as pollen.

Allergens from trees and grasses float through the air in spring, summer and drop, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These particles can enter a person’s nose, eyes, ears and mouth, triggering an allergic reaction.

«The most common drop allergy is ragweed, which pollinates from August 15 to early October through most of the United States and parts of Europe,» said Dr. Jay M. Portnoy, chief of allergy, asthma and immunology at Children’s Mercy Hospitals & Clinics in Kansas City, Mich.

«It causes hayfever, with symptoms that include sneezing, runny nose, stuffy nose, itchy nose and itchy, watery eyes.»

Mold spores are also released in autumn, and become more common in the air as decaying leaves and other vegetation drop to the ground, Portnoy said.

What causes allergies in august and september

This worsens allergy symptoms because as mold particle counts climb higher, they become increasingly irritating to people with allergies. High mold counts also contribute to breathing problems among those with asthma, Portnoy said.

«Sadly, drop is also virus season, with increased colds and the flu,» Portnoy told Life’s Little Mysteries. «Since every of these are happening at the same time, it is often hard to tell what is due to allergies and what is due to infection.»

Attempting to escape drop allergens by staying indoors probably won’t work, Portnoy said, because low humidity inside homes is another major trigger of nasal and lung allergy symptoms.

Low humidity dries out mucous membranes and leads to inflammation, while freezing, dry air causes the lining of the nose to become swollen, resulting in a stuffy and runny nose.

While the ideal indoor humidity is from 35 to 50 percent, homes and offices may own a humidity level as low as 16 percent. Portnoy advises using a humidity meter, also known as a hygrometer, to hold track of the humidity levels. If levels are low, a humidifier may assist relieve nasal problems.

Changing vent filters and servicing heating systems can also ease symptoms.

Vacuuming and cleaning the home often to hold dust mites, pet dander or other indoor allergy triggers under control may assist alleviate discomfort, according to the NIH.

But there’s still some excellent news for those suffering from autumn allergies.

«Many people get better once the weather turns colder and stops fluctuating from warm and cold,» Portnoy said. «By November, it often gets better.»

This article was provided by Life’s Little Mysteries, a sister site to LiveScience.

What Is Ragweed?

Ragweed is a member of the daisy family and has tiny yellow-green flowers that produce vast amounts of pollen – about a million grains per plant, every single day.

When Does Ragweed Bloom?

Ragweed grows from August to November, peaking mid-September and ending with the first frost.

However, if you get allergies from ragweed, you might own noticed your symptoms are lasting longer every year.

Where Does Ragweed Grow?

Ragweed is found in fields, gardens, roadsides and waste areas every over the U.S., but it is the biggest problem in the East and Midwest.

How Does Ragweed Pollen Move?

Ragweed pollen grains are so light that they can travel up to 400 miles in the wind. This means that when it comes to ragweed spreading across the country, the sky’s the limit.

Why Does Ragweed Pollen Cause Allergic Reactions?

People with allergies might own more sensitive immune systems that fight allergens, thinking they’re harmful foreign substances, such as viruses or bacteria.

What causes allergies in august and september

When you own a ragweed allergy and breathe in the pollen, your body defends itself against the invader (even though it might be harmless), and the reaction leads to allergy symptoms.


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