What causes allergies at night

Allergic rhinitis can lead to complications in some cases.

These include:

  1. sinusitis – an infection caused by nasal inflammation and swelling that prevents mucus draining from the sinuses
  2. nasal polyps – abnormal but non-cancerous (benign) sacs of fluid that grow inside the nasal passages and sinuses
  3. middle ear infections – infection of part of the ear located directly behind the eardrum

These problems can often be treated with medication, although surgery is sometimes needed in severe or long-term cases.

Find out more about the complications of allergic rhinitis


Non-allergic rhinitis

Not every cases of rhinitis are caused by an allergic reaction.

Some cases are the result of:

  1. oversensitive blood vessels in the nose
  2. an infection, such as the common cold
  3. overuse of nasal decongestants

This type of rhinitis is known as non-allergic rhinitis.

Sheet final reviewed: 29 April 2019
Next review due: 29 April 2022

Allergic rhinitis occurs when allergens in the air are breathed by a patient that is allergic to them, irritating and inflaming the nasal passages. Allergens may include dust mites, pollen, molds, or pet dander. In people who are allergic to them, these particles trigger the release of a chemical in the body that causes nasal congestion, sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose.

These symptoms can lead to poor sleep, which can result in significant daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

Allergic rhinitis (allergies) may happen year-round or seasonally. When it occurs seasonally it is generally caused by airborne particles from trees, grass, ragweed, or outdoor mold. Causes of year-round allergic rhinitis include indoor substances such as pet dander, indoor mold, cockroach and dust mites in bedding, mattresses, and carpeting.

Sleep problems are common in people with allergic rhinitis.

What causes allergies at night

One study found that sleep is dramatically impaired by allergic symptoms and that the degree of impairment is related to the severity of those symptoms. In addition, sleep problems are linked with fatigue and daytime sleepiness as well as decreased productivity at work or school, impaired learning and memory, depression, and a reduced quality of life.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a sleep disorder in which breathing is briefly and repeatedly interrupted during sleep, is linked with allergic rhinitis. OSA occurs when the muscles of the throat relax and fail to hold the airway open during sleep.

People with OSA may suffer from severe daytime sleepiness and a range of chronic health problems such as heart disease, stroke, and sexual dysfunction. Nasal congestion, which causes the upper airway to narrow, increases the risk of both snoring and OSA among allergic rhinitis patients. The excellent news is that reducing nasal inflammation may reduce symptoms of snoring and OSA as well as daytime fatigue and sleepiness, according to at least one study.

What causes allergies at night

This is particularly significant for those OSA patients who own trouble with continuous positive airway pressure(CPAP) devices because of nasal congestion.

In addition, research suggests that allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for snoring and OSA among children. Snoring and other sleep problems are linked with poor performance in school, lower IQ, and even brain damage, according to recent research. Parents are urged to pay shut attention to sleep symptoms in children with allergic rhinitis and discuss their children’s sleep with their pediatricians.

With such a high rate of sleep disorders and other health problems among allergic rhinitis patients, getting adequate sleep on a regular basis is essential to maintaining physical and mental health as well as performance, safety, and overall well-being.

According to NSF’s 2006 Sleep in America poll, 15% of American adolescents take medications for allergies.

Additional Info:

Reviewed by David G.

Davila, MD (December 2009).

Anaphylaxis: Severe Allergic Reactions


Nearly one in 50 Americans are at risk for anaphylaxis

Some children are allergic to certain foods, medicines, insects and latex. When they come into contact with these things they develop symptoms, such as hives and shortness of breath. This is known as an allergic reaction. Things that cause an allergic reaction are called allergens. Take every allergic symptoms seriously because both mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis).

Diagnosis

Seasonal allergies are fairly simple to identify because the pattern of symptoms returns from year to year following exposure to an allergen.

Talk with your doctor if you ponder your kid might own allergies.

The doctor will enquire about symptoms and when they appear and, based on the answers and a physical exam, should be capable to make a diagnosis. If not, the doctor may refer you to an allergist for blood tests or allergy skin tests.

To discover an allergy’s cause, allergists generally do skin tests in one of two ways:

  • A drop of a purified liquid form of the allergen is dropped onto the skin and the area is pricked with a little pricking device.If a kid reacts to the allergen, the skin will swell a little in that area.
  • A little quantity of allergen is injected just under the skin.

    What causes allergies at night

    This test stings a little but isn’t extremely painful. After about 15 minutes, if a lump surrounded by a reddish area appears (like a mosquito bite) at the injection site, the test is positive.

Even if a skin test or a blood test shows an allergy, a kid must also own symptoms to be definitively diagnosed with an allergy. For example, a kid who has a positive test for grass pollen and sneezes a lot while playing in the grass would be considered allergic to grass pollen.

Take Steps to Avoid Anaphylaxis

The best way to avoid anaphylaxis is for your kid to stay away from allergens.

Teach your kid about his or her allergy in an age-appropriate way. Teach your kid to tell an adult about a reaction, how to avoid allergens and how and when to use an epinephrine auto-injector.

What causes allergies at night

Here are some first steps you can take for each type of allergy:

Food. Learn how to read food labels and avoid cross-contact. Read the label every time you purchase a product, even if you’ve used it before. Ingredients in any given product may change.

Insect allergies. Wear closed-toe shoes and insect repellent when outdoors. Avoid loose-fitting clothing that can trap an insect between the clothing and the skin.

Medicine allergies. Tell your doctor about medicines your kid is allergic to.

Know both the generic and brand names of the medicines.

Latex allergies. Tell your doctors, dentists and other health care providers about your child’s latex allergy. Enquire them to put a note in your child’s medical chart about your child’s allergy. Also remind them of the allergy before any medical procedure or test.

For every allergies:  Educate family, friends, the school and others who will be with your kid about your child’s allergies. They can assist your kid avoid allergens and help if anaphylaxis occurs.

Reviewed by medical advisors June 2014.

Know How to Treat Anaphylaxis

Even if a skin test or a blood test shows an allergy, a kid must also own symptoms to be definitively diagnosed with an allergy.

For example, a kid who has a positive test for grass pollen and sneezes a lot while playing in the grass would be considered allergic to grass pollen.

Take Steps to Avoid Anaphylaxis

The best way to avoid anaphylaxis is for your kid to stay away from allergens. Teach your kid about his or her allergy in an age-appropriate way. Teach your kid to tell an adult about a reaction, how to avoid allergens and how and when to use an epinephrine auto-injector. Here are some first steps you can take for each type of allergy:

Food. Learn how to read food labels and avoid cross-contact. Read the label every time you purchase a product, even if you’ve used it before.

Ingredients in any given product may change.

Insect allergies. Wear closed-toe shoes and insect repellent when outdoors. Avoid loose-fitting clothing that can trap an insect between the clothing and the skin.

Medicine allergies. Tell your doctor about medicines your kid is allergic to. Know both the generic and brand names of the medicines.

Latex allergies. Tell your doctors, dentists and other health care providers about your child’s latex allergy. Enquire them to put a note in your child’s medical chart about your child’s allergy.

Also remind them of the allergy before any medical procedure or test.

For every allergies:  Educate family, friends, the school and others who will be with your kid about your child’s allergies. They can assist your kid avoid allergens and help if anaphylaxis occurs.

Reviewed by medical advisors June 2014.

Know How to Treat Anaphylaxis

  • sneezing
  • Skin rashes and itching and hives
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Stomach pain, vomiting or diarrhea
  • Follow the steps in your child’s emergency care plan to give your kid epinephrine correct away.

    This can save your child’s life.

  • Sometimes, a reaction is followed by a second, more severe, reaction known as a biphasic reaction. This second reaction can happen within 4 to 8 hours of the first reaction or even later. That’s why people should be watched in the emergency room for several hours after anaphylaxis.
  • Make a follow up appointment or an appointment with an allergy specialist to further diagnose and treat the allergy.
  • After giving epinephrine, always call 911 or a local ambulance service. Tell them that your kid is having a serious allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine.
  • Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing (whistling sound during breathing)
  • Your kid needs to be taken to a hospital by ambulance. Medical staff will watch your kid closely for further reactions and treat him or her if needed.

  • Feeling love something terrible is about to happen
  • Dizziness and/or fainting
  • nasal congestion
  • itchy nose and/or throat
  • clear, runny nose
  • coughing

en españolAlergia estacional (fiebre del heno)

After Anaphylaxis

  1. Sometimes, a reaction is followed by a second, more severe, reaction known as a biphasic reaction. This second reaction can happen within 4 to 8 hours of the first reaction or even later. That’s why people should be watched in the emergency room for several hours after anaphylaxis.
  2. Make a follow up appointment or an appointment with an allergy specialist to further diagnose and treat the allergy.

Common Causes of Anaphylaxis

Foods.

The most common food allergies are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish. The most common food allergies in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

Insect stings from bees, wasps, yellow jackets and fire ants.

Latex found in things such as balloons, rubber bands, hospital gloves.

Medicines, especially penicillin, sulfa drugs, insulin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen.

Be Aware of Symptoms of Anaphylaxis

The symptoms of anaphylaxis may happen shortly after having contact with an allergen and can get worse quickly.

You can’t predict how your kid will react to a certain allergen from one time to the next. Both the types of symptoms and how serious they are can change. So, it’s significant for you to be prepared for every allergic reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis generally involve more than one part of the body such as the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut, and brain. Some symptoms include:

  1. Stomach pain, vomiting or diarrhea
  2. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing (whistling sound during breathing)
  3. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  4. Skin rashes and itching and hives
  5. Dizziness and/or fainting
  6. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Your child’s doctor will give you a finish list of symptoms.

Be Prepared for Anaphylaxis

Keep an Emergency Plan with You

You, your kid, and others who supervise or care for your kid need to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and how to treat it.

Your child’s doctor will give you a written step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency. The plan is called an allergy emergency care plan or anaphylaxis emergency action plan. To be prepared, you, your kid, and others who care for your kid need to own copies of this plan.

About Epinephrine

Epinephrine is the medicine used to treat anaphylaxis. The emergency action plan tells you when and how to give epinephrine. You cannot rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis.

Know How to Use Epinephrine

Learn how to give your kid epinephrine.

Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. When you press it against your child’s outer thigh, it injects a single dose of medicine. Your child’s health care team will show you how to use it.

What causes allergies at night

You, in turn, can teach people who spend time with your kid how to use it.

Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near your kid. Do not store epinephrine in your car or other places where it will get too boiling or too freezing. Discard if the liquid is not clear, and replace it when it expires.

About Seasonal Allergies

«Achoo!» It’s your son’s third sneezing fit of the morning, and as you hand him another tissue you wonder if these cold-like symptoms — the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose — own something to do with the recent weather change.

If he gets similar symptoms at the same time every year, you’re likely right: seasonal allergies are at work.

Seasonal allergies, sometimes called «hay fever» or seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that happen during certain times of the year, generally when outdoor molds release their spores, and trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny pollen particles into the air to fertilize other plants.

The immune systems of people who are allergic to mold spores or pollen treat these particles (called allergens) as invaders and release chemicals, including histamine, into the bloodstream to defend against them.

It’s the release of these chemicals that causes allergy symptoms.

People can be allergic to one or more types of pollen or mold. The type someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen. For example, in the mid-Atlantic states, tree pollination is February through May, grass pollen runs from May through June, and weed pollen is from August through October — so kids with these allergies are likely to own increased symptoms at those times. Mold spores tend to peak midsummer through the drop, depending on location.

Even kids who own never had seasonal allergies in years past can develop them.

Seasonal allergies can start at almost any age, though they generally develop by the time someone is 10 years ancient and reach their peak in the early twenties, with symptoms often disappearing later in adulthood.

Signs and Symptoms

If your kid develops a «cold» at the same time every year, seasonal allergies might be to blame. Allergy symptoms, which generally come on suddenly and final as endless as a person is exposed to the allergen, can include:

  1. clear, runny nose
  2. itchy nose and/or throat
  3. nasal congestion
  4. sneezing
  5. coughing

These symptoms often come with itchy, watery, and/or red eyes, which is called allergic conjunctivitis.

Kids who own wheezing and shortness of breath in addition to these symptoms might own allergies that triggerasthma.

Treatment

There are numerous ways to treat seasonal allergies, depending on how severe the symptoms are. The most significant part of treatment is knowing what allergens are at work. Some kids can get relief by reducing or eliminating exposure to allergens that annoy them.

If certain seasons cause symptoms, hold the windows closed, use air conditioning if possible, and stay indoors when pollen/mold/weed counts are high.It’s also a excellent thought for kids with seasonal allergies to wash their hands or shower and change clothing after playing outside.

If reducing exposure isn’t possible or is ineffective, medicines can assist ease allergy symptoms.

These may include decongestants, antihistamines, and nasal spray steroids. If symptoms can’t be managed with medicines, the doctor may recommend taking your kid to an allergist or immunologist for evaluation for allergy shots (immunotherapy), which can assist desensitize kids to specific allergens.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop. Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr.

Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition. More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN). Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states.

Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S. [Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]

en españolAlergia estacional (fiebre del heno)

After Anaphylaxis

  1. Sometimes, a reaction is followed by a second, more severe, reaction known as a biphasic reaction. This second reaction can happen within 4 to 8 hours of the first reaction or even later.

    That’s why people should be watched in the emergency room for several hours after anaphylaxis.

  2. Make a follow up appointment or an appointment with an allergy specialist to further diagnose and treat the allergy.

Common Causes of Anaphylaxis

Foods. The most common food allergies are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish. The most common food allergies in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

Insect stings from bees, wasps, yellow jackets and fire ants.

Latex found in things such as balloons, rubber bands, hospital gloves.

Medicines, especially penicillin, sulfa drugs, insulin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen.

Be Aware of Symptoms of Anaphylaxis

The symptoms of anaphylaxis may happen shortly after having contact with an allergen and can get worse quickly.

You can’t predict how your kid will react to a certain allergen from one time to the next. Both the types of symptoms and how serious they are can change. So, it’s significant for you to be prepared for every allergic reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis generally involve more than one part of the body such as the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut, and brain.

Some symptoms include:

  1. Stomach pain, vomiting or diarrhea
  2. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing (whistling sound during breathing)
  3. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  4. Skin rashes and itching and hives
  5. Dizziness and/or fainting
  6. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Your child’s doctor will give you a finish list of symptoms.

Be Prepared for Anaphylaxis

Keep an Emergency Plan with You

You, your kid, and others who supervise or care for your kid need to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and how to treat it.

Your child’s doctor will give you a written step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency. The plan is called an allergy emergency care plan or anaphylaxis emergency action plan. To be prepared, you, your kid, and others who care for your kid need to own copies of this plan.

About Epinephrine

Epinephrine is the medicine used to treat anaphylaxis. The emergency action plan tells you when and how to give epinephrine. You cannot rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis.

Know How to Use Epinephrine

Learn how to give your kid epinephrine. Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector.

When you press it against your child’s outer thigh, it injects a single dose of medicine. Your child’s health care team will show you how to use it. You, in turn, can teach people who spend time with your kid how to use it.

Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near your kid. Do not store epinephrine in your car or other places where it will get too boiling or too freezing. Discard if the liquid is not clear, and replace it when it expires.

About Seasonal Allergies

«Achoo!» It’s your son’s third sneezing fit of the morning, and as you hand him another tissue you wonder if these cold-like symptoms — the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose — own something to do with the recent weather change.

If he gets similar symptoms at the same time every year, you’re likely right: seasonal allergies are at work.

Seasonal allergies, sometimes called «hay fever» or seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that happen during certain times of the year, generally when outdoor molds release their spores, and trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny pollen particles into the air to fertilize other plants.

The immune systems of people who are allergic to mold spores or pollen treat these particles (called allergens) as invaders and release chemicals, including histamine, into the bloodstream to defend against them.

It’s the release of these chemicals that causes allergy symptoms.

People can be allergic to one or more types of pollen or mold. The type someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen. For example, in the mid-Atlantic states, tree pollination is February through May, grass pollen runs from May through June, and weed pollen is from August through October — so kids with these allergies are likely to own increased symptoms at those times.

Mold spores tend to peak midsummer through the drop, depending on location.

Even kids who own never had seasonal allergies in years past can develop them. Seasonal allergies can start at almost any age, though they generally develop by the time someone is 10 years ancient and reach their peak in the early twenties, with symptoms often disappearing later in adulthood.

Signs and Symptoms

If your kid develops a «cold» at the same time every year, seasonal allergies might be to blame. Allergy symptoms, which generally come on suddenly and final as endless as a person is exposed to the allergen, can include:

  1. clear, runny nose
  2. itchy nose and/or throat
  3. nasal congestion
  4. sneezing
  5. coughing

These symptoms often come with itchy, watery, and/or red eyes, which is called allergic conjunctivitis.

Kids who own wheezing and shortness of breath in addition to these symptoms might own allergies that triggerasthma.

Treatment

There are numerous ways to treat seasonal allergies, depending on how severe the symptoms are. The most significant part of treatment is knowing what allergens are at work. Some kids can get relief by reducing or eliminating exposure to allergens that annoy them.

If certain seasons cause symptoms, hold the windows closed, use air conditioning if possible, and stay indoors when pollen/mold/weed counts are high.It’s also a excellent thought for kids with seasonal allergies to wash their hands or shower and change clothing after playing outside.

If reducing exposure isn’t possible or is ineffective, medicines can assist ease allergy symptoms.

These may include decongestants, antihistamines, and nasal spray steroids. If symptoms can’t be managed with medicines, the doctor may recommend taking your kid to an allergist or immunologist for evaluation for allergy shots (immunotherapy), which can assist desensitize kids to specific allergens.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop.

Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition.

What causes allergies at night

More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN).

Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states. Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S.

[Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]


Treating and preventing allergic rhinitis

It’s hard to completely avoid potential allergens, but you can take steps to reduce exposure to a specific allergen you know or suspect is triggering your allergic rhinitis. This will assist improve your symptoms.

If your condition is mild, you can also assist reduce the symptoms by taking over-the-counter medications, such as non-sedating antihistamines, and by regularly rinsing your nasal passages with a salt water solution to hold your nose free of irritants.

See a GP for advice if you own tried taking these steps and they own not helped.

They may prescribe a stronger medication, such as a nasal spray containing corticosteroids.


What causes allergic rhinitis

Allergic rhinitis is caused by the immune system reacting to an allergen as if it were harmful.

This results in cells releasing a number of chemicals that cause the inside layer of your nose (the mucous membrane) to become swollen and too much mucus to be produced.

Common allergens that cause allergic rhinitis include pollen (this type of allergic rhinitis is known as hay fever), as well as mould spores, home dust mites, and flakes of skin or droplets of urine or saliva from certain animals.

Find out more about the causes of allergic rhinitis


When to see a GP

Visit a GP if the symptoms of allergic rhinitis are disrupting your sleep, preventing you carrying out everyday activities, or adversely affecting your performance at work or school.

A diagnosis of allergic rhinitis will generally be based on your symptoms and any possible triggers you may own noticed.

If the cause of your condition is uncertain, you may be referred for allergy testing.

Find out more about diagnosing allergic rhinitis


Symptoms of allergic rhinitis

Allergic rhinitis typically causes cold-like symptoms, such as sneezing, itchiness and a blocked or runny nose.

These symptoms usually start soon after being exposed to an allergen.

Some people only get allergic rhinitis for a few months at a time because they’re sensitive to seasonal allergens, such as tree or grass pollen.

Other people get allergic rhinitis every year round.

Most people with allergic rhinitis own mild symptoms that can be easily and effectively treated.

But for some people symptoms can be severe and persistent, causing sleep problems and interfering with everyday life.

The symptoms of allergic rhinitis occasionally improve with time, but this can take numerous years and it’s unlikely that the condition will vanish completely.


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