What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

Call your doctor if you have:

  1. A red, sore, or painful spot on your breast.
  2. Painful engorgement (overfull breasts).
  3. A fever or if you feel achy. These may be signs of an infection.

You also should call your doctor if your baby is losing weight for no apparent reason.


Loratadine Levels and Effects while Breastfeeding

Drug Levels

After a single oral dose of 40 mg of loratadine in 6 women, average peak milk levels of (range to 39) mcg/L occurred at two hours after the dose.

In addition, average desloratadine peak milk levels of 16 (range 9 to ) mcg/L occurred at hours after the dose. The entire quantity excreted in milk over 48 hours was mcg of loratadine and its metabolite. However, the dose istered was four times greater than the usual dose of the drug, so a entire dose of about 3 mcg would be expected with a 10 mg dose. The calculated average and maximum expected doses of loratadine plus desloratadine in milk were and % and of the maternal weight-adjusted dose, respectively, after the 40 mg dose.[2]

Alternate Drugs to Consider

Desloratadine, Fexofenadine

Summary of Use during Lactation

Because of its lack of sedation and low milk levels, maternal use of loratadine would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants.

Loratadine might own a negative effect on lactation, especially in combination with a sympathomimetic agent such as pseudoephedrine. The British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology recommends loratadine at its lowest dose as a preferred choice if an antihistamine is required during breastfeeding.[1]

Effects on Lactation and Breastmilk

Antihistamines in relatively high doses given by injection can decrease basal serum prolactin in nonlactating women and in early postpartum women.[5][6] However, suckling-induced prolactin secretion is not affected by antihistamine pretreatment of postpartum mothers.[5] Whether lower oral doses of antihistamines own the same effect on serum prolactin or whether the effects on prolactin own any consequences on breastfeeding success own not been studied.

The prolactin level in a mom with established lactation may not affect her ability to breastfeed.

One mom out of 51 mothers who took loratadine while nursing reported that she had decreased milk production after taking loratadine 10 mg daily for less than one week at 4 months postpartum.[3]

Effects in Breastfed Infants

A survey of 51 mothers who took loratadine during breastfeeding between and was conducted by a teratogen information service.

Most of the infants were over 2 months ancient and loratadine was generally taken for one week or less. Two mothers reported minor sedation in their infants, one at 3 days of age and one at 3 months of age. Both mothers were taking a dose of 10 mg daily. Weight acquire and psychomotor development were similar to infants in a control group of breastfed infants unexposed to medications.[3] An extension of the study that compared the results of this study (plus one additional patient) to that of a control group of 88 mothers who took a drug known to be safe while breastfeeding.

No differences in sedation or any other side effects (p=) in the baby were found between mothers who took loratadine during breastfeeding and those of the control group.[4]

References

1. Powell RJ, Du Toit GL, Siddique N et al. BSACI guidelines for the management of chronic urticaria and angio-oedema. Clin Exp Allergy. ; PMID:

2. Hilbert J, Radwanski E, Affine MB et al. Excretion of loratadine in human breast milk. J Clin Pharmacol. ; PMID:

3. Messinis IE, Souvatzoglou A, Fais N et al. Histamine H1 receptor participation in the control of prolactin secretion in postpartum. J Endocrinol Invest. ; PMID:

4. Merlob P, Stahl B.

Prospective follow-up of adverse reactions in breast-fed infants exposed to loratadine treatment (). BELTIS Newsl. ;Number

5. Merlob P. Prospective follow-up of adverse reactions in breast-fed infants exposed to maternal loratadine treatment (). Unpublished manuscript.

6. Pontiroli AE, De Castro e Silva E, Mazzoleni F et al. The effect of histamine and H1 and H2 receptors on prolactin and luteinizing hormone release in humans: sex differences and the role of stress.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab. ; PMID:


Path to improved health

Breastfeeding promotes wellbeing for you and your baby. Although it is a natural part of the birthing process, it’s not always simple. Numerous women need assist learning how to breastfeed. The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recommends that every doctors provide assistance to women during pregnancy and after birth to support breastfeeding. Your doctor may recommend breastfeeding for at least the first 6 months of your baby’s life.

Below are helpful tips to assist you get off to a excellent start.

How should I hold my baby while breastfeeding?

You can hold your baby in a number of ways.

Some of the most common positions are:

  1. Cradle. Put your baby’s head in the criminal of your arm. Support your baby’s back and bottom with your forearm. Your baby should be lying facing you. Your breast should be correct in front of your baby’s face.
  2. Side-lying.While lying below, put your baby alongside you. Your baby should be facing you. Tug your baby shut to you so he or she can latch on. You can use a pillow to prop up, if needed. This position can assist if you had a cesarean section (C-section).

    You don’t desire to drop asleep while nursing in this (or any other) position. Co-sleeping can be dangerous for your baby. It increases the risk of Sudden Baby Death Syndrome (SIDS).

  3. Football. Tuck your baby under your arm, along your side. His or her head should be resting in your hand. Support your baby’s body with your forearm. Your baby should be facing you. This position can assist if you had a C-section. It also can assist if your breasts are large, your baby is little, or you own multiple babies.
  4. Cross-cradle. Hold your baby with the opposite arm of the breast you’re using. Support your baby’s head and bottom with the palm of your hand and forearm.

    Your baby should still be lying facing you. This position can assist premature babies or babies who own a feeble suck. It provides added head support.

How do I know if my baby is getting enough milk?

Your baby is getting enough milk if he or she:

  1. Acts satisfied after each feeding.
  2. Gains weight consistently after the first 3 to 7 days after birth.

    What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

    (Your baby may lose a little weight during the first week after being born.)

  3. Has about 6 to 8 wet diapers a day.
  4. Has about 2 to 5 or more stools a day at first. This number may decrease to about 2 stools or less a day.

Sometimes babies drop asleep while nursing. You can squeeze your breast to make more milk flow. This may awaken your baby. If you are not certain he or she got enough milk, offer your other breast to see if your baby latches on again.

Before you give birth

During pregnancy, the following things can prepare you for breastfeeding.

  1. Talk to your doctor. Make certain your doctor knows you plan to breastfeed.

    They can give you some resources. Enquire questions about what type of care the hospital provides after birth. Some offer lactation consultants, who are breastfeeding specialists.

  2. Breastfeeding class. Some women discover that taking a class can assist them practice for the genuine thing.
  3. Place your baby in one of the breastfeeding positions (outline below).
  4. Prenatal care.It’s significant to take excellent care of yourself and your baby.

    Babies who are born early (premature) own a harder time breastfeeding.

  5. Wash your hands before each feeding.
  6. Breastfeeding items. Plan ahead by purchasing the items you need. These can include a nursing pillow, nursing bra, and covers. Some hospitals and insurance plans provide free breast pumps.
  7. Touch your baby’s lips to your nipple until your baby opens their mouth wide.
  8. Put the thumb of your free hand on top of your breast and your other fingers below.
  9. Put your nipple every the way in your baby’s mouth and tug your baby shut to you. This lets your baby’s jaw squeeze the milk ducts under your areola (nipple).

How can I increase my milk supply?

If you ponder your baby needs more milk, increase the number of feedings a day.

It’s significant for you to get plenty of relax and eat correct. Give your body time to catch up to your baby’s demands.

Don’t replace breast milk with baby formula or cereal. This can make babies lose interest in breast milk. It also will decrease your milk supply. You shouldn’t give your baby solid foods until about 6 months of age.

What is the let-down reflex?

The let-down reflex means your milk is ready to flow. It makes breastfeeding easier for you and your baby.

You may feel a tingle in your breast(s) as you start to breastfeed. Milk may drip from the breast not being used. These are signs that your milk has “let-down.” The let-down reflex also may happen if a feeding is overdue, if you hear a baby weep, or if you ponder about your baby.

The reflex can be forceful enough to cause your baby to cough. If this is a problem, attempt to discharge some of your milk by hand before a feeding.

Breastfeeding

Once your baby is born, your breasts will start to fill up.

At first, your body will produce a “pre-milk,” called colostrum. This can be thin and watery or thick and more yellow-colored. The pre-milk has a slower flow to assist your baby study to nurse. After 3 to 4 days of nursing, your genuine breast milk will come in.

Most babies are ready to eat 1 to 2 hours after birth. Under is a step-by-step guide on how to breastfeed.

  • Place your baby in one of the breastfeeding positions (outline below).
  • Put the thumb of your free hand on top of your breast and your other fingers below.
  • Make sucking motions.
  • Wash your hands before each feeding.
  • Put your nipple every the way in your baby’s mouth and tug your baby shut to you.

    This lets your baby’s jaw squeeze the milk ducts under your areola (nipple).

  • Touch your baby’s lips to your nipple until your baby opens their mouth wide.
  • Put their hands in their mouth.
  • Turn toward the breast if they are being held.
  • Become excited or alert.

How do I know if my baby is latched on?

When your baby is “latched on,” the correct way, both lips should pout out and cover almost every of your areola. Your baby’s jaw should start to move back and forth.

Your baby may make low-pitched swallowing noises instead of smacking noises. If you feel pain while your baby is nursing, they may not be latched on.

Your baby’s nose may touch your breast during nursing. Babies’ noses are designed to permit air to get in and out. If you’re concerned your baby can’t breathe easily, gently press below on your breast near your baby’s nose to give them more room to breathe. Your baby shouldn’t own to turn his or her head or strain his or her neck to nurse.

How often should I feed my baby?

Feed your baby as often as he or she wants to be fed.

Study how to tell when your baby is hungry. Crying can be a sign of hunger, but it may be too tardy. Babies who are crying or are upset own a harder time latching on. Watch out for early signs of hunger. Your baby may:

  1. Make sucking motions.
  2. Turn toward the breast if they are being held.
  3. Put their hands in their mouth.
  4. Become excited or alert.

After birth, your baby may be hungry 8 to 12 times a day or more. This number may decrease over time or increase during a growth spurt. Growth spurts happen at about 2 weeks and 6 weeks of age and again at about 3 months and 6 months of age.

Let your baby eat until they are satisfied.

This may be for about 15 to 20 minutes at each breast. Attempt to own your baby nurse from both breasts at each feeding. Make certain your baby finishes one breast before starting the other. Your baby should let go on their own once they are done.

Don’t limit the time you let your baby nurse. It may hold your milk ducts from completely emptying.

What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

This can decrease your milk flow and make it harder for your baby to latch it on. It also can cause swelling and pain. Applying a freezing compress before nursing can ease discomfort.

What if I work?

There is no reason you own to stop breastfeeding when you return to work. Make a plan for pumping your breast milk at work. The federal Break Time for Nursing Mothers law requires your employer to provide basic accommodations for breastfeeding mothers at work, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). “These accommodations include time for women to express milk and a private space that is not a bathroom each time they need to pump,” reports the HHS.

Breastfeed your baby before you leave for work, and every hours at work (or however often you would normally feed your baby).

Hold the milk refrigerated and your baby can own it the next day while you are at work. It keeps for up to 4 days in the refrigerator. If you aren’t going to use the milk within 4 days, freeze it. Breastmilk will final up to month in the freezer. After work, breastfeed your baby as you normally would.

How do I know if my baby is latched on?

When your baby is “latched on,” the correct way, both lips should pout out and cover almost every of your areola.

What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

Your baby’s jaw should start to move back and forth. Your baby may make low-pitched swallowing noises instead of smacking noises. If you feel pain while your baby is nursing, they may not be latched on.

Your baby’s nose may touch your breast during nursing. Babies’ noses are designed to permit air to get in and out. If you’re concerned your baby can’t breathe easily, gently press below on your breast near your baby’s nose to give them more room to breathe. Your baby shouldn’t own to turn his or her head or strain his or her neck to nurse.

How often should I feed my baby?

Feed your baby as often as he or she wants to be fed. Study how to tell when your baby is hungry.

Crying can be a sign of hunger, but it may be too tardy. Babies who are crying or are upset own a harder time latching on. Watch out for early signs of hunger. Your baby may:

  1. Make sucking motions.
  2. Turn toward the breast if they are being held.
  3. Put their hands in their mouth.
  4. Become excited or alert.

After birth, your baby may be hungry 8 to 12 times a day or more. This number may decrease over time or increase during a growth spurt.

What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

Growth spurts happen at about 2 weeks and 6 weeks of age and again at about 3 months and 6 months of age.

Let your baby eat until they are satisfied. This may be for about 15 to 20 minutes at each breast. Attempt to own your baby nurse from both breasts at each feeding. Make certain your baby finishes one breast before starting the other. Your baby should let go on their own once they are done.

Don’t limit the time you let your baby nurse. It may hold your milk ducts from completely emptying. This can decrease your milk flow and make it harder for your baby to latch it on. It also can cause swelling and pain. Applying a freezing compress before nursing can ease discomfort.

What if I work?

There is no reason you own to stop breastfeeding when you return to work.

Make a plan for pumping your breast milk at work. The federal Break Time for Nursing Mothers law requires your employer to provide basic accommodations for breastfeeding mothers at work, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). “These accommodations include time for women to express milk and a private space that is not a bathroom each time they need to pump,” reports the HHS.

Breastfeed your baby before you leave for work, and every hours at work (or however often you would normally feed your baby).

Hold the milk refrigerated and your baby can own it the next day while you are at work. It keeps for up to 4 days in the refrigerator. If you aren’t going to use the milk within 4 days, freeze it. Breastmilk will final up to month in the freezer. After work, breastfeed your baby as you normally would.


Resources

National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Kid Health and Human Development: Breastfeeding and Breast Milk

National Institutes of Health, MedlinePlus: Breastfeeding

U.S.

Department of Health & Human Services, Office on Women’s Health: Learning to Breastfeed

en españolLactancia materna frente a lactancia con leche de fórmula

Choosing whether to breastfeed or formula feed their baby is one of the biggest decisions expectant and new parents will make.

Healt experts believe breast milk is the best nutritional choice for infants.

What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

But breastfeeding may not be possible for every women. For numerous, the decision to breastfeed or formula feed is based on their comfort level, lifestyle, and specific medical situations.

For moms who can’t breastfeed or who decide not to, baby formula is a healthy alternative. Formula provides babies with the nutrients they need to grow and thrive.

Some mothers worry that if they don’t breastfeed, they won’t bond with their baby. But the truth is, loving mothers will always create a special bond with their children. And feeding — no matter how — is a grand time to strengthen that bond.

The decision to breastfeed or formula feed your baby is a personal one.

Weighing the pros and cons of each method can assist you decide what is best for you and your baby.

All About Breastfeeding

Nursing can be a amazing experience for both mom and baby. It provides ideal nourishment and a special bonding experience that numerous mothers cherish.

A number of health organizations — including the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Medical Association (AMA), and the World Health Organization (WHO) — recommend breastfeeding as the best choice for babies.

Breastfeeding helps defend against infections, prevent allergies, and protect against a number of chronic conditions.

The AAP recommends thatbabies be breastfed exclusively for the first 6 months. Beyond that, breastfeeding is encouraged until at least 12 months, and longer if both the mom and baby are willing.

Here are some of the numerous benefits of breastfeeding:

Fighting infections and other conditions. Breastfed babies own fewer infections and hospitalizations than formula-fed infants.

During breastfeeding, antibodies and other germ-fighting factors pass from a mom to her baby and strengthen the immune system. This helps lower a baby’s chances of getting numerous infections, including:

Breastfeeding also may protect babies against:

Breastfeeding is particularly beneficial for premature babies.

Nutrition and ease of digestion. Often called the «perfect food» for a human baby’s digestive system, breast milk’s components — lactose, protein (whey and casein), and fat — are easily digested by a newborn.

As a group, breastfed infants own less difficulty with digestion than do formula-fed infants. Breast milk tends to be more easily digested so that breastfed babies own fewer bouts of diarrhea or constipation.

Breast milk also naturally contains numerous of the vitamins and minerals that a newborn requires.

One exception is vitamin D — the AAP recommends that every breastfed babies start receiving vitamin D supplements during the first 2 months and continuing until a babyconsumes enough vitamin D-fortified formula or milk (after 1 year of age).

The U.S. Food and Drug istration (FDA) regulates formula companies to ensure they provide every the necessary nutrients (including vitamin D) in their formulas. Still, commercial formulas can’t completely match breast milk’s exact composition.

Why? Because milk is a living substance made by each mom for her individual baby, a process that can’t be duplicated in a factory.

Free. Breast milk doesn’t cost a cent, while the cost of formula quickly adds up. And unless you’re pumping breast milk and giving it to your baby, there’s no need for bottles, nipples, and other supplies that can be costly. Since breastfed babies are less likely to be ill, that may mean they make fewer trips to the doctor’s office, so fewer co-pays and less money are paidfor prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines.

Different tastes.Nursing mothers generally need to additional calories per day, which should come from a wide variety of well-balanced foods.

This introduces breastfed babies to diverse tastes through their mothers’ breast milk, which has diverse flavors depending on what their mothers own eaten. By tasting the foods of their «culture,» breastfed infants more easily accept solid foods.

Convenience. With no last-minute runs to the store for more formula, breast milk is always unused and available whether you’re home or out and about. And when women breastfeed, there’s no need to wash bottles and nipples or warm up bottles in the middle of the night.

Smarter babies. Some studies propose that children who were exclusively breastfed own slightly higher IQs than children who were formula fed.

«Skin-to-skin» contact. Numerous nursing mothers really enjoy the experience of bonding so closely with their babies.

And the skin-to-skin contact can enhance the emotional connection between mom and infant.

Beneficial for mom, too. The ability to totally nourish a baby can assist a new mom feel confident in her ability to care for her baby.

What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

Breastfeeding also burns calories and helps shrink the uterus, so nursing moms may be capable to return to their pre-pregnancy shape and weight quicker. Also, studies show that breastfeeding helps lower the risk of breast cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and also may assist decrease the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer.

Breastfeeding Challenges

Breastfeeding can beeasy from the get-go for some mothers, but take a while to get used to for others. Moms and babies need plenty of patience to get used to the routine of breastfeeding.

Common concerns of new moms, especially during the first few weeks and months, may include:

Personal comfort. Initially, numerous moms feel uncomfortable with breastfeeding.

But with proper education, support, and practice, most moms overcome this.

Latch-on pain is normal for the first week to 10 days, and should final less than a minute with each feeding. But if breastfeeding hurts throughout feedings, or if their nipples and/or breasts are sore, it’s a excellent thought for breastfeeding mothers to get assist from a lactation consultant or their doctor. Numerous times, it’s just a matter of using the proper technique, but sometimes pain can mean that something else is going on, love an infection.

Time and frequency of feedings. Breastfeeding requires a large time commitment from mothers, especially in the beginning, when babies feed often.

A breastfeeding schedule or the need to pump breast milk during the day can make it harder for some moms to work, run errands, or travel.

And breastfed babies do need to eat more often than babies who take formula, because breast milk digests faster than formula. This means mom may discover herself in demand every 2 or 3 hours (maybe more, maybe less) in the first few weeks.

Diet. Women who are breastfeeding need to be aware ofwhat they eat and drink, since these can be passed to the baby through the breast milk.

Just love during pregnancy, breastfeeding women should not eatfish that are high in mercury and should limit consumption of lower mercury fish.

If a mom drinks alcohol, a little quantity can pass to the baby through breast milk. She should wait at least 2 hours after a single alcoholic drink to breastfeed to avoid passing any alcohol to the baby. Caffeine intake should be kept to no more than milligrams (about one to three cups of regular coffee) or less per day because it cancause problems love restlessness and irritability in some babies.

Maternal medical conditions, medicines, and breast surgery. Medical conditions such as HIV or AIDS or those that involve chemotherapy or treatment with certain medicines can make breastfeeding unsafe.

A lady should check with her doctor or a lactation consultant if she’s unsure if she should breastfeed with a specific condition. Women should always check with the doctor about the safety of taking medicines while breastfeeding, including over-the-counter and herbal medicines.

Mothers who’ve had breast surgery, such as a reduction, may own difficulty with their milk supply if their milk ducts own been severed. In this situation, a lady should to talk to her doctor about her concerns and work with a lactation specialist.

Formula Feeding Challenges

As with breastfeeding, there are some challenges to consider when deciding whether to formula feed.

Lack of antibodies. None of the antibodies found in breast milk are in manufactured formula.

So formula can’t provide a baby with the added protection against infection and illness that breast milk does.

Can’t match the complexity of breast milk. Manufactured formulas own yet to duplicate the complexity of breast milk, which changes as the baby’s needs change.

Planning and organization. Unlike breast milk — which is always available, unlimited, and served at the correct temperature — formula feeding your baby requires planning and organization to make certain that you own what you need when you need it.

Parents must purchase formula and make certain it’s always on hand to avoid late-night runs to the store.

And it’s significant to always own the necessary supplies (like bottles and nipples) clean, easily accessible, and ready to go — otherwise, you will own a extremely hungry, extremely fussy baby to answer to. With feedings in a hour period, parents can quickly get overwhelmed if they’re not prepared and organized.

Expense. Formula can be costly. Powdered formula is the least expensive, followed by concentrated, with ready-to-feed being the most expensive. And specialty formulas (such assoy and hypoallergenic) cost more — sometimes far more — than the basic formulas.

During the first year of life, the cost of basic formula can run about $1,

Possibility of producing gas and constipation. Formula-fed babies may own more gas and firmer bowel movements than breastfed babies.

All About Formula Feeding

Commercially prepared baby formulas are a nutritious alternative to breast milk, and even contain some vitamins and nutrients that breastfed babies need to get from supplements.

Manufactured under sterile conditions, commercial formulas attempt to duplicate mother’s milk using a complicated combination of proteins, sugars, fats, and vitamins that aren’t possible to create at home.

So if you don’t breastfeed your baby, it’s significant to use only commercially prepared formula and not attempt to make your own.

Besides medical concerns that may prevent breastfeeding, for some women, breastfeeding may be too hard or stressful. Here are other reasons women may select to formula feed:

Convenience. Either parent (or another caregiver) can feed the baby a bottle at any time (although this is also true for women who pump their breast milk).

This allows mom to share the feeding duties and helps her partner to feel more involved in the crucial feeding process and the bonding that often comes with it.

Flexibility. Once the bottles are made, a formula-feeding mom can leave her baby with a partner or caregiver and know that her little one’s feedings are taken care of. There’s no need to pump or to schedule work or other obligations and activities around the baby’s feeding schedule. And formula-feeding moms don’t need to discover a private put to nurse in public.

Time and frequency of feedings. Because formula is less digestiblethan breast milk, formula-fed babies generally need to eat less often than breastfed babies.

Diet. Women who opt to formula feed don’t own to worry about the things they eat or drink that could affect their babies.

Making a Choice

Deciding how you will feed your baby can be a hard decision.

You’ll really only know the correct choice for your family when your baby comes.

Many women decide on one method before the birth and then change their minds after their baby is born. And numerous women decide to breastfeed and supplement with formula because they discover that is the best choice for their family and their lifestyle.

While you’re weighing the pros and cons, talk to your doctor or lactation consultant. These health care providers can give you more information about your options and assist you make the best decision for your family.

Loratadine use while Breastfeeding

Drugs containing Loratadine: Claritin, Claritin-D, Alavert, Claritin-D 24 Hour, Allergy Relief Tablets, Loratadine-D 24 Hour, Wal-itin, Claritin 24 Hour Allergy, Claritin-D 12 Hour, Alavert D Hour Allergy and Sinus, Show every 31 »Claritin Reditabs, Tavist ND, AllerClear D Hour, Allergy Relief D12, Allergy & Congestion Relief, Leader Allergy Relief D, Loratadine-D 12 Hour, Clear-Atadine-D, Loratadine Reditab, Childrens Claritin Allergy, Bactimicina Allergy, Clear-Atadine Childrens, Dimetapp Childrens ND Non-Drowsy Allergy, Claritin Hives Relief, Clear-Atadine, ohm Allergy Relief, Assist I Own Allergies, Vicks QlearQuil Every Day & Every Night 24 Hour Allergy Relief, Childrens Allergy Relief 24 Hour, Allergy Relief 24 Hour, Allergy Relief D 24 Hour

Medically reviewed by Final updated on Jul 13,


Things to consider

What food should I eat while breastfeeding?

The best diet is well balanced and has plenty of calcium.

A balanced diet includes eating from every 5 food groups. You should get 5 servings of milk or dairy products each day. It is okay to eat foods that were restricted while you were pregnant. These will not make your baby sick.

If you don’t eat meat or dairy, you can get calcium from foods such as broccoli, sesame seeds, tofu, and kale. Talk to your doctor about taking a calcium supplement if you don’t get enough from your diet.

You should eat about additional calories per day. Make certain you drink additional fluids as well.

Continue to take a prenatal vitamin so your body gets enough nutrients.

What should I avoid while breastfeeding?

Certain foods can annoy your baby. They may make him or her fussy or gassy.

What can you do for allergies while breastfeeding

Pay attention to what you eat and how your baby acts after feedings. Stop eating foods that affect them. These may include spicy foods, broccoli, or milk.

Some babies react to cow’s milk in your diet. Symptoms can include gas, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, or colic. Your baby also can own an allergic reaction to something you eat. Common foods are eggs and peanuts. They may get a rash or own trouble breathing. Contact your doctor correct away if your baby has any of these signs.

Limit your intake of caffeine and alcohol. These can get into your milk.

Don’t own more than a couple cups of coffee, tea, soda, or other caffeine each day. Don’t own more than one alcoholic drink each day. Avoid drinking caffeine and alcohol less than 2 hours before a feeding.

Some medicines can get into your milk. This includes over-the-counter drugs and prescriptions, such as antidepressants and birth control medicines. Don’t take anything without talking to your doctor first. Smoking also is bad for breastfeeding.

The chemicals and smoke can get in your milk. Smoking can cause you to make less milk. If you smoke, attempt to quit.

If possible, avoid using bottles or pacifiers after birth. This can confuse your baby and make breastfeeding harder.

What can I do if my nipples get sore?

It’s easier to prevent sore nipples than it is to treat them. The main cause of sore nipples is when your baby doesn’t latch on the correct way. You need to start over to correct this. To take your baby off your breast, release the suction by putting your finger in the corner of your baby’s mouth between the gums. Switch breasts and attempt to breastfeed again.

Other ways to assist prevent and heal sore nipples are:

  1. Offer your baby the less sore of your two nipples first.

    Your baby’s sucking may be less forceful after the first few minutes.

  2. If possible, position cracked or tender parts of your breast at the corner of your baby’s mouth. This way the spots get less pressure during feeding.
  3. Wash your nipples daily with warm water. Don’t use soap or lotion that may contain alcohol. This can dry out your skin.
  4. Make certain your baby is sucking the correct way.

    If the sucking hurts, your baby’s mouth may not be in the correct position.

  5. Let your nipples air dry between feedings. Let the milk dry on your nipples instead of wiping it off.
  6. Change positions.
  7. Avoid bra pads lined with plastic. Change bra pads between feedings to hold your nipples dry.
  8. Rub lanolin on your nipples to assist soothe them.
  9. Discharge milk with your hand until the let-down reflex occurs. This can assist make your milk flow easier so your baby sucks less hard.


Questions to enquire your doctor

  1. Where can I take a breastfeeding class?
  2. What type of breastfeeding care and information will the hospital provide after birth?
  3. What can I do if my body is not producing enough milk?
  4. What should I do if my baby won’t latch on?
  5. Is it okay to give my baby bottles or pacifiers?


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