What can i give my 6 month old baby for allergies

Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors tell, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can assist prevent peanut allergies. Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors tell, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can assist prevent peanut allergies.

Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Peanut allergies can be among a parent’s biggest worries, though we’ve had excellent evidence for more than a year that when most babies are 6 months ancient or so, introducing foods that contain finely ground peanuts can actually reduce babies’ chances of becoming allergic to the legumes.

Even so, numerous parents are terrified to do that.

At this week’s annual scientific meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in San Francisco, doctors are discussing the coming federal guidelines about how and when to safely add peanuts to an infant’s diet.

The final version, being developed under the auspices of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, won’t be released until early next year. But Dr. Amal Assa’ad, an immunologist and allergist with the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Middle who helped record the recommendations, offered Shots a hint of where she and her colleagues are headed.

First, parents need to know whether their baby is at high risk of developing a peanut allergy, Assa’ad says.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

Signs of that include a history of severe eczema — which causes dry, itchy skin and rashes — or an allergy to eggs.

If your baby falls into that category, she says, enquire your pediatrician whether the baby should be further checked by an allergist for a specific sensitivity to peanuts. Even most babies who show that sort of sensitivity can be introduced to age-appropriate foods containing peanuts and get the allergy-preventing benefit, she says, though in some cases doctors will advise the introduction take put in the doctor’s office, not at home.

The guidelines are largely based on dramatic findings from a large study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2015.

Researchers found that babies at high risk of developing a peanut allergy who were fed the equivalent of about 4 heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting at the age of 4 to 11 months, were about 80 percent less likely to develop an allergy to the legume by age 5 than similar kids who avoided peanuts. The benefit held up even after the children stopped getting the puree, a follow-up study found.

Allergic reactions to peanuts can range from hives or rashes to, in the most extreme cases, trouble breathing and even death.

For children who are not at high risk for developing a peanut allergy, foods containing the legume can be introduced at home starting at about 6 months, after a healthy baby has started to eat some other solid food, Assa’ad says.

(Peanut products shouldn’t be the first solid food a baby gets, she adds.)

Still, under no circumstance should parents feed their babies whole peanuts, which is a clear choking hazard, cautions Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, a pediatrician and immunologist at Northwestern University, in an ACAAI video aimed at parents. Even peanut butter can be risky at that age, Gupta explains, because it’s thick and sticky.

The best way to introduce the food, she says, is to add boiling water to 2 teaspoons of peanut butter to make a warm puree.

Put a little of this puree on the tip of a spoon and feed it to your kid. Then wait and watch for 10 minutes, she advises, checking the baby for any negative reaction, such as hives, a rash, behavior changes or trouble breathing. If every is OK you can continue to feed the puree slowly; but hold an eye on the kid for about two hours.

If the baby continues to show no signs of an allergic reaction, Gupta says, it’s safe to continue, adding other peanut-containing foods as time goes on.

Share with other parents

Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors tell, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can assist prevent peanut allergies.

Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors tell, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can assist prevent peanut allergies.

Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Peanut allergies can be among a parent’s biggest worries, though we’ve had excellent evidence for more than a year that when most babies are 6 months ancient or so, introducing foods that contain finely ground peanuts can actually reduce babies’ chances of becoming allergic to the legumes.

Even so, numerous parents are terrified to do that.

At this week’s annual scientific meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in San Francisco, doctors are discussing the coming federal guidelines about how and when to safely add peanuts to an infant’s diet.

The final version, being developed under the auspices of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, won’t be released until early next year.

But Dr. Amal Assa’ad, an immunologist and allergist with the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Middle who helped record the recommendations, offered Shots a hint of where she and her colleagues are headed.

First, parents need to know whether their baby is at high risk of developing a peanut allergy, Assa’ad says. Signs of that include a history of severe eczema — which causes dry, itchy skin and rashes — or an allergy to eggs.

If your baby falls into that category, she says, enquire your pediatrician whether the baby should be further checked by an allergist for a specific sensitivity to peanuts.

Even most babies who show that sort of sensitivity can be introduced to age-appropriate foods containing peanuts and get the allergy-preventing benefit, she says, though in some cases doctors will advise the introduction take put in the doctor’s office, not at home.

The guidelines are largely based on dramatic findings from a large study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2015. Researchers found that babies at high risk of developing a peanut allergy who were fed the equivalent of about 4 heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting at the age of 4 to 11 months, were about 80 percent less likely to develop an allergy to the legume by age 5 than similar kids who avoided peanuts.

The benefit held up even after the children stopped getting the puree, a follow-up study found.

Allergic reactions to peanuts can range from hives or rashes to, in the most extreme cases, trouble breathing and even death.

For children who are not at high risk for developing a peanut allergy, foods containing the legume can be introduced at home starting at about 6 months, after a healthy baby has started to eat some other solid food, Assa’ad says. (Peanut products shouldn’t be the first solid food a baby gets, she adds.)

Still, under no circumstance should parents feed their babies whole peanuts, which is a clear choking hazard, cautions Dr.

Ruchi S. Gupta, a pediatrician and immunologist at Northwestern University, in an ACAAI video aimed at parents.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

Even peanut butter can be risky at that age, Gupta explains, because it’s thick and sticky.

The best way to introduce the food, she says, is to add boiling water to 2 teaspoons of peanut butter to make a warm puree. Put a little of this puree on the tip of a spoon and feed it to your kid. Then wait and watch for 10 minutes, she advises, checking the baby for any negative reaction, such as hives, a rash, behavior changes or trouble breathing. If every is OK you can continue to feed the puree slowly; but hold an eye on the kid for about two hours.

If the baby continues to show no signs of an allergic reaction, Gupta says, it’s safe to continue, adding other peanut-containing foods as time goes on.

Observational studies

Several observational studies own suggested that early introduction of potentially allergenic foods may be associated with a decreased risk of developing food allergy.

A questionnaire-based survey conducted in 2008 found that the prevalence of peanut allergy was ten-fold higher among Jewish children in the United Kingdom (UK) compared with Jewish children in Israel [12]. This difference in prevalence was attributed to earlier and more frequent peanut exposure in the first year of life in Israel compared with the UK. A population-based, cross-sectional study (HealthNuts) that included over 2500 infants found a lower risk of egg allergy among those that were introduced to egg at 4–6 month of age compared to those introduced at 10–12 months of age or later [13]. Another observational study examining the feeding history of over 13,000 infants found the incidence of IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy to be significantly lower in infants who were introduced to cow’s milk formula within the first 14 days of life and given it regularly thereafter, compared to those who were introduced to the formula after 3 months of age [14].

Similarly, a case–control study that included approximately 200 children showed that early introduction of cow’s milk formula was associated with a lower incidence of IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy [15]. Data from a Finnish birth cohort that included 994 children found that delaying the introduction of multiple foods, including oats (> 5 months) and wheat (> 6 months), was significantly associated with an increased risk of allergic sensitization to food and inhalant allergens [16]. Another birth cohort study conducted in the United States (US) showed that introducing solid food or cow’s milk (complementary food) at less than 4 months of age was associated with a reduced risk of peanut allergy by age 2–3 years in children with a parental history of asthma or allergy [17].

A study that included approximately 1600 children observed that delaying initial exposure to cereal grains until 6 months of age may increase the risk of developing IgE-mediated wheat allergy [18]. More recently, data from over 2100 children included in the Canadian Healthy Baby Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort study showed that delaying the introduction of cow’s milk products, egg, and peanut beyond the first year of life significantly increased the odds of sensitization to these foods [19].

Prospective clinical trials

In recent years, randomized controlled trials own provided further support for the association between early food introduction and the prevention of food allergy.

The most compelling evidence to date comes from the LEAP study, which randomized 640 high-risk infants (defined as those with severe eczema and/or egg allergy) in the UK to either early (age 4–11 months) or delayed (avoidance until age 5 years) peanut introduction. The trial showed that the early and regular (3 times per week) consumption of peanut in these high-risk infants reduced the development of peanut allergy by 86% by 5 years of age [4]. The Persistence of Oral Tolerance to Peanut extension of the LEAP study (LEAP-On) investigated whether participants who had consumed peanut in the primary trial would remain protected from peanut allergy after cessation of peanut consumption for 12 months [20].

This extension study found that the benefits of early peanut introduction persisted after 12 months of cessation of peanut consumption, supporting the concept that early peanut tolerance is not a transient phenomenon.

In the Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) trial, 1303 exclusively breastfed infants from the general population were randomized to either early (age 3 months) or standard (age 6 months) introduction of six allergenic foods (peanut, cooked egg, cow’s milk, sesame, whitefish, and wheat) [21]. The EAT investigators hypothesized that early introduction of these allergenic foods would reduce the prevalence of food allergy by age 3 years.

The intention-to-treat analysis revealed a 20% reduction in the prevalence of food allergy in the early introduction group that was not statistically significant, likely because of the high rate of non-adherence to the dietary protocol. However, in an adjusted per protocol analysis, significant reductions were seen in the rates of peanut and egg allergy in the early introduction group.

Other prospective trials own investigated the effects of early egg introduction. In the Prevention of Egg Allergy with Tiny Quantity Intake (PETIT) trial, 147 Japanese infants with eczema were randomly assigned to daily consumption of heated egg powder or placebo along with aggressive treatment of eczema [22].

The study found that randomization to heated egg powder at age 6 months significantly reduced the risk of egg allergy by 78% compared with avoidance until age 12 months. The trial was stopped early due to benefit. The Solids Timing for Allergy Research (STAR) randomized 86 high-risk infants with moderate-to-severe eczema to get pasteurized raw whole-egg powder or rice powder (placebo) at 4 months of age [23]. At 8 months, both groups were introduced to whole cooked egg under medical supervision.

At 1-year, there was a non-significant trend toward a lower rate of egg allergy in the group who received pasteurized raw egg powder at age 4 months vs. whole cooked egg at age 8 months. However, the trial was terminated early due to the high rate of allergic reactions in the egg-sensitized children randomized to early introduction at age 4 months. The Starting Time of Egg Protein (STEP) study, which included 820 infants without eczema but with a family history of atopy, found that early introduction of pasteurized raw egg powder at age 4–6 months was associated with a non-significant trend toward a reduced risk of egg allergy compared to introduction at age 10 months [24].

A per-protocol analysis found that significantly fewer children in the early introduction group had IgE-mediated egg allergy at 12 months of age.

In the Beating Egg Allergy Trial (BEAT), 319 infants who were SPT-negative to egg but who had a family history of atopy were randomized to get either pasteurized whole-egg powder or placebo at 4 months of age [25]. Subjects were treated until 8 months of age, at which time egg was introduced into the diet. At 1 year, egg sensitization was significantly lower in the treatment group compared with the placebo group. However, there was only a non-significant trend toward a reduced risk of developing egg allergy in the early introduction group.

Findings from the Hen’s Egg Allergy Prevention (HEAP) study also call into question the safety of early pasteurized raw egg introduction [26]. This trial, which included 406 infants from the general population, found no evidence that early introduction of pasteurized raw egg powder at age 4–6 months prevented either egg allergy or egg sensitization. Furthermore, among the children with baseline egg sensitization who were excluded from randomization but then challenged with egg separately (n = 23), two-thirds experienced an anaphylactic reaction upon this initial introduction.

Although the results of egg allergy studies own been conflicting or inconclusive, a recent meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials investigating the timing of allergenic food introduction and the risk of developing food allergy found “moderate certainty” evidence (based on 5 trials, including 1915 children) that introducing egg between 4 and 6 months of age reduced the risk of egg allergy (relative risk [RR], 0.56; p = 0.009) [27], showing much better efficacy with using cooked as opposed to raw egg.

This meta-analysis also found “moderate certainty” evidence (based on 2 trials [LEAP and EAT], 1550 patients) that peanut introduction between age 4–11 months reduced the risk of peanut allergy (RR, 0.29; p = 0.009).


How will I know if my kid has a food allergy?

An allergic reaction can consist of 1 or more of the following:

  1. swollen lips and throat
  2. a cough
  3. itchy skin or rash
  4. wheezing and shortness of breath
  5. diarrhoea or vomiting
  6. runny or blocked nose
  7. itchy throat and tongue
  8. sore, red and itchy eyes

In a few cases, foods can cause a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) that can be life-threatening.

Get medical advice if you ponder your kid is having an allergic reaction to a specific food.

Don’t be tempted to experiment by cutting out a major food, such as milk, because this could lead to your kid not getting the nutrients they need. Talk to your health visitor or GP, who may refer you to a registered dietitian.


What to Do

Keep your kid hydrated

Keeping your kid well hydrated will assist prevent and alleviate constipation.

Select water as the main source of hydration and limit drinks such as fruit juices (and no juice under the age of 1). And remember that in addition to fluids, unused fruits and vegetables can also contribute to proper hydration.

Constipation in infants

When preparing formula, add water first and then the powder to ensure baby is getting enough fluids. If constipation is consistent even with correct preparation of formula, speak with the pediatrician about additional signs that your little one may not be tolerating the formula well.

Even though research indicates that iron in formula may not cause constipation, every babies are diverse.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

If you feel this is the cause, call the pediatrician before switching to a low -iron formula, as iron is significant for growth and development.

If you are breastfeeding and are concerned about your baby having an intolerance or allergy to foods you are eating, contact the pediatrician for more information.

If needed, a little quantity of 100% prune, apple, or pear juice may be added to formula or breastmilk as endless as baby is older than 4 weeks. The general recommendation is to give 1 oz per day for every month of life up to 4 months. For example, a 3 month ancient would be allowed to own 3 oz per day.

Be certain to discuss with your doctor before providing your baby with juice. Note that juice is not recommended for infants younger than 1 year ancient at any other time.

If these dietary changes do not work, or if you are at every concerned, call the pediatrician.

Include lots of fiber in your child’s diet, from vegetables, fruits, beans and whole grains in your child’s diet

The recommended quantity of fiber for toddlers (children 1-3 years old) is about 19 grams of fiber per day.

Examples of foods with fiber include apples and pears (keep the skin on for added fiber), berries, prunes, sweet potatoes, peas, broccoli, beans, oatmeal and whole grain bread or pasta.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

You can’t go incorrect with vegetables and fruits so offer a variety to your kid daily.

For reference, half a cup of cooked beans has about 6-9 grams of fiber, 1 little apple with skin has about 3 grams of fiber and half a cup of broccoli or greens has about 3 grams of fiber.

Check the nutrition facts panel on whole grains to determine the quantity of fiber they provide.

Avoid too numerous low fiber foods

Examples of foods that are either low in or don’t own any fiber include cheese, chips, ice cream, meat and numerous processed foods. Attempt swapping out low fiber foods for those high in fiber.

Try probiotics

Probiotics, or healthy gut bacteria, may also be helpful in relieving constipation.

Attempt adding yogurt or other foods with added probiotics

Breastmilk contains both probiotics and prebiotics, which own been shown to be beneficial for gut health in people of every ages. Research on formulas with prebiotics shown that they may lead to better stool consistency and frequency in infants. So if your baby struggles with constipation and every other dietary changes own not helped, choosing a formula with prebiotics may be beneficial.

Massage your baby

The “I love you” massage for babies and toddlers can be helpful in reducing constipation, abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.

Read Baby massage: Benefits and techniques for every the details.

Encourage your kid to move his bowels

When potty training, enquire your kid frequently if he needs to use the bathroom and visit the bathroom regularly even if your kid does not enquire to go. Assist your kid feel comfortable using the bathroom in places other than your own home.

If constipation persists, contact your healthcare provider

If your kid is experiencing persistent constipation for 2 weeks or constipation accompanied by fever, vomiting, blood in stool, swollen abdomen or weight loss you should contact your child’s pediatrician.

Do not use treatments such as mineral oil, stimulant laxatives, or enemas without consulting your child’s pediatrician.

Sources

Iron Fortification of Baby Formulas.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Volume 104.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

Issue 1 (1999).

BabyConstipationDehydrationDigestionKidTot


Food additives and children

Food contains additives for numerous reasons, such as to preserve it, to help make it safe to eat for longer, and to give colour or texture.

All food additives go through strict safety testing before they can be used. Food labelling must clearly show additives in the list of ingredients, including their name or «E» number and their function, such as «colour» or «preservative».

A few people own adverse reactions to some food additives, love sulphites, but reactions to ordinary foods, such as milk or soya, are much more common.

Read more about food colours and hyperactivity.

Further information

Sheet final reviewed: 24 July 2018
Next review due: 24 July 2021

As any parent can attest, when your young kid comes below with a stuffy nose or a rash, it can be hard to pinpoint the actual cause — is it due to a freezing, an allergy, or something else? In fact, allergies are the most frequently reported chronic medical condition children experience — and food allergies may affect as numerous as 8 percent of every children.

An allergy is the body’s overreaction to a substance in a food that’s either ingested or just present in the environment.

And these culprit substances are called allergens. The causes of allergies in young children aren’t always clear, but allergists own sure that genes can frolic a strong role. If both parents suffer from allergies, the risk of their kid having allergies is about 70 percent. If one parent has allergies, the risk is lower, at about 33 percent.

When should you start watching your kid for allergies? The timeline varies. "Infant allergies to foods can start as soon as a food is introduced, but baby allergies to environmental allergens are unlikely," says Heidi Renner, MD, an assistant professor and internal medicine and pediatric specialist at the Loyola University Medical Middle in suburban Chicago.

"That's because it takes about a year to develop sensitivities to these types of allergens."

Infant Allergies to Foods

"Foods are the most common cause of allergies in children under age 1," explains Dr. Renner. “Mothers who breastfeed may see signs of food allergy when they start to introduce solid foods at about 4 to 6 months."

The most common food allergies in young children are:

  1. Nuts
  2. Eggs
  3. Soy
  4. Milk
  5. Fish and shellfish
  6. Wheat

An baby allergy to cow's milk may show up as soon as the parent introduces formula, because about 80 percent of formulas are milk-based.

Up to 7.5 percent of infants can develop this allergy. So how will you know if your kid is one of them? "Symptoms of kid or baby food allergies may include skin rashes, hives, wheezing, nasal congestion, and digestive problems," Renner notes.

As a child's immune system matures, some food allergies will go away on their own. "About 85 percent of children outgrow food allergies to milk, egg, soy, or wheat by age 5," says Renner. Allergies that are more likely to persist in later years include fish, shellfish, and nuts.

Child Allergies to Environmental Allergens

By the time your baby reaches toddlerhood, at about 18 months, you may see sensitivity to indoor and outdoor allergens show up.

Symptoms can include itchy nose and eyes, nasal congestion, coughing, sneezing, and asthma.

The most common causes of toddler allergies are:

Children are less likely to outgrow environmental allergies than food allergies. While about 50 percent of children who own asthma symptoms caused by allergies appear to outgrow their symptoms by adolescence, when their lungs own matured, the asthma never really goes away, and symptoms often reappear.

If You Suspect Kid Allergies

According to Renner, most of the traditional, allergy-type symptoms, such as a rash or nasal congestion, when experienced by a extremely young kid, are not due to an allergy.

"If babies own allergy symptoms when new foods are introduced or if a parent suspects toddler allergies, the parent should start with a visit to their pediatrician," she says.

Here are some ways pediatricians test for baby and toddler allergies:

  1. Testing the blood (more common for infants and young children)
  2. Asking about the child's symptoms and about any family history of allergies
  3. Testing the skin (usually done with older children)
  4. Doing a physical exam
  5. Eliminating items from the diet to check for food allergies

Once the allergy causes are found, a pediatrician or an allergist can assist you come up with a plan to assist your kid avoid the allergens or to treat the symptoms.

What to Know

  1. Know the symptoms of constipation and when it is most likely to occur
  2. Learn common dietary treatments for constipation

Constipation in children is defined as having fewer than two bowel movements per week and/or difficulty passing stools that are little, hard and dry.

But every kid is diverse. Pay attention to whatever seems regular for your baby, because any deviation from your baby’s “normal” can be unpleasant.

So what causes this discomfort and how can you assist your little one avoid it? Inadequate hydration is the likely constipation culprit, along with eating a diet low in fiber.

It is significant for babies and toddlers to drink enough fluids to hold their bodies properly hydrated and bowels moving regularly. And when increasing the quantity of fiber in your child’s diet, it is significant to hold increasing the quantity of water to assist process the added fiber.

Healthy babies under 6 months are unlikely to experience constipation because they get adequate hydration and nutrients from breastmilk or formula or a combination.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

If your baby is experiencing constipation, here are some reasons it may be occurring:

  1. Intolerance or allergy. Certain proteins in formula may cause constipation if your baby is not tolerating them well. And while rare, a breastfed baby may experience constipation if allergic to some of the foods mom is eating.
  2. Incorrect preparation of formula. Always make certain to add water first, then the formula powder so that baby is getting enough fluids and to ensure the formula is not concentrated.
  3. Solid foods before 4 months.

    Adding cereal or other solid foods before baby is 6 month ancient may also create constipation and other issues.

Contrary to favorite belief, recent studies own found that formulas with iron do not necessarily cause more constipation than formulas without iron.

Once your baby begins eating solid foods (likely around 6 months), constipation may happen. The transition from breastmilk or formula to solid foods is one of the most common times for children to become constipated because the digestive system needs time to adapt.

Some straining during bowel movements is normal (babies still own feeble abdominal muscles). But if your baby exhibits any of these symptoms, he may be constipated:

  1. clenching buttocks muscles
  2. blood streaks along the exterior of the stool
  3. standing on tiptoes and rocking back and forth
  4. abdominal pain with hard and infrequent stools
  5. dry, hard stools with pain upon passing
  6. making dancelike movements
  7. pellet sized stools passed with straining or grunting
  8. stool in underwear, and urinary incontinence or “wetting the bed”

Once in toddlerhood, constipation can happen if your kid holds in his stools.

Numerous children do this as they study to control their bowels, during potty training or when they transition to preschool or daycare.

Although constipation is more common in toddlers than babies, most cases aren’t serious and generally final a short quantity of time. Even though most cases aren’t dangerous, it is significant not to ignore symptoms or leave constipation untreated because it can lead to more serious health problems (such as fecal impaction, anal fissures, and rectal prolapse).


Introducing foods that could trigger allergy

When you start introducing solid foods to your baby from around 6 months ancient, introduce the foods that can trigger allergic reactions one at a time and in extremely little amounts so that you can spot any reaction.

These foods are:

  1. soya
  2. eggs (eggs without a red lion stamp should not be eaten raw or lightly cooked)
  3. seeds (serve them crushed or ground)
  4. foods that contain gluten, including wheat, barley and rye
  5. cows’ milk
  6. shellfish (don’t serve raw or lightly cooked)
  7. nuts and peanuts (serve them crushed or ground)
  8. fish

See more about foods to avoid giving babies and young children.

These foods can be introduced from around 6 months as part of your baby’s diet, just love any other foods.

What can i give my 6 month ancient baby for allergies

Once introduced and if tolerated, these foods should become part of your baby’s usual diet to minimise the risk of allergy.

Evidence has shown that delaying the introduction of peanut and hen’s eggs beyond 6 to 12 months may increase the risk of developing an allergy to these foods.

Lots of children outgrow their allergies to milk or eggs, but a peanut allergy is generally lifelong.

If your kid has a food allergy, read food labels carefully.

Avoid foods if you are not certain whether they contain the food your kid is allergic to.


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