What breed of cat causes least allergies

The Best Cats for People with Allergies

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If you’re an animal lover and an allergy sufferer, you’re not alone. According to theAsthma and Allergy Foundation of America, as numerous as three out of every ten people in the U.S. suffer from pet allergies. Of those, allergic reactions to cats are some of the most common. In fact, it’s estimated that cat allergies are about twice as common as those from dogs.

Humans are not alone, of course. Cats can also suffer from allergies. If you’re curious about what’s causing your cat to own allergies, check out both his environment and his food. Study more about how giving specially formulatedprobiotics forcatscan assist his allergies.


Structure

The finish quaternary structure of Fel d 1 has been determined.[1] The allergen is a tetramericglycoprotein consisting of two disulfide-linked heterodimers of chains 1 and 2.

Fel d 1 chains 1 and 2 share structural similarity with uteroglobin, a secretoglobinsuperfamily member; chain 2 is a glycoprotein with N-linked oligosaccharides. Both chains share an every alpha-helical structure.[1]


Is There Such a Thing as a Hypoallergenic Cat?

Based on what scientists know today, every cats produce Fel d 1, meaning that at present, there are no truly hypoallergenic cat breeds. However, there are some breeds that purportedly cause fewer allergy symptoms than others. Additionally, there are a number of things any cat parent can do to lessen the allergic effects their pets cause.

For example, keeping surfaces in the home clean, bathing and brushing your cat regularly, installing a HEPA air purifier, and steam cleaning carpets can every assist reduce exposure to allergens.

While no cat will be a grand fit for people with severe allergies, here are the cats that may cause fewer allergy symptoms than others:

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Siberian

Siberian cats are highly athletic, strong, and long-haired. At first glance, these cats might not seem love they would be well-suited for pet parents with allergies. However, compared to other cat breeds, Siberians own less dander, shed much less, and produce lower levels of Fel d 1.

This combination of factors decreases the likelihood of eliciting an allergic reaction.

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Javanese

Contrary to the name, Javanese cats are not native to the island of Java in Indonesia. Rather, they were bred in Japan and own adopted a southeast Asian name in the tradition of other Oriental (and especially Siamese) cat breeds. While most cats own three layers of jacket (top layer, middle layer, and undercoat), Javanese cats own only a fine top jacket. Because these cats own less hair, they do not shed as much and are therefore reported to collect and spread fewer allergens.

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Balinese

Also known as the “long-haired Siamese,” Balinese cats are excellent candidates for pet parents with allergies because they produce less of the Fel d 1 protein than other breeds and are therefore more hypoallergenic.

In addition, this breed is notable for its single jacket and relatively little shedding among long-haired cats, meaning it spreads less dander, too. Balinese cats are renowned for their intelligence and friendly demeanors.

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Russian Blue

Despite its name, the Russian Blue is a cat whose fur varies from a light silver to a dark grey. Russian Blues are short-haired but own double coats that own given them a reputation for density and lushness. Love Siberian cats, Russian Blues are believed to produce less Fel d 1 and also shed much less than their thick coats would propose.

Personality-wise, Russian blues are pleasant companions who develop shut relationships with their parents.

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Devon Rex

The Devon Rex has several unique physical characteristics: large ears, a lightweight jacket, and hair that grows in curls and waves love a poodle. Devon Rexes own a jacket composed of soft below, with extremely little hair as a top jacket. As a result, these cats do not shed as much as hairier breeds. This lack of shedding reduces the quantity of saliva-coated particles in the air.

While other hairless or less hairy breeds require frequent bathing, the Devon Rex calls for less maintenance; for most grooming sessions, cleaning the paws and ears only will suffice.

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Oriental Shorthair

The Oriental Shorthair is part of the Siamese family of cats. With more than 300 colors and patterns, Oriental Shorthairs own the largest range of physical characteristics of every cat breeds. With regard to allergies, they own a short, fine jacket that does not shed often.

Because of this, pet parents of Oriental Shorthairs report these cats spread fewer allergens around the home. Frequent grooming can also minimize dander and as an extension the possibility of an allergic reaction.

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Sphynx

Known for its hairlessness, the Sphynx cat was first bred in the . Numerous frequently consider the Sphynx cat less allergenic because it does not own any fur to trap allergens. Even though this breed does not own any fur, Sphynx cats actually require a lot of grooming, especially baths, to remove oils on the skin and wax in the ears.

Exterior of their physical appearance and grooming needs, Sphynx cats are famously extroverted creatures, exhibiting friendliness toward strangers and affection for their parents.

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Cornish Rex

Closely related to Devon Rexes, Cornish Rex cats also only own a single jacket of fur. This lack of fur means that Cornish Rexes shed less than other breeds, but love the Sphynx cat, they require frequent bathing in order to get rid of excess oil on the skin. The combined lack of shedding and frequent bathing reduces the buildup of dander and saliva on these cats, which in turn lessens the possibility of provoking an allergic reaction.

Because of their thin, light coats that make them sensitive to low temperatures, Cornish Rexes are best suited for indoor living.


Get NomNomNow!

You’ve decided to open your home to a little kitty. And why not? Cats are playful and cute, and they don’t require as much maintenance as dogs.

But there are things future cat owners need to consider before bringing little Fluffy home. Being a pet parent is a large commitment that requires time, effort and a lot of love. You also need to be make certain being around your new feline friend won’t own you rushing to the emergency room in search of an epipen.

Pet allergies are extremely common — between 5 and 10 percent of the population suffers from allergic reactions after being exposed to household pets.

According to theAsthma and Allergy Foundation of America(AAFA), cat allergies are about two times more common than those caused by dogs. That’s because dog allergens don’t stay airborne as endless as cats’ do, according to LiveScience.com.

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Unfortunately, that also means a lot of animals — numerous of them cats — become homeless.

About 11 percent of cats finish up back in shelters because their owners are allergic, according to the ASPCA.

With 3.4 million cats in shelters across the country each year, that’s about 374,000 felines surrendered because of allergies. And that number doesn’t include cats dumped out on the highway each day.

FEL-D1
There is a lot of confusion and misinformation about what exactly causes an allergic reaction to cats.

Most people believe what they’re allergic to is cat hair — which isn’t necessarily true. The genuine culprits are the kitty’s saliva, tears, urine and dander — those dried flakes of skin that drop off. When a cat grooms itself or goes to the potty, it releases Fel-d1, a feline allergen, into the air, and onto its skin and hair.

An allergic reaction happens when someone with a cat allergy breathes the air or comes into contact with protein-laden hair or dander.

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Some of the symptoms of cat allergies include coughing and wheezing, hives or rashes, red, itchy eyes, runny noses, and sneezing. It can take anywhere from a few minutes to hours for symptoms to appear.

All cats produce the allergen, so there isn’t a truly hypoallergenic cat. Male cats produce the most allergens, and those who are intact make more allergens than neutered males, according to PetFinder.com.

Some breeds can be more problematic for allergy sufferers than others.

What breed of cat causes least allergies

Cats with darker coats tend to give off more allergens. And allergy sufferers should stay away from short-haired cats since their coats don’t hold the protein against their skin love long-haired cats, EverydayHealth.com suggests.

«HYPOALLERGENIC» CATS
There may be relief for people who suffer from allergies but still love cats.

Even though it hasn’t been medically or scientifically proven yet, there are cats that may be considered hypoallergenic, which means they are unlikely to cause an allergic reaction.

The Balinese, the Bengal and the Burmese are every breeds that produce low levels of allergens.

But the consensus is the Siberian is best suited for people with cat allergies.

It’s believed the breed may own low levels of these allergens or proteins, according to Siberian Research’swebsite.

What breed of cat causes least allergies

About 50 percent of Siberians are said to own levels lower than normal cats, the group’s research showed, while about 15 percent of the breed produces extremely low levels and could be placed with people who own severe or dangerous reactions to cats.

Erica Rice said she and her husband adopted a Siberian kitten after they discovered their 2-year-old daughter Brianna couldn’t live with cats.

Erica Rice’s daughter Brianna, 2, plays with the family’s Siberian kitten, Duncan.

What breed of cat causes least allergies

Rice said her family adopted Duncan because the breed is considered one of the best for people with allergies.
Photo credit: Erica Rice

«We had a cat before she was born,» Rice said. «But she started getting runny noses and we weren’t capable to figure out why.»

After getting Brianna tested, their doctor sure she had allergies.

When their cat died, the family didn’t desire to get another one because of the potential health risks to Brianna.

«She also has cystic fibrosis, and we didn’t desire to take any risks.

There’s a higher risk of her getting infected because of her allergies,» she added.

Rice said because Brianna loves animals, her husband did some research online and contacted Siberian breeder Kate Stryker about adopting a kitten. Stryker runs ForestWind Siberian Cat Breederin Buffalo, New York, and has been breeding Siberians since 2005.

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«About 80 percent of our buyers are cat allergic or asthmatic or both,» said Stryker, who also happens to be highly allergic to cats.

Stryker said she gives potential adopters questionnaires, asking them detailed questions: whether anyone in the household has allergies, if they’ve had allergy shots and about the types of reactions and symptoms.

Once every the information is collected, she invites potential adopters to spend time with the felines — to ensure the cat is a excellent fit and so the animal won’t be surrendered because of allergies.

«I am extremely aware of the necessity to take a slow beat and to consider every of the various factors that go into making a successful kitten placement into a cat allergic or asthmatic home,» she said.

According to Rice, Brianna and Duncan — now 23 weeks ancient — are inseparable, and the 2-year-old hasn’t had an allergic reaction since they brought him home.

«All around, he’s just awesome,» she said.

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BALANCING CAT OWNERSHIP WITH ALLERGIES
Because purebred cats can often come at a high cost, potential adopters can still consider shelter cats with some medical intervention.

Cat allergies can be controlled with over-the-counter allergy medication — antihistamines and decongestants or nasal sprays.

WebMD.com also recommends allergy shots, which own been known to make a large difference in some allergy sufferers.

The AAFA also suggests some lifestyle tips to assist allergy sufferers minimize reactions while keeping kitty happy at home:

  1. Keep pets out of the bedroom and change clothing after prolonged exposure to an animal.
  2. Using air cleaners with a HEPA filter can assist remove pet allergens from the air.
  3. Although it may only be a nominal decrease, bathing a pet regularly can reduce the number of airborne allergens.
  4. Allergens love to settle into deep carpeting, which can make allergies worse.

    What breed of cat causes least allergies

    Ponder about getting rid of carpeting and sticking with a bare floor.

  5. And it may go without saying, but remember to hold kitty’s litter box clean.

Fel d 1 is a protein that in cats is encoded by the CH1 (chain 1/Fel d 1-A) and CH2 (chain 2/Fel d 1-B) genes.[2][3]

Fel d 1, produced largely in catsaliva and sebaceous glands, is the primary allergen present on cats and kittens.[1] Fel d 1 is also produced by cat skin itself.[4] The protein is of an unknown function to the animal but causes an IgG or IgE reaction in sensitive humans (either as an allergic or asthmatic response).

Kittens produce less Fel d 1 than adult cats. Female cats produce a lower level of Fel d 1 than (unneutered) males.[5], while neutered males produce levels similar to those of females; both intact and spayed females produce similar levels.

Even though females and neutered males produce Fel d 1 in lower levels, they still produce enough to cause allergic symptoms in sensitive individuals. Removal of soft surfaces in the home (carpet, furniture), frequent washings of bed linens, HEPA filters and even washing cats has been proven to reduce the amounts of Fel d 1 present in the home[citation needed].

Researchers own been investigating reports from cat owners that certain breeds of cats either do not produce Fel d 1 or do so at significantly lower levels than other breeds. For instance, individual Siberian cats from naturally occurring breed native to the Siberian region for which it is named, own been shown to own genetic variants that result in a lower production of Fel d 1.[6] Another breed thought to own a possible genetic disposition not to produce this allergen or to produce less is the Balinese, an offshoot of the Siamese breed.[7] Research continues, hampered by the lack of a dependable genetic test for Fel d 1 production.

A variant of Fel-D1 is present in the venom of the slow loris (Primate: Nycticebus). Slow lorises are one of only a few venomous mammals and the only known venomous primate, possessing a dual-composite venom of saliva and brachial gland exudate (BGE).[8] The BGE possesses a protein resembling Fel-D1, which may affect host species as an allergen as a constituent of the venom, and possess a communicative function.


What Causes Cat Allergies?

Allergies are the immune system’s abnormal response to otherwise harmless substances called allergens. A person with cat allergies has a hypersensitive immune system that triggers a reaction when the body comes in contact with, or proximity to, cats.

While numerous people ponder that a cat’s fur is the primary allergen, this is actually a widespread misconception.

According to theAmerican College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, the allergic potential of cats is not driven by their fur, but rather by the presence of a protein (Fel d 1) in the animal’s saliva, dander, and urine. Although the fur itself is not an allergen, it can collect saliva, dander, and urine in addition to other allergens love dust and pollen, which means that cats with less fur may be less likely to collect allergens and easier to hold clean.

One of the reasons cat allergies are so common is that thesize and shape of the Fel d 1 proteinmolecule conducive to remaining airborne for endless periods of time, subsequently sticking to fur, carpets, fabrics, and other surfaces.

This is why highly sensitive people can experience cat allergies even when an animal isn’t present. Research has shown that cat allergens can even appear inrelatively high concentrations in public placeswithout cats, such as schools and libraries.


References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Pfam and InterPro: IPR015332

  • ^Sex difference in Fel d 1 allergen production. http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(96)70238-5/fulltext . Accessed 31 Oct 2016.
  • ^Morgenstern JP, Griffith IJ, Brauer AW, Rogers BL, Bond JF, Chapman MD, Kuo MC (November 1991).

    «Amino acid sequence of Fel dI, the major allergen of the domestic cat: protein sequence analysis and cDNA cloning». Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88 (21): 9690–4. Bibcode:1991PNAS…88.9690M. doi:10.1073/pnas.88.21.9690. PMC 52784. PMID 1946388.

  • ^Sartore, Stefano; Landoni, Eleonora; Maione, Sandra; Tarducci, Alberto; Borrelli, Antonio; Soglia, Dominga; Rasero, Roberto; Sacchi, Paola (2017-12-01). «Polymorphism Analysis of Ch1 and Ch2 Genes in the Siberian Cat». Veterinary Sciences. 4 (4): 63. doi:10.3390/vetsci4040063. PMC 5753643. PMID 29194349.
  • ^«Allergy to Cats — Cat DNA Test Kit | Basepaws».

    Allergy to Cats — Cat DNA Test Kit | Basepaws. Retrieved 2018-08-07.

  • ^DABROWSKI, A; VANDERBREMPT, X; SOLER, M; SEGURET, N; LUCCIANI, P; CHARPIN, D; VERVLOET, D (1990). «Cat skin as an significant source of Fel d I allergen». Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 86 (4): 462–465. doi:10.1016/S0091-6749(05)80200-3. PMID 2229808.
  • ^Griffith IJ, Craig S, Pollock J, Yu XB, Morgenstern JP, Rogers BL (April 1992). «Expression and genomic structure of the genes encoding FdI, the major allergen from the domestic cat». Gene. 113 (2): 263–8. doi:10.1016/0378-1119(92)90405-E. PMID 1572548.
  • ^ abcdPDB: 1PUO​; Kaiser L, Grönlund H, Sandalova T, Ljunggren HG, van Hage-Hamsten M, Achour A, Schneider G (September 2003).

    «The crystal structure of the major cat allergen Fel d 1, a member of the secretoglobin family». J. Biol. Chem. 278 (39): 37730–5. doi:10.1074/jbc.M304740200. PMID 12851385.

  • ^Nekaris, K. Anne-Isola; Moore, Richard S.; Rode, E. Johanna; Fry, Bryan G. (2013-09-27). «Mad, bad and dangerous to know: the biochemistry, ecology and evolution of slow loris venom». Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins Including Tropical Diseases. 19 (1): 21. doi:10.1186/1678-9199-19-21. ISSN 1678-9199. PMC 3852360. PMID 24074353.

Allergies to cats are one of the most common allergies among individuals.

Among the eight known cat allergens, the most prominent allergen is secretoglobinFel d 1, and it is produced in the anal glands, salivary glands, and, mainly, in sebaceous glands of cats, and is ubiquitous in the United States, even in households without cats.[1] Allergic symptoms associated with cats include coughing, wheezing, chest tightening, itching, nasal congestion, rash, watering eyes, sneezing, chapped lips, and similar symptoms.

In worst case scenarios, allergies to cats can develop into more life-threatening conditions such as rhinitis and mild to severe forms of asthma.[1] Despite these symptoms, there are numerous types of solutions to mitigate the allergic effects of cats, including medications, vaccines, and home remedies. Hypoallergenic cats are another solution for individuals who desire to pets without the allergic consequences. Furthermore, prospective pet owners can reduce allergic reactions by selecting cats of a specific gender or color, which are associated with a lower production of allergens.

Allergies to cats are one of the most common allergies among individuals.

What breed of cat causes least allergies

Among the eight known cat allergens, the most prominent allergen is secretoglobinFel d 1, and it is produced in the anal glands, salivary glands, and, mainly, in sebaceous glands of cats, and is ubiquitous in the United States, even in households without cats.[1] Allergic symptoms associated with cats include coughing, wheezing, chest tightening, itching, nasal congestion, rash, watering eyes, sneezing, chapped lips, and similar symptoms. In worst case scenarios, allergies to cats can develop into more life-threatening conditions such as rhinitis and mild to severe forms of asthma.[1] Despite these symptoms, there are numerous types of solutions to mitigate the allergic effects of cats, including medications, vaccines, and home remedies.

Hypoallergenic cats are another solution for individuals who desire to pets without the allergic consequences. Furthermore, prospective pet owners can reduce allergic reactions by selecting cats of a specific gender or color, which are associated with a lower production of allergens.


Cat allergens

Eight cat allergens own been recognized by the World Health Organization/International Union of Immunological Societies (WHO/IUIS) Allergen Nomenclature Sub‐Committee.

Fel d 1 is the most prominent cat allergen, accounting for 96% of human cat allergies.[2] The remaining cat allergens are Fel d 2-8, with Fel d 4, an urinary protein, occurring the most in humans among the other seven allergens. Every cats produce Fel d 1 including hypoallergenic cats. The main way these allergens are spread is through a cat’s saliva or dander, which gets stuck on clothing. A study found that 63% of people allergic to cats own antibodies against Fel d 4.[3]

Fel d 1

Fel d 1 is the most dominant cat allergen.

It is part of the secretoglobulin family, which are proteins found only in mammals. Fel d 1 is primarily secreted through the sebaceous glands and can be found on the skin and fur of a cat. It is less commonly secreted through the salivary gland, lacrimal glands, skin and anal glands.[4]

Fel d 4 and Fel d 7

Fel d 4 and Fel d 7 are cat lipocalins.

What breed of cat causes least allergies

Fel d 4 and Fel d 7 are one of the most common cat allergens after Fel d 1. Fel d 4 is primarily found in cats’ saliva and is associated with atopic dermatitis in children with cat allergies.[4]


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