What are symptoms of mold allergies

  • Alternaria: Commonly found in your nose, mouth, and upper respiratory tract; can cause allergic responses.
  • Aspergillus: Generally found in warm, extremely damp climates, and a common occupant of home dust; produces mycotoxins; can cause lung infections.
  • Penicillium: Extremely common species found on wallpaper, decaying fabrics, carpet, and fiberglass duct insulation; known for causing allergies and asthma; some species produce mycotoxins, one being the common antibiotic penicillin.
  • Cladosporium: This extremely common outdoor fungus can discover its way indoors to grow on textiles, wood, and other damp, porous materials; triggers hay fever and asthma symptoms.
  • Stachybotrys: Extremely toxic “black mold” that produces mycotoxins that can cause serious breathing difficulties and bleeding of the lungs, among other health problems.

    Thankfully, less common in homes than the other four, but not rare; found on wood or paper (cellulose products), but NOT on concrete, linoleum or tile.

Mold illness is the variety of health problems that can happen from any type of mold exposure. Although a mold allergy is the most common problem caused by exposure to mold, mold can cause illness without an allergic reaction. Mold can also cause infections or irritants and toxic reactions. Infections caused by mold can lead to a variety of problems from flu-like symptoms to skin infections and even pneumonia. (Mayo Clinic)

Click here for more on allergies.

Mold toxicity is also an issue, and it is considered a Chronic Inflammatory Response!

An acute and chronic, systemic inflammatory response acquired following exposure to the interior environment of a water-damaged building with resident toxigenic organisms, including, but not limited to fungi, bacteria, actinomycetes, and Mycobacterium serve as inflammogens!

Inflammogens hold your body in a state of inflammation.

Mold illness is the variety of health problems that can happen from any type of mold exposure. Although a mold allergy is the most common problem caused by exposure to mold, mold can cause illness without an allergic reaction. Mold can also cause infections or irritants and toxic reactions. Infections caused by mold can lead to a variety of problems from flu-like symptoms to skin infections and even pneumonia. (Mayo Clinic)

Click here for more on allergies.

Mold toxicity is also an issue, and it is considered a Chronic Inflammatory Response!

An acute and chronic, systemic inflammatory response acquired following exposure to the interior environment of a water-damaged building with resident toxigenic organisms, including, but not limited to fungi, bacteria, actinomycetes, and Mycobacterium serve as inflammogens!

Inflammogens hold your body in a state of inflammation.


Different Types of Mold

Allergenic Molds. Allergenic molds are on the low finish of the harm scale. They only cause problems for those with asthma and a predisposed allergy to the specific mold. Children are more likely to own mold allergies than adults.

Pathogenic Molds. Pathogenic molds will cause some infection. This is a large problem for those with a suppressed immune system.

What are symptoms of mold allergies

An acute response resembling bacterial pneumonia is commonly found with those exposed to these types of mold.

Toxigenic Molds. As the name implies, these molds produce mycotoxins that can cause serious health effects. They own been tied to immunosuppression and cancer. The toxic chemicals found in these types of molds can be absorbed into the body when one inhales them, eats them, or even touches them.


Pollen count

How do scientists know how much pollen is in the air? They set a trap. The trap — generally a glass plate or rod coated with adhesive — is analyzed every few hours, and the number of particles collected is then averaged to reflect the particles that would pass through the area in any 24-hour period.

That measurement is converted to pollen per cubic meter. Mold counts work much the same way.

A pollen count is an imprecise measurement, scientists confess, and an arduous one — at the analysis stage, pollen grains are counted one by one under a microscope. It is also highly time-consuming to discern between types of pollen, so they are generally bundled into one variable. Given the imprecise nature of the measurement, entire daily pollen counts are often reported simply as low, moderate or high.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology provides up-to-date pollen counts for U.S.

states.


Common allergens

The most common allergen is pollen, a powder released by trees, grasses and weeds that fertilize the seeds of neighboring plants. As plants rely on the wind to do the work for them, the pollination season sees billions of microscopic particles fill the air, and some of them finish up in people’s noses and mouths.

Spring bloomers include ash, birch, cedar, elm and maple trees, plus numerous species of grass. Weeds pollinate in the tardy summer and drop, with ragweed being the most volatile.

The pollen that sits on brightly colored flowers is rarely responsible for hay fever because it is heavier and falls to the ground rather than becoming airborne.

Bees and other insects carry flower pollen from one flower to the next without ever bothering human noses.

Mold allergies are diverse. Mold is a spore that grows on rotting logs, dead leaves and grasses. While dry-weather mold species exist, numerous types of mold thrive in moist, rainy conditions, and release their spores overnight. During both the spring and drop allergy seasons, pollen is released mainly in the morning hours and travels best on dry, warm and breezy days.


11 Signs of a Mold Illness

  • Tremors and Vertigo
  • Unexplained Muscle Cramping, Aches and Pains in the Joints, Persistent Nerve Pain
  • Increase air flow in your home.

    Open doors between rooms, move furniture away from walls and use fans if needed.

  • Repair roof leaks and roof gutters. Clean out your gutters to remove leaves and debris. When gutters are full or damaged, it can cause leaking.
  • Metallic Taste in the Mouth
  • Temperature Regulation or Night Sweats
  • Outdoor molds may cause allergy symptoms in summer and drop (or year-round in some climates)
  • Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  • Avoid contact with mold. (See tips above)
  • Asthma and Sinus Problems love Cough or Shortness of Breath
  • Promote ground water drainage away from a home.

    Remove leaves and dead vegetation near the foundation and in the rain gutters.

  • Limit your outdoor activities when mold counts are high. This will lessen the quantity of mold spores you inhale and your symptoms.
  • Polyurethane and rubber foams seem especially prone to fungus invasion. Use plastic covers on bedding made from these foams.
  • Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  • Use central air conditioning with a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter attachment. This can assist trap mold spores from your entire home. Freestanding air cleaners only filter air in a limited area.

    Avoid devices that treat air with heat, electrostatic ions or ozone.

  • Wear a dust mask when cutting grass, digging around plants, picking up leaves and disturbing other plant materials.
  • Remove bathroom carpeting from places where it can get wet.
  • Scour sinks and tubs at least monthly. Fungi thrive on soap and other films that jacket tiles and grout.
  • Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  • Don’t leave wet, damp clothes sitting around.
  • Digestive Issues love Change in Appetite, Diarrhea, Nausea, Abdominal Pain
  • Lower your indoor humidity. No air cleaners will assist if excess moisture remains.

    If indoor humidity is above 50%, fungi will thrive. A hygrometer is a tool used to measure humidity. The goal is to hold humidity under 45%, but under 35% is better.

    If you own to use a humidifier, clean the fluid reservoir at least twice a week to prevent mold growth. Air conditioners and dehumidifiers can also be a source of mold.

  • Numbness and Tingling
  • Excessive Thirst and Increased Urination
  • Use an electric dehumidifier to remove moisture and hold humidity in your home under 45 percent. Drain the dehumidifier regularly and clean the condensation coils and collection bucket.
  • Brain Fog, Memory Problems, Trouble Focusing, Headaches
  • Eye Problems love Red Eyes or Light Sensitivity
  • Remove clothes from washing machine promptly.
  • Prevent mold and mildew build up inside the home.

    Pay shut attention to mold in bathrooms, basements and laundry areas. Be aggressive about reducing dampness.

  • Clean trash pails frequently.
  • Improve air flow through your bedroom. If your closet is colder than the relax of your room, leave the closet doors open.
  • Use an exhaust fan or open a window in the bathroom during baths and showers.
  • Throw away or recycle ancient books, newspapers, clothing or bedding.
  • Clean refrigerator door gaskets and drip pans.
  • Indoor molds may cause allergy symptoms year-round
  • Make certain your laundry area has excellent air circulation.
  • Use an exhaust fan when you are cooking or washing dishes.
  • If you own a front-loading washing machine, clean the rubber seal and inside of the door.

    Leave the door cracked open when the machine is not in use.

  • Check windows for condensation (water droplets or mist).
  • Fatigue and Weakness
  • Take medications for nasal or other allergic symptoms. Antihistamines and nasal steroids are available over the counter without a prescription. If you own allergic asthma, talk to your doctor about which medicines may be best for you. You might also be a candidate for allergy shots. Allergy shots may assist reduce symptoms and medications.

    Study more about allergy treatments.

You can see the variety of symptoms are fairly large and can overlap with other conditions. See a practitioner if you own the underlying conditions that may go along with mold and mold toxicity. It’s not always the food we eat, but it can be the air that we breathe that makes us sick.

Mold Allergy

What Is a Mold Allergy?

If you own an allergy that occurs over several seasons, you may be allergic to the spores of molds or other fungi.

Molds live everywhere. Upsetting a mold source can send the spores into the air.

Mold and mildew are fungi. They are diverse from plants or animals in how they reproduce and grow. The “seeds,” called spores, travel through the air. Some spores spread in dry, windy weather. Others spread with the fog or dew when humidity is high.

Inhaling the spores causes allergic reactions in some people. Allergic symptoms from fungus spores are most common from July to early drop.

But fungi grow in numerous places, both indoors and exterior, so allergic reactions can happen year round.

Although there are numerous types of molds, only a few dozen cause allergic reactions. Numerous molds grow on rotting logs and fallen leaves, in compost piles and on grasses and grains. Unlike pollens, molds do not die with the first killing frost. Most outdoor molds become inactive during the winter. In the spring they grow on plants killed by the freezing.

Indoors, fungi grow in damp areas. They can often be found in the bathroom, kitchen or basement.

What Are the Symptoms of a Mold Allergy?

The symptoms of mold allergy are extremely similar to the symptoms of other allergies, such as sneezing, itching, runny nose, congestion and dry, scaling skin.

  1. Outdoor molds may cause allergy symptoms in summer and drop (or year-round in some climates)
  2. Indoor molds may cause allergy symptoms year-round

Mold spores get into your nose and cause hay fever symptoms. They also can reach the lungs and trigger asthma. A chemical released by allergy cells in the nose and or lungs causes the symptoms.

Sometimes the reaction happens correct away. Sometimes a mold allergy can cause delayed symptoms, leading to nasal congestion or worsening asthma over time. Symptoms often get worse in a damp or moldy room love a basement. This may mean you own a mold allergy.

Rarely, some patients can own a more serious illness called allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. In this condition, there is both an allergic and an inflammatory response to the mold. Symptoms may include severe wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath, much love asthma.

Food fungi, love mushrooms, dried fruit, or foods containing yeast, vinegar or soy sauce, generally don’t cause allergy symptoms of the nose, eyes and lungs.

It is more likely that reactions to food fungi are caused by the food’s direct effect on blood vessels. For example, fermented foods (like wine) may naturally contain a substance known as histamine. Histamine is also a chemical your allergy cells release during an allergic reaction. Foods that contain histamines can trigger allergy-like responses when you consume them.

How Can I Prevent an Allergic Reaction to Mold?

There is no cure for allergies. But you can reduce your allergy symptoms by avoiding contact with the mold spores. Several measures will help:

Reduce Your Exposure to Mold Spores Outside

  1. Limit your outdoor activities when mold counts are high.

    This will lessen the quantity of mold spores you inhale and your symptoms.

  2. Wear a dust mask when cutting grass, digging around plants, picking up leaves and disturbing other plant materials.

Reduce Your Exposure to Mold Spores Inside

  1. Use central air conditioning with a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter attachment. This can assist trap mold spores from your entire home. Freestanding air cleaners only filter air in a limited area. Avoid devices that treat air with heat, electrostatic ions or ozone.
  2. Lower your indoor humidity. No air cleaners will assist if excess moisture remains.

    If indoor humidity is above 50%, fungi will thrive. A hygrometer is a tool used to measure humidity. The goal is to hold humidity under 45%, but under 35% is better.

    If you own to use a humidifier, clean the fluid reservoir at least twice a week to prevent mold growth. Air conditioners and dehumidifiers can also be a source of mold.

  3. Prevent mold and mildew build up inside the home. Pay shut attention to mold in bathrooms, basements and laundry areas. Be aggressive about reducing dampness.

To Reduce Mold in Your Bathrooms:

  1. Use an exhaust fan or open a window in the bathroom during baths and showers.
  2. Remove bathroom carpeting from places where it can get wet.
  3. Scour sinks and tubs at least monthly.

    Fungi thrive on soap and other films that jacket tiles and grout.

  4. Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.

To Reduce Mold in Your Kitchen:

  1. Clean trash pails frequently.
  2. Clean refrigerator door gaskets and drip pans.
  3. Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  4. Use an exhaust fan when you are cooking or washing dishes.

To Reduce Mold in Your Laundry Area:

  1. Remove clothes from washing machine promptly.
  2. If you own a front-loading washing machine, clean the rubber seal and inside of the door. Leave the door cracked open when the machine is not in use.
  3. Don’t leave wet, damp clothes sitting around.
  4. Make certain your laundry area has excellent air circulation.

To Reduce Mold in Your Bedrooms:

  1. Polyurethane and rubber foams seem especially prone to fungus invasion.

    Use plastic covers on bedding made from these foams.

  2. Throw away or recycle ancient books, newspapers, clothing or bedding.
  3. Check windows for condensation (water droplets or mist).
  4. Improve air flow through your bedroom. If your closet is colder than the relax of your room, leave the closet doors open.

To Reduce Mold in Your Basement:

  1. Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  2. Promote ground water drainage away from a home. Remove leaves and dead vegetation near the foundation and in the rain gutters.

To Reduce Mold in Your Whole House:

  1. Use an electric dehumidifier to remove moisture and hold humidity in your home under 45 percent.

    Drain the dehumidifier regularly and clean the condensation coils and collection bucket.

  2. Increase air flow in your home. Open doors between rooms, move furniture away from walls and use fans if needed.
  3. Repair roof leaks and roof gutters. Clean out your gutters to remove leaves and debris. When gutters are full or damaged, it can cause leaking.

How Do Doctors Diagnose Mold Allergy?

To diagnose an allergy to mold or fungi, the doctor will take a finish medical history. If they suspect a mold allergy, the doctor often will do skin tests or allergen specific IgE blood tests.

Extracts of diverse types of fungi may be used to scratch or prick the skin. If there is no reaction, then you probably don’t own an allergy. The doctor uses the patient’s medical history, the skin testing results and the physical exam to diagnose a mold allergy.

What Are the Treatments for Mold Allergy?

In some cases, there may be ways to reduce or remove mold exposure.

What are symptoms of mold allergies

This may not always be possible and you may need medications.

  1. Avoid contact with mold. (See tips above)
  2. Take medications for nasal or other allergic symptoms. Antihistamines and nasal steroids are available over the counter without a prescription. If you own allergic asthma, talk to your doctor about which medicines may be best for you. You might also be a candidate for allergy shots. Allergy shots may assist reduce symptoms and medications. Study more about allergy treatments.

Medical Review October 2015.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop.

Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition.

More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN).

Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states. Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S. [Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]

You can see the variety of symptoms are fairly large and can overlap with other conditions.

See a practitioner if you own the underlying conditions that may go along with mold and mold toxicity. It’s not always the food we eat, but it can be the air that we breathe that makes us sick.

Mold Allergy

What Is a Mold Allergy?

If you own an allergy that occurs over several seasons, you may be allergic to the spores of molds or other fungi. Molds live everywhere. Upsetting a mold source can send the spores into the air.

Mold and mildew are fungi.

What are symptoms of mold allergies

They are diverse from plants or animals in how they reproduce and grow. The “seeds,” called spores, travel through the air. Some spores spread in dry, windy weather. Others spread with the fog or dew when humidity is high.

Inhaling the spores causes allergic reactions in some people. Allergic symptoms from fungus spores are most common from July to early drop. But fungi grow in numerous places, both indoors and exterior, so allergic reactions can happen year round.

Although there are numerous types of molds, only a few dozen cause allergic reactions.

Numerous molds grow on rotting logs and fallen leaves, in compost piles and on grasses and grains. Unlike pollens, molds do not die with the first killing frost. Most outdoor molds become inactive during the winter. In the spring they grow on plants killed by the freezing. Indoors, fungi grow in damp areas. They can often be found in the bathroom, kitchen or basement.

What Are the Symptoms of a Mold Allergy?

The symptoms of mold allergy are extremely similar to the symptoms of other allergies, such as sneezing, itching, runny nose, congestion and dry, scaling skin.

  1. Outdoor molds may cause allergy symptoms in summer and drop (or year-round in some climates)
  2. Indoor molds may cause allergy symptoms year-round

Mold spores get into your nose and cause hay fever symptoms.

They also can reach the lungs and trigger asthma. A chemical released by allergy cells in the nose and or lungs causes the symptoms. Sometimes the reaction happens correct away. Sometimes a mold allergy can cause delayed symptoms, leading to nasal congestion or worsening asthma over time. Symptoms often get worse in a damp or moldy room love a basement. This may mean you own a mold allergy.

Rarely, some patients can own a more serious illness called allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. In this condition, there is both an allergic and an inflammatory response to the mold. Symptoms may include severe wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath, much love asthma.

Food fungi, love mushrooms, dried fruit, or foods containing yeast, vinegar or soy sauce, generally don’t cause allergy symptoms of the nose, eyes and lungs.

It is more likely that reactions to food fungi are caused by the food’s direct effect on blood vessels. For example, fermented foods (like wine) may naturally contain a substance known as histamine. Histamine is also a chemical your allergy cells release during an allergic reaction. Foods that contain histamines can trigger allergy-like responses when you consume them.

How Can I Prevent an Allergic Reaction to Mold?

There is no cure for allergies.

But you can reduce your allergy symptoms by avoiding contact with the mold spores. Several measures will help:

Reduce Your Exposure to Mold Spores Outside

  1. Limit your outdoor activities when mold counts are high. This will lessen the quantity of mold spores you inhale and your symptoms.
  2. Wear a dust mask when cutting grass, digging around plants, picking up leaves and disturbing other plant materials.

Reduce Your Exposure to Mold Spores Inside

  1. Use central air conditioning with a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter attachment. This can assist trap mold spores from your entire home.

    Freestanding air cleaners only filter air in a limited area. Avoid devices that treat air with heat, electrostatic ions or ozone.

  2. Lower your indoor humidity. No air cleaners will assist if excess moisture remains. If indoor humidity is above 50%, fungi will thrive. A hygrometer is a tool used to measure humidity. The goal is to hold humidity under 45%, but under 35% is better.

    If you own to use a humidifier, clean the fluid reservoir at least twice a week to prevent mold growth.

    What are symptoms of mold allergies

    Air conditioners and dehumidifiers can also be a source of mold.

  3. Prevent mold and mildew build up inside the home. Pay shut attention to mold in bathrooms, basements and laundry areas. Be aggressive about reducing dampness.

To Reduce Mold in Your Bathrooms:

  1. Use an exhaust fan or open a window in the bathroom during baths and showers.
  2. Remove bathroom carpeting from places where it can get wet.
  3. Scour sinks and tubs at least monthly. Fungi thrive on soap and other films that jacket tiles and grout.
  4. Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.

To Reduce Mold in Your Kitchen:

  1. Clean trash pails frequently.
  2. Clean refrigerator door gaskets and drip pans.
  3. Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  4. Use an exhaust fan when you are cooking or washing dishes.

To Reduce Mold in Your Laundry Area:

  1. Remove clothes from washing machine promptly.
  2. If you own a front-loading washing machine, clean the rubber seal and inside of the door.

    Leave the door cracked open when the machine is not in use.

  3. Don’t leave wet, damp clothes sitting around.
  4. Make certain your laundry area has excellent air circulation.

To Reduce Mold in Your Bedrooms:

  1. Polyurethane and rubber foams seem especially prone to fungus invasion. Use plastic covers on bedding made from these foams.
  2. Throw away or recycle ancient books, newspapers, clothing or bedding.
  3. Check windows for condensation (water droplets or mist).
  4. Improve air flow through your bedroom.

    If your closet is colder than the relax of your room, leave the closet doors open.

To Reduce Mold in Your Basement:

  1. Quickly repair any plumbing leaks.
  2. Promote ground water drainage away from a home. Remove leaves and dead vegetation near the foundation and in the rain gutters.

To Reduce Mold in Your Whole House:

  1. Use an electric dehumidifier to remove moisture and hold humidity in your home under 45 percent.

    Drain the dehumidifier regularly and clean the condensation coils and collection bucket.

  2. Increase air flow in your home. Open doors between rooms, move furniture away from walls and use fans if needed.
  3. Repair roof leaks and roof gutters. Clean out your gutters to remove leaves and debris. When gutters are full or damaged, it can cause leaking.

How Do Doctors Diagnose Mold Allergy?

To diagnose an allergy to mold or fungi, the doctor will take a finish medical history.

If they suspect a mold allergy, the doctor often will do skin tests or allergen specific IgE blood tests. Extracts of diverse types of fungi may be used to scratch or prick the skin. If there is no reaction, then you probably don’t own an allergy. The doctor uses the patient’s medical history, the skin testing results and the physical exam to diagnose a mold allergy.

What Are the Treatments for Mold Allergy?

In some cases, there may be ways to reduce or remove mold exposure. This may not always be possible and you may need medications.

  1. Avoid contact with mold. (See tips above)
  2. Take medications for nasal or other allergic symptoms. Antihistamines and nasal steroids are available over the counter without a prescription.

    If you own allergic asthma, talk to your doctor about which medicines may be best for you. You might also be a candidate for allergy shots. Allergy shots may assist reduce symptoms and medications. Study more about allergy treatments.

Medical Review October 2015.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop.

Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition. More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

What are symptoms of mold allergies

Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN). Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states.

Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S. [Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]


Symptoms

The symptoms of allergic rhinitis may at first feel love those of a freezing. But unlike a freezing that may incubate before causing discomfort, symptoms of allergies generally appear almost as soon as a person encounters an allergen, such as pollen or mold.

Symptoms include itchy eyes, ears, nose or throat, sneezing, irritability, nasal congestion and hoarseness.

People may also experience cough, postnasal drip, sinus pressure or headaches, decreased sense of smell, snoring, sleep apnea, fatigue and asthma, Josephson said. [Oral Allergy Syndrome: 6 Ways to Avoid an Itchy, Tingling Mouth]

Many of these symptoms are the immune system’s overreaction as it attempts to protect the vital and sensitive respiratory system from exterior invaders. The antibodies produced by the body hold the foreign invaders out, but also cause the symptoms characteristic of allergic responses.

People can develop hay fever at any age, but most people are diagnosed with the disorder in childhood or early adulthood, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Symptoms typically become less severe as people age.

Often, children may first experience food allergies and eczema, or itchy skin, before developing hay fever, Josephson said. «This then worsens over the years, and patients then develop allergies to indoor allergens love dust and animals, or seasonal rhinitis, love ragweed, grass pollen, molds and tree pollen.»

Hay fever can also lead to other medical conditions.

People who are allergic to weeds are more likely to get other allergies and develop asthma as they age, Josephson said.

What are symptoms of mold allergies

But those who get immunotherapy, such as allergy shots that assist people’s bodies get used to allergens, are less likely to develop asthma, he said.


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