What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

To make certain that this is the correct treatment for you (or your child), before you (or they) start taking loratadine it is significant that you discuss the treatment with a doctor or pharmacist if:

  1. You/they are pregnant, trying for a baby or breastfeeding.
  2. You/they are taking or using any other medicines. This includes any medicines being taken which are available to purchase without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  3. You/they own a rare inherited blood disorder called porphyria.
  4. You/they own any liver problems. If so, the recommended dose may need to be reduced.
  5. You/they own ever had an allergic reaction to another antihistamine, or to any other medicine.



Get advice first

Although you can purchase numerous hay fever medicines over the counter, it’s best to get advice from a pharmacist or GP before taking any medicine when you’re pregnant.

They’ll assess your symptoms and the benefits of taking a medicine against the risk of any side effects.

To ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high, it helps to:

  1. wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  2. stay indoors whenever possible
  3. keep windows and doors shut as much as possible

If you decide to take hay fever medicine, you’ll generally be advised to attempt a nasal spray or eyedrops first.


How to take loratadine

  • Before starting the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about loratadine dosage, and it will also provide you with a full list of side-effects which could be experienced from taking it.
  • Recommended doses of loratadine are:
    1. For adults and for children aged over 12 years: 10 mg taken once a day.
    2. You can take loratadine either with or without food.

      Some people discover it helps to swallow the tablets with a drink of water.

    3. If you are taking a brand of tablet called Clarityn® Rapide Allergy, these tablets are made to dissolve in your mouth so that you can swallow them without needing a drink of water. Remove the tablet carefully from the wrapper (by peeling off the backing) and put it on your tongue.

      What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

      Permit the tablet to disperse in your mouth, and then swallow.

    4. If you are giving loratadine liquid medicine to a kid, make certain you follow the dosing instructions on the bottle carefully so that you measure out the correct dose for the weight of your child.
    5. For children aged over 2 years and weighing 31 kg or more: 10 mg taken once a day.
    6. For children aged over 2 years and weighing less than 31 kg: 5 mg taken once a day.
    7. If you forget to take a dose, don’t worry, just take the next dose when it is needed and then continue as before.

      Do not take two doses together to make up for a forgotten dose.


    Antihistamine tablets (oral antihistamines)

    Antihistamine tablets can assist relieve itchy eyes, a runny nose and sneezing, but not every types are suitable to take during pregnancy, so always check with a GP beforehand.

    Pharmacists are unlikely to sell antihistamines without a prescription for use in pregnancy because of manufacturers’ restrictions.

    If you cannot use nasal sprays or eyedrops or they do not work for you, a GP may recommend an antihistamine tablet that does not cause drowsiness, such as:

    1. loratadine – this is generally the first choice for pregnant women because of the quantity of safety data available for it
    2. cetirizine – if loratadine is not suitable or does not work for you, a GP may recommend cetirizine, another antihistamine tablet that does not cause drowsiness

    Chlorphenamine is also considered one of the safer antihistamines to take during pregnancy, but because it can cause drowsiness, loratadine and cetirizine are generally the preferred options.

    For information about taking specific medicines in pregnancy, see the bumps (best use of medicines in pregnancy) website.

    More than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    In fact, allergies are the sixth leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S.

    What’s more, pregnancy can sometimes make allergy symptoms worse. Every woman’s body is diverse, and every pregnancy is diverse, so it’s impossible to predict exactly how allergies will affect an individual pregnant woman.

    But in general, pregnant women may experience some of the following symptoms differently from other allergy sufferers:

    1. Pregnancy hormones might cause the inner lining of your nose to swell.

      This causes nasal congestion and a runny nose.

    2. This enhanced congestion makes seasonal allergy symptoms worse.
    3. Severe congestion could lead to poor stress and poor sleep quality.

    If you’re expecting and suffering from symptoms love these, here’s what you need to know about taking allergy medicine while pregnant.


    How to safely treat allergies during pregnancy

    While it would be best to avoid allergens that annoy you, that’s not always a possibility. Numerous pregnant women and their providers prefer to start with a non-pharmaceutical treatment plan whenever possible.

    Dr.

    What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

    Janelle Luk, medical director and co-founder of Generation Next Fertility in New York City, suggests an over-the-counter saline nasal spray.

    Dr. Luk also recommends physical activity to reduce nasal inflammation. In addition, she says patients with a stuffy nose might be capable to sleep better if they elevate the head of the bed by 30 to 45 degrees during sleep.

    However, sometimes those non-pharmaceutical options just don’t do the trick, and you need something stronger (aka allergy medicine) to ease your distress.

    In that case, there are several options that are safe to try.

    “For moderate to severe allergies, your physician may recommend a nonprescription corticosteroid spray or an oral antihistamine,” Dr. Luk says. “Some nasal spray options include Rhinocort Allergy, Flonase, and Nasonex.”

    For oral antihistamines, Staunton says she recommends Claritin (loratadine) or Zyrtec (cetirizine) because of their excellent safety history. Both are rated pregnancy category B by the FDA.

    This means that controlled studies in animals own shown no adverse effects to the developing fetus.

    Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is considered fairly safe during pregnancy, according to the CDC. However, Benadryl Allergy Plus Congestion is not safe for pregnant women because it contains phenylephrine.

    You can also take one of the oral antihistamines together with a nasal spray if neither one controls your symptoms on its own.

    As for subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT), aka allergy shots—if you were on them before pregnancy, your doctor may continue them.

    But they wouldn’t be started during pregnancy because of “the potential harm that could result if a reaction were to occur,” Staunton says.

    If you are suffering from allergy symptoms, speak with your provider about your best options for allergy medicine while pregnant.

    allergyallergy medspregnancy

    If you’re pregnant, you’ve got enough to deal with without being miserable from a stuffed-up nose and itchy eyes whenever the pollen count goes crazy.

    The excellent news is that antihistamines for seasonal allergy symptoms are generally safe during pregnancy. Benadryl and Chlor-Trimeton, for example, are safe.

    We ponder the second-generation allergy medications love Claritin and Zyrtec are also fine for pregnancy. These are attractive for numerous pregnant women because they don’t make you as drowsy during the day. When you’re at the drug store, just make certain to glance for the versions without pseudoephedrine.

    Allergy medications that combine an antihistamine with a decongestant love pseudoephedrine aren’t safe, because they can lift your blood pressure.

    Avoid the Claritin D, the Zyrtec D, and the Allegra D. The D indicates it has pseudoephedrine in it. Get the regular.

    Pseudoephedrine is the same ingredient as in Sudafed. If you’re used to taking Sudafed to relieve sinus pressure when your allergies act up, don’t while you’re pregnant. Regular Sudafed with pseudoephedrine is not okay, and the newer version called Sudafed PE is not okay either. Sudafed PE has a diverse helpful of decongestant called phenylephrine that can decrease the blood flow to your uterus and possibly cause birth defects.

    If you own any questions about medications during pregnancy, don’t hesitate to call for an appointment to make a plan with your provider.

    Americo Fraboni, MD, family medicine provider specializing in OB
    Fairview Clinics – Princeton
    Fairview Clinics – Zimmerman

    To study more:
    Make an appointment with an OB doctor or midwife or book a tour at The Birthplace.

    How to safely treat allergies during pregnancy

    While it would be best to avoid allergens that annoy you, that’s not always a possibility.

    Numerous pregnant women and their providers prefer to start with a non-pharmaceutical treatment plan whenever possible. Dr. Janelle Luk, medical director and co-founder of Generation Next Fertility in New York City, suggests an over-the-counter saline nasal spray.

    Dr. Luk also recommends physical activity to reduce nasal inflammation. In addition, she says patients with a stuffy nose might be capable to sleep better if they elevate the head of the bed by 30 to 45 degrees during sleep.

    However, sometimes those non-pharmaceutical options just don’t do the trick, and you need something stronger (aka allergy medicine) to ease your distress.

    In that case, there are several options that are safe to try.

    “For moderate to severe allergies, your physician may recommend a nonprescription corticosteroid spray or an oral antihistamine,” Dr. Luk says. “Some nasal spray options include Rhinocort Allergy, Flonase, and Nasonex.”

    For oral antihistamines, Staunton says she recommends Claritin (loratadine) or Zyrtec (cetirizine) because of their excellent safety history. Both are rated pregnancy category B by the FDA. This means that controlled studies in animals own shown no adverse effects to the developing fetus.

    Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is considered fairly safe during pregnancy, according to the CDC.

    However, Benadryl Allergy Plus Congestion is not safe for pregnant women because it contains phenylephrine.

    You can also take one of the oral antihistamines together with a nasal spray if neither one controls your symptoms on its own.

    As for subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT), aka allergy shots—if you were on them before pregnancy, your doctor may continue them. But they wouldn’t be started during pregnancy because of “the potential harm that could result if a reaction were to occur,” Staunton says.

    If you are suffering from allergy symptoms, speak with your provider about your best options for allergy medicine while pregnant.

    allergyallergy medspregnancy

    If you’re pregnant, you’ve got enough to deal with without being miserable from a stuffed-up nose and itchy eyes whenever the pollen count goes crazy.

    The excellent news is that antihistamines for seasonal allergy symptoms are generally safe during pregnancy. Benadryl and Chlor-Trimeton, for example, are safe.

    We ponder the second-generation allergy medications love Claritin and Zyrtec are also fine for pregnancy. These are attractive for numerous pregnant women because they don’t make you as drowsy during the day. When you’re at the drug store, just make certain to glance for the versions without pseudoephedrine.

    Allergy medications that combine an antihistamine with a decongestant love pseudoephedrine aren’t safe, because they can lift your blood pressure. Avoid the Claritin D, the Zyrtec D, and the Allegra D.

    The D indicates it has pseudoephedrine in it. Get the regular.

    Pseudoephedrine is the same ingredient as in Sudafed. If you’re used to taking Sudafed to relieve sinus pressure when your allergies act up, don’t while you’re pregnant.

    What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

    Regular Sudafed with pseudoephedrine is not okay, and the newer version called Sudafed PE is not okay either. Sudafed PE has a diverse helpful of decongestant called phenylephrine that can decrease the blood flow to your uterus and possibly cause birth defects.

    If you own any questions about medications during pregnancy, don’t hesitate to call for an appointment to make a plan with your provider.

    Americo Fraboni, MD, family medicine provider specializing in OB
    Fairview Clinics – Princeton
    Fairview Clinics – Zimmerman

    To study more:
    Make an appointment with an OB doctor or midwife or book a tour at The Birthplace.

    What Is Group B Strep?

    Group B Streptococcus (group B strep, GBS) is a type of often found in the urinary tract, digestive system, and reproductive tracts.

    The bacteria come and go from our bodies, so most people who own it don’t know that they do. GBS generally doesn’t cause health problems.

    How Is Group B Strep Diagnosed?

    Pregnant women are routinely tested for GBS tardy in the pregnancy, generally between weeks 35 and 37. The test is simple, inexpensive, and painless.

    What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

    Called a culture, it involves using a large cotton swab to collect samples from the vagina and rectum. These samples are tested in a lab to check for GBS. The results are generally available in 1 to 3 days.

    If a test finds GBS, the lady is said to be "GBS positive." This means only that she has the bacteria in her body — not that she or her baby will become ill from it.

    GBS infection in babies is diagnosed by testing a sample of blood or spinal fluid. But not every babies born to GBS-positive mothers need testing. Most healthy babies are simply watched to see if they own signs of infection.

    How Is Group B Strep Treated?

    Doctors will test a pregnant lady to see if she has GBS.

    If she does, she will get (IV) antibiotics during labor to kill the bacteria. Doctors generally use penicillin, but can give other medicines if a lady is allergic to it.

    It’s best for a lady to get antibiotics for at least 4 hours before delivery. This simple step greatly helps to prevent the spread of GBS to the baby.

    Doctors also might give antibiotics during labor to a pregnant lady if she:

    1. goes into labor prematurely, before being tested for GBS
    2. had a GBS bladder infection during the pregnancy
    3. hasn’t been tested for GBS and has a fever during labor
    4. hasn’t been tested for GBS and her water breaks 18 or more hours before delivery
    5. had a baby before with GBS disease

    Giving antibiotics during labor helps to prevent early-onset GBS disease only.

    The cause of late-onset disease isn’t known, so no method has yet been found to prevent it. Researchers are working to develop a vaccine to prevent GBS infection.

    Babies who get GBS disease are treated with antibiotics. These are started as soon as possible to assist prevent problems. These babies also may need other treatments, love breathing assist and IV fluids.

    What Are the Signs & Symptoms of GBS Disease?

    Newborns and infants with GBS disease might show these signs:

    1. a fever
    2. irritability or fussiness
    3. inactivity or limpness
    4. breathing problems
    5. feeding problems
    6. trouble keeping a healthy body temperature

    Babies with GBS disease can develop serious problems, such as:

    1. pneumonia
    2. Early-onset infections, which happen during the first week of life.

      Babies often own symptoms within 24 hours of birth.

    3. meningitis (infection of the fluid and lining around the brain). Meningitis is more common with late-onset GBS disease and, in some cases, can lead to hearing and vision loss, learning disabilities, seizures, and even death.
    4. sepsis
    5. Late-onset infections, which develop weeks to months after birth. This type of GBS disease is not well understood.

    What Problems Can Group B Strep Cause?

    Health problems from GBS are not common.

    But it can cause illness in some people, such as the elderly and those with some medical conditions. GBS can cause infections in such areas of the body as the blood, lungs, skin, or bones.

    About 1 out of every 4 women own GBS. In pregnant women, GBS can cause infection of the urinary tract, placenta, womb, and amniotic fluid.

    Even if they haven’t had any symptoms of infection, pregnant women can pass the infection to their babies during labor and delivery.

    How Does Group B Strep Affect Babies?

    When women with GBS are treated with antibiotics during labor, most of their babies do not own any problems.

    But some babies can become extremely ill from GBS. Premature babies are more likely to be infected with GBS than full-term babies because their bodies and immune systems are less developed.

    The two types of GBS disease in babies are:

    • Early-onset infections, which happen during the first week of life.

      What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

      Babies often own symptoms within 24 hours of birth.

    • Late-onset infections, which develop weeks to months after birth. This type of GBS disease is not well understood.

    How Can I Assist Prevent Group B Strep Infection?

    Because GBS comes and goes from the body, a lady should own GBS testing during each pregnancy.

    What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

    Women who are GBS-positive and get antibiotics at the correct time during labor do well, and most don’t pass the infection to their babies.

    If you are GBS-positive and start to go into labor, go to the hospital rather than laboring at home. By getting IV antibiotics for at least 4 hours before delivery, you can assist protect your baby against early-onset GBS disease.

    About loratadine

    Type of medicine Antihistamine (non-drowsy)
    Used for Allergies including hay fever and allergic skin rashes
    Also called Clarityn® Allergy; Clarityn® Rapide Allergy; Boots One A Day Allergy Relief; LloydsPharmacy Non-Drowsy Allergy Relief; Numark Non-Drowsy Allergy Relief
    Available as Tablets, orodispersible tablets (which melt in the mouth) and oral liquid medicine

    Loratadine belongs to a group of medicines called antihistamines — it is an anti-allergy medicine.

    It stops the effects of a naturally occurring substance called histamine and this helps to relieve the symptoms of allergies such as hay fever and urticaria.

    Exposure to substances such as pollen, pet fur, home dust or insect bites can cause your body to produce allergic symptoms. Cells in the lining of your nose and eyes release histamine when they come into contact with these substances. This leads to inflammation in your nose and eyes, which produces symptoms such as sneezing and watery eyes.

    Urticaria is a condition where an itchy skin rash develops.

    The rash can be triggered by an allergy to a substance such as a soap or a detergent.

    Loratadine can be prescribed for you by a doctor or dentist, or you can purchase it without a prescription at pharmacies and other retail outlets. Tablet formulations are generally suitable for adults and older children, whereas oral liquid medicine is available for younger children. Loratadine is not suitable for children under 2 years of age.

    How Can I Assist Prevent Group B Strep Infection?

    Because GBS comes and goes from the body, a lady should own GBS testing during each pregnancy.

    Women who are GBS-positive and get antibiotics at the correct time during labor do well, and most don’t pass the infection to their babies.

    If you are GBS-positive and start to go into labor, go to the hospital rather than laboring at home. By getting IV antibiotics for at least 4 hours before delivery, you can assist protect your baby against early-onset GBS disease.

    About loratadine

    Type of medicine Antihistamine (non-drowsy)
    Used for Allergies including hay fever and allergic skin rashes
    Also called Clarityn® Allergy; Clarityn® Rapide Allergy; Boots One A Day Allergy Relief; LloydsPharmacy Non-Drowsy Allergy Relief; Numark Non-Drowsy Allergy Relief
    Available as Tablets, orodispersible tablets (which melt in the mouth) and oral liquid medicine

    Loratadine belongs to a group of medicines called antihistamines — it is an anti-allergy medicine.

    It stops the effects of a naturally occurring substance called histamine and this helps to relieve the symptoms of allergies such as hay fever and urticaria.

    Exposure to substances such as pollen, pet fur, home dust or insect bites can cause your body to produce allergic symptoms. Cells in the lining of your nose and eyes release histamine when they come into contact with these substances. This leads to inflammation in your nose and eyes, which produces symptoms such as sneezing and watery eyes.

    Urticaria is a condition where an itchy skin rash develops.

    The rash can be triggered by an allergy to a substance such as a soap or a detergent.

    Loratadine can be prescribed for you by a doctor or dentist, or you can purchase it without a prescription at pharmacies and other retail outlets. Tablet formulations are generally suitable for adults and older children, whereas oral liquid medicine is available for younger children. Loratadine is not suitable for children under 2 years of age.


    Avoid certain allergy medicine while pregnant

    There are a number of medications that are not safe to take during pregnancy.

    First among them are oral decongestants.

    Oral decongestants are best avoided altogether during the first trimester because of an uncertain risk of several rare birth defects,” says Ciara Staunton, a family nurse practitioner and owner of Staunton Primary Care in Cincinnati. “However, Sudafed (pseudoephedrine), which is locked up behind the pharmacy counter, can be used in the second and third trimesters in women without hypertension.”

    But Staunton warns that Sudafed-PE (phenylephrine), the over-the-counter option, should never be taken during pregnancy.

    It is less effective than pseudoephedrine. But more importantly, its safety for pregnant women is questionable.

    Ms.

    What allergy meds can you take while pregnant

    Staunton also recommends against using any herbal therapies during pregnancy. “In the United States and most other countries, herbal medicines are minimally regulated and not monitored for adverse events.”


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    What allergy meds can you take while pregnant