What allergy do i have quiz

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders. Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

Do you own frequent or intense episodes of:

Sniffling?
Nasal mucus due to allergies is thin and watery, at least at first.
Sniffling is common in “hay fever” and related conditions.

Yes

No

Sneezing?
Allergens cause the release of histamine and other “chemical mediators” which provoke sneezing along with a number of other symptoms.

Yes

No

Runny Nose?
Mucus glands in the nose and sinuses (and in the lungs) increase their secretions in response to allergen exposure.

Yes

No

Stuffy nose?
Histamine and other “chemical mediators” cause dilatation of blood vessels, perceived as “congestion” or stuffiness. Externally, the blood vessel dilatation results in redness.

Yes

No

Itchy Nose?
“Chemical mediators” released in allergic reactions make blood vessels “leaky.” Blood factors that are foreign to surrounding tissues ooze into them, causing itchiness.

Yes

No

Drainage in Throat?
Secretions originating in the sinuses typically drain into the throat. Associated symptoms can include hoarseness and a sensation of a lump in the throat.

Yes

No

Difficulty Breathing?
During a flare-up of asthma, it is more hard to get air out of the lungs than into them. But patients generally cannot distinguish the difference—for them it’s just hard to breathe.

Yes

No

Coughing?
A common symptom of asthma, coughing during the night can be the only symptom of early asthma, particularly in a kid. Sinusitis can also be responsible for chronic cough.

Yes

No

Wheezing?
A whistling noise characteristic of asthma, indicating obstruction of air movement in lungs. Causes include constriction and edema of bronchioles and thick secretions lodged within them.

Yes

No

Watery Eyes?
Results from the release of histamine and other “chemical messengers” of allergy. Can be helpful in that it serves as a protective mechanism to flush the eyes of airborne allergens.

Yes

No

Itchy Eyes?
Responsible mechanism same as citing above under Itchy Nose. Rubbing the eyes with dirty hands is an insidious cause of infection of the delicate tissues of the eyes.

What allergy do i own quiz

Yes

No

Bloodshot Eyes?
Cosmetically disturbing visible evidence of dilatation of blood vessels citing above under Stuffy Nose.

Yes

No

Puffy Eyes?
Swelling of the eyelids and the easily distended tissue beneath the eyes results from fluid entering them as one consequence of leaky blood vessels citing above under Itchy Nose.

Yes

No

Headaches?
Headaches, facial pain, and pain perceived in the upper teeth are common symptoms of sinusitis.

Contrary to common opinion, pain is not always present in sinusitis, especially if it is chronic.

Yes

No

Facial Pain?
Can be caused by abnormal pressure in sinuses due to obstruction of the normal communication between the sinuses and the nose, and from swelling and infection within the sinuses.

Yes

No

Ear Popping?
A common symptom of Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, a frequently overlooked condition resulting from intermittent swelling of passageways between the throat and the middle ear.

Yes

No

Ear Fullness?
A sensation of fullness or stuffiness of the ears, often exacerbated by changes in altitude, can be due to inability to satisfactorily “clear” the ears in Eustachian Tube Dysfunction.

Yes

No

Itchy Ear Canals?
Caused by same mechanism citing above under Itchy Nose. Some allergy sufferers discover itching of ear canals and area between the shoulder blades to be their most frustrating symptoms.

Yes

No

Itchy Palate?
Cause citing under Itchy Nose.

A hard put to scratch in company or without gagging. Patients are sometimes heard clicking their tongue against their palate in an attempt to discover relief.

Yes

No

Hives?
Localized swelling, redness, and itching caused by allergies and numerous other factors. If the swelling goes inward instead of toward the skin surface, the resultant condition is called “angioedema.” 

Yes

No

Count up your number of «yes» answers to see what your allergy probability is:

0-3: Allergies possible but not likely.

If medications assist, you probably own allergies.

You may not need additional treatment.

4-9: Allergies likely.

Medications would probably assist, but you may need additional treatment.

10-14: Allergies extremely probable.

You probably need comprehensive treatment to be comfortable and prevent worsening of your condition.

15-20: Allergies almost certain.

You are probably in harm of experiencing complications of allergy and possibly asthma, and should be on appropriate treatment.

Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

Do you own frequent or intense episodes of:

Sniffling?
Nasal mucus due to allergies is thin and watery, at least at first.
Sniffling is common in “hay fever” and related conditions.

Yes

No

Sneezing?
Allergens cause the release of histamine and other “chemical mediators” which provoke sneezing along with a number of other symptoms.

Yes

No

Runny Nose?
Mucus glands in the nose and sinuses (and in the lungs) increase their secretions in response to allergen exposure.

Yes

No

Stuffy nose?
Histamine and other “chemical mediators” cause dilatation of blood vessels, perceived as “congestion” or stuffiness. Externally, the blood vessel dilatation results in redness.

Yes

No

Itchy Nose?
“Chemical mediators” released in allergic reactions make blood vessels “leaky.” Blood factors that are foreign to surrounding tissues ooze into them, causing itchiness.

Yes

No

Drainage in Throat?
Secretions originating in the sinuses typically drain into the throat. Associated symptoms can include hoarseness and a sensation of a lump in the throat.

Yes

No

Difficulty Breathing?
During a flare-up of asthma, it is more hard to get air out of the lungs than into them. But patients generally cannot distinguish the difference—for them it’s just hard to breathe.

Yes

No

Coughing?
A common symptom of asthma, coughing during the night can be the only symptom of early asthma, particularly in a kid. Sinusitis can also be responsible for chronic cough.

Yes

No

Wheezing?
A whistling noise characteristic of asthma, indicating obstruction of air movement in lungs. Causes include constriction and edema of bronchioles and thick secretions lodged within them.

Yes

No

Watery Eyes?
Results from the release of histamine and other “chemical messengers” of allergy. Can be helpful in that it serves as a protective mechanism to flush the eyes of airborne allergens.

Yes

No

Itchy Eyes?
Responsible mechanism same as citing above under Itchy Nose. Rubbing the eyes with dirty hands is an insidious cause of infection of the delicate tissues of the eyes.

Yes

No

Bloodshot Eyes?
Cosmetically disturbing visible evidence of dilatation of blood vessels citing above under Stuffy Nose.

Yes

No

Puffy Eyes?
Swelling of the eyelids and the easily distended tissue beneath the eyes results from fluid entering them as one consequence of leaky blood vessels citing above under Itchy Nose.

Yes

No

Headaches?
Headaches, facial pain, and pain perceived in the upper teeth are common symptoms of sinusitis. Contrary to common opinion, pain is not always present in sinusitis, especially if it is chronic.

Yes

No

Facial Pain?
Can be caused by abnormal pressure in sinuses due to obstruction of the normal communication between the sinuses and the nose, and from swelling and infection within the sinuses.

Yes

No

Ear Popping?
A common symptom of Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, a frequently overlooked condition resulting from intermittent swelling of passageways between the throat and the middle ear.

Yes

No

Ear Fullness?
A sensation of fullness or stuffiness of the ears, often exacerbated by changes in altitude, can be due to inability to satisfactorily “clear” the ears in Eustachian Tube Dysfunction.

Yes

No

Itchy Ear Canals?
Caused by same mechanism citing above under Itchy Nose. Some allergy sufferers discover itching of ear canals and area between the shoulder blades to be their most frustrating symptoms.

Yes

No

Itchy Palate?
Cause citing under Itchy Nose.

A hard put to scratch in company or without gagging. Patients are sometimes heard clicking their tongue against their palate in an attempt to discover relief.

Yes

No

Hives?
Localized swelling, redness, and itching caused by allergies and numerous other factors. If the swelling goes inward instead of toward the skin surface, the resultant condition is called “angioedema.” 

Yes

No

Count up your number of «yes» answers to see what your allergy probability is:

0-3: Allergies possible but not likely.

If medications assist, you probably own allergies.

You may not need additional treatment.

4-9: Allergies likely.

Medications would probably assist, but you may need additional treatment.

10-14: Allergies extremely probable.

You probably need comprehensive treatment to be comfortable and prevent worsening of your condition.

15-20: Allergies almost certain.

You are probably in harm of experiencing complications of allergy and possibly asthma, and should be on appropriate treatment.

Histamine Intolerance: Could it be causing your symptoms?

For a quick health quiz, consider whether you suffer from any of the following common symptoms:

• Rashes, Hives or Eczema
• Headaches or migraines
• Diarrhea
• Low blood pressure
• Itchy eyes/runny nose/congestion
• Premenstrual cramping or headaches

These are extremely general symptoms and own numerous potential causes, but one possibility that isn’t discussed often is a condition called histamine intolerance.

How histamine intolerance is diagnosed

At this time there are no proven tests to diagnose histamine intolerance short of an elimination diet.

While it is possible to measure blood DAO activity (one of the enzymes listed above), as well as histamine levels in the blood and urine, these results do not seem to correlate significantly with symptoms.

What allergy do i own quiz

Typical blood allergy tests or skin testing will not be positive, as HIT is not IgE mediated (like true allergies).

It is significant to remember that while considering HIT as a cause of symptoms you must assess for related disorders such as true allergies, mast cell disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, fructose malabsorption, little intestinal bacterial overgrowth, colitis etc.

After the evaluation of related disorders, a diet eliminating high histamine foods may be pursued.

If symptoms improve when histamine is lowered or eliminated from the diet you may be histamine intolerant.

Foods high in histamines

This is controversial as the histamine content of food varies depending on the duration of storage, ripeness or maturity, cooking, and processing. Certain foods may also not be high in histamine yet are high in compounds known as histamine liberators which can trigger similar symptoms by increasing histamine levels. The list under contains commonly accepted high histamine foods/histamine liberators, but this list is by no means exhaustive. Available lists vary and consistent data is hard to discover on histamine content of foods.

What does seem to be agreed upon is that fermented and aged foods do tend to be some of the biggest culprits.

• Alcohol: Champagne, red wine, beer, white wine,
• Fermented or smoked Meats/Fish: Sardine, mackerel, herring, tuna, salami
• Pickled or canned foods: Sauerkraut, pickles, relishes, soy sauce
• Fermented milk products: Yogurt, kefir, buttermilk
• Aged cheeses: Parmesan, Gouda, Swiss, cheddar.
• Fruit: Dried fruit, strawberries, citrus
• Vegetables: Tomatoes and tomato products, spinach
• Legumes: Chickpeas, soybeans, peanuts
• Other: Cinnamon, chocolate
• Grains: Wheat
• Histamine releasers: Citrus, papaya, pineapple, nuts, strawberries, egg white, additives
• DAO blockers: alcohol, black and green tea


What is histamine?

Histamine is a compound found in every cells of the body and is a natural component of numerous foods.

It is an significant component of the immune and neurologic systems and is involved in the process of inflammation. Histamine causes a variety of symptoms depending on where it is released and what receptors it binds to.

It’s not the same as a food allergy

With histamine intolerance, symptoms can be triggered by certain foods, but the mechanism is diverse than a food allergy. Some of the symptoms mimic a true allergic reaction, but HIT is not mediated by IgE, so skin testing and blood allergy tests will be negative. HIT is thought to be due to a cumulative build-up of histamine rather than an over-release of histamine.

Because of this, the symptoms may not be immediate. Symptoms may be triggered any time your “threshold” is reached and it may be hard to pinpoint a specific food as the culprit.

For example, you may own consumed histamine wealthy foods in the morning and in the afternoon consumed a low histamine meal. But, the afternoon food was enough to put you over your level of tolerance, so symptoms would happen in the afternoon. You would ponder your symptoms were due to the afternoon food but in reality, your morning foods were a more significant factor.

It may be correlated with other health issues

Histamine intolerance appears to be more prevalent when there is underlying gastrointestinal dysfunction such as in inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, IBS, etc.

Given the minimal data on the actual incidence of histamine intolerance, data on its correlation with other health issues is scant. In alternative medicine circles, it is thought to happen more commonly with dysbiosis or little intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

Treatment for histamine intolerance

It isn’t just diet! Treat any underlying disorder first, as this may improve histamine tolerance.

I generally love to focus on dietary treatments because I prefer to do as much as possible with diet in lieu of medication. But, histamine intolerance truly requires an integrative approach, as it often occurs in conjunction with other disorders that need to be addressed beyond dietary modifications.

Diet: A low histamine diet is the treatment of choice (food lists are below).This can be challenging if someone is already on a restricted diet such as a gluten-free or low FODMAP diet and should be done under the care of a health care practitioner so that proper nutritional intake is maintained.

The tolerance to histamine varies from person to person and the quantity of histamine tolerated must be deduced by trial and error. Some people can only tolerate extremely little amounts and others can be more liberal.

What is significant to note is that tolerance to histamine seems to improve once underlying issues are addressed. For example; if IBS or SIBO are treated, reactions to histamine often decrease. It is imperative to treat the underlying disorder in conjunction with dietary changes.

Once the elimination diet is completed one must individually assess tolerance to specific foods and liberalize the diet as tolerated so that optimum nutrition and lifestyle are attained.

Sleep: 7-8 hours a night helps everything!

Support: Health issues and dietary restrictions are stressful and challenging. Seek out support from family, community, faith organizations, online support groups, local support groups. Avoid those who provide negative interaction. Negative interactions delay healing.

Exercise: Any exercise is helpful.

Purpose for 30-60 minutes daily. Don’t feel bad if you only fit in 15 – it still helps!

Relaxation: The benefits of relaxation techniques cannot be emphasized enough. Breathing exercises or progressive muscle relaxation are simple, portable and free. Yoga and meditation are grand as well. Relaxation for you may also be reading, enjoying time with friends or playing music.

Medications: Antihistamines, topical steroids/creams, oral steroids, topical homeopathic or plant-based creams and lotions for rashes.

Supplements: There is little to no data on these, but the following are sometimes used.

Vit C, B6, Zn, Cu, Magnesium, Mangosteen, Quercetin, DAO promoters and supplements, topical creams. Please use any supplement under the guidance of a practitioner. Supplements can own toxic side effects.

Histamine content app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/food-intolerances/id419098758

Symptom tracker app: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/mysymptoms-food-diary/id405231632?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Books: Attempt a low histamine cookbook. It will make preparing meals easier, especially during the elimination phase.

What are some of the symptoms of histamine intolerance?

• Diarrhea
• Headache
• Flushing
• Rash/Urticaria (hives)/eczema
• Arrhythmia ( irregular heartbeat)
• Low blood pressure due to vasodilation caused by the histamine
• Wheezing
• Runny nose
• Watery eyes
• Angioedema-swelling of face/hands/lips
• Heartburn-due to increased acid production
• Itching- typically of the skin
• PMS- Headaches around the menstrual cycle or painful cramps due to histamine-induced contractions in relation to hormone levels

Food to eat on a low histamine diet

• As much as possible eat unused food
• Unused meat and fish (avoid canned meat and fish)
• Unused fruit, except strawberry, citrus
• Unused vegetables, except tomatoes, spinach, and cabbage
• Grains: rice, corn, millet, oats, sorghum
• Oils: Most cooking oils

See under for lists of high histamine foods and medications to use with caution if you ponder histamine intolerance may be an issue for you.

What is histamine intolerance?

The actual mechanism of histamine intolerance (HIT) is under investigation but is thought to be related to a build-up of histamine.

In a healthy individual, histamine is broken below on a regular basis by two enzymes: DAO and HNMT. The mechanism of HIT is proposed to be a genetic or acquired impairment in one of these two enzymes. DAO is produced in the intestine, so if the intestinal function is compromised there may not be enough DAO to degrade histamine normally.

When build-up occurs, so do symptoms. Decreased DAO  (enzyme) production may be why HIT seems more common in persons with gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, IBS, celiac, and SIBO. DAO activity can also be inhibited by certain medications.

Some physicians question the existence of histamine intolerance as a disease.

HIT is more widely accepted in Europe as a true condition and was recognized in 2012 by the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology as a true disease for which the pathophysiology has yet to be determined.

What to do if you ponder histamine may be a problem for you

If you ponder you may own histamine intolerance, speak to your physician to assess other possible “look-alike” conditions such as true allergies, mast cell disorders or underlying digestive disorders. Once these possibilities own been evaluated and addressed, an elimination diet may be initiated to see if symptoms improve.

A food diary is essential. Underlying issues must be corrected first to optimize improvement. Because the diet is restrictive, especially if added onto an already restricted eating plan, please consult a professional to ensure proper nutritional intake.

Medications to use with caution if HIT is an issue

These medications inhibit the DAO enzyme:

• Acetylcysteine
• Aspirin
• Ambroxol
• Aminophylline
• Amiloride
• Amitryptiline
• Cefuroxime
• Cefotiam
• Cimetidine (Tagamet)
• Ciprofloxacin
• Cyclophosphamide
• Contrast Media

• Docein

• Diazepam (Valium)
• Haldol
• Metamizol
• Metoclopramide (Reglan)
• Naproxen (Aleve)
• Narcotics-Thiopental (IV med.

for surgery)
• Noscapene
• Pancuronium
• Prilocaine
• Verapamil

THIS ARTICLE IS COPYRIGHTED BY AMY BURKHART, MD, RD.

Category:ArticlesBy Amy Burkhart

Take a quiz on Asthma!

Test your knowledge on asthma! Is asthma a leading cause of school absences?

What allergy do i own quiz

Can allergies to dust mites and animal allergens trigger asthma? Take the quiz below to study more!

For additional information on asthma, visit:

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

American Lung Association

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology

Allergy and Asthma Network


Cows’ milk allergy in babies

Cows’ milk allergy (CMA), also called cows’ milk protein allergy, is one of the most common childhood food allergies. It is estimated to affect around 7% of babies under 1, though most children grow out of it by the age of 5.

CMA typically develops when cows’ milk is first introduced into your baby’s diet either in formula or when your baby starts eating solids.

More rarely, it can affect babies who are exclusively breastfed because of cows’ milk from the mother’s diet passing to the baby through breast milk.

There are 2 main types of CMA:

  1. immediate CMA – where symptoms typically start within minutes of having cows’ milk
  2. delayed CMA – where symptoms typically start several hours, or even days, after having cows’ milk


Treatment for CMA

If your baby is diagnosed with CMA, you’ll be offered advice by your GP or an allergy specialist on how to manage their allergy.

You may also be referred to a dietitian.

Treatment involves removing every cows’ milk from your child’s diet for a period of time.

If your baby is formula-fed, your GP can prescribe special baby formula.

What allergy do i own quiz

Do not give your kid any other type of milk without first getting medical advice.

If your baby is exclusively breastfed, the mom will be advised to avoid every cows’ milk products.

Your kid should be assessed every 6 to 12 months to see if they own grown out of their allergy.

Read more about cows’ milk allergy.


Asthma Explained:

Asthma Triggers:

Many people who own asthma also own allergies that trigger asthma symptoms.

What allergy do i own quiz

Once diagnosed with asthma it is significant to determine what is a trigger to assist manage the patient’s asthma. An allergy skin test can assist determine what allergens the patient is allergic to and should avoid to assist prevent an asthma attack. In addition to allergens, pollution, smoke, stress, exercise and freezing air can trigger an asthma attack.

Diagnosing Asthma:

The best way to test for asthma in children and adults is through a medical and family history, a physical exam, and a pulmonary function test (PFT) such as Spirometry or Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) testing.

The exact cause of asthma is not known, yet researchers ponder genetic and environmental factors can contribute to the development of asthma.

The pulmonary function test will measure how well a patient’s lungs are working. FeNO testing measures the concentration of nitric oxide in exhaled breath; this indicates the level of airway inflammation that can be an underlying sign of asthma. FeNO testing can assist lead to a diagnosis when other evidence is lacking.

A primary care physician may refer patients to an allergist due to their special training to diagnose and treat patients with asthma.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease, it is a long-term condition and can be controlled but not cured.

What allergy do i own quiz

Common symptoms of asthma include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness and shortness of breath, however not every people who own asthma own every of these symptoms. Early diagnosis of asthma and proper treatment can assist prevent damage to the lungs.

Asthma Treatment:

If diagnosed, our doctors develop an asthma care plan with our patients to assist them manage their asthma. It’s significant to follow the medication plan and avoid triggers when possible.

Most asthma medicines are inhaled so that the medicine goes where it is most needed — the lungs.

Patients may need to take a long-term control medication daily to assist prevent symptoms, as well as use a quick-relief medication on the occasion that their asthma symptoms flare up. Asthma can also change over time, so it is significant to continue to work with a physician to assist manage asthma symptoms.

If you ponder you own asthma, you need to be evaluated by a board-certified allergist. Family Allergy & Asthma offers a variety of treatment options for asthmatic patients.

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If you ponder your baby is having a reaction to cows’ milk, see your GP to discuss your concerns.

They will be capable to assess if your baby’s symptoms may be caused by a cows’ milk allergy or something else. Make certain you get medical advice before taking cows’ milk out of your child’s diet as it contains significant nutrients.



How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone.

Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


Symptoms of cows’ milk allergy

Cows’ milk allergy can cause a wide range of symptoms, including:

  1. hay fever-like symptoms – such as a runny or blocked nose
  2. digestive problems – such as stomach ache, vomiting, colic, diarrhoea or constipation
  3. skin reactions – such as a red itchy rash or swelling of the lips, face and around the eyes
  4. eczema that does not improve with treatment

Occasionally CMA can cause severe allergic symptoms that come on suddenly, such as swelling in the mouth or throat, wheezing, cough, shortness of breath, and difficult, noisy breathing.

A severe allergic reaction, or anaphylaxis, is a medical emergency – call 999 or go immediately to your local hospital A&E department.


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis. A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness.

Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology. The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis.

It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat. It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library.

As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


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