What allergy causes nasal congestion

Sinus congestion can be caused by numerous things, so it is significant to assess your other symptoms as well. If you own concerns about your symptoms, you should always contact your doctor or health care provider.

  1. Do you own a runny or stuffy nose, headache, and cough? It could be a cold.
  2. Do you own stuffiness and pain and pressure in your face and eyes? It is probably a form of sinus congestion.
  3. Do you own a runny or stuffy nose, fever, body aches, and a cough? It is probably the flu.
  4. Do you own a clear runny nose and itching in the eyes or nose?

    It may be seasonal allergies.

Sinus congestion is a symptom that comes with a lot of upper respiratory infections and illnesses. Most of the time it will go away on its own but sometimes it needs to be treated with medication.

When to See a Doctor for Congestion


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology. The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis.

It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat. It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S.

National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library.

What allergy causes nasal congestion

As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Medications for Sinus Congestion

There are two primary categories of medications to treat the diverse types of sinus congestion. They are known as antihistamines and decongestants.

Antihistamines are used for a runny nose. They assist dry the sinus congestion and slow the nasal drips. Antihistamines are most commonly used to treat seasonal allergies.

Decongestants are used for that stuffy, full feeling in your head.

They reduce the swelling in your nasal passages which allows mucus to drain.

Some common decongestants include Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Sudafed PE (phenylephrine).

Many medications combine one of these decongestants or antihistamines with other medications to make multi-symptom treatments. They are sold under numerous brand names.

Multi-Symptom Freezing and Flu Medications


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

A Cold

  1. What triggers it: A virus.
  2. What it feels like: You can expect a stuffy nose, but also some runny, discolored mucus, Goldsobel explains. You may also experience a sore throat, cough, sneezing, headache, or fatigue.

    Another sign is a rising temperature: Colds often trigger a fever, he says, but sometimes those fevers are so mild that people ponder they own allergies instead.

  3. How endless it lasts: People generally fend off the freezing virus (without treatment) within seven to 10 days, Baroody says. But if your symptoms own lingered past that window of time, you might own sinusitis. If you suspect you own a sinus infection, you should talk to your doctor.

An Allergic Reaction

  1. What triggers it: Allergens cause an allergic reaction. Common indoor allergens include mold, dust, and animal dander, while outdoor triggers include pollen and ragweed.
  2. What it feels like: You may experience some nasal congestion with allergies, but it generally accompanies a runny nose (clear, watery discharge), sneezing, and itchy nose and eyes.

    Allergies never cause a fever, Goldsobel notes.

  3. How endless it lasts: If you own seasonal allergies, you may struggle with allergy symptoms throughout the spring and drop, Dr. Baroody says. If you're allergic to indoor allergens, you may experience symptoms year-round.

How to Treat Congestion

Because sinus infections, colds, and allergies share some similar symptoms, including congestion, medications love nasal sprays, oral antihistamines, and eye drops can assist minimize your discomfort.

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If allergies are to blame, do your best to avoid your known triggers and steer clear of any other potential irritants, such as smoke or air pollution. Long-term treatments love immunotherapy (allergy shots) can assist desensitize you to allergens and improve symptoms over time.

When Colds and Allergies Cause Sinus Infections

Even if your sinus congestion is being caused by allergies or a freezing, it doesn’t mean you won’t develop a sinus infection later on.

In fact, when people own colds or allergies, the lining of the nose will swell up, which prevents mucus from draining properly — and that can then lead to sinusitis, says Goldsobel.

People with allergies and asthma may be more vulnerable to sinusitis, though it's not proven, Baroody says.

If you are at higher risk for sinus infections, you can take steps to prevent them. Don't let allergy symptoms spiral out of control. And, Baroody says, be on the lookout "for the symptoms of sinus infections, and treat them promptly."

What does your sinus congestion glance like? What is it doing? Let's glance at the possibilities.

Do you own a runny nose?

Is your head stuffed up, making it hard to breathe through your nose?

  1. It could be a sinus infection (sinusitis).
  2. It may be a cold.
  3. It may be the flu.

If you own drainage, what color is it?

  1. Clear and thin: It is probably a cold, the flu or allergies.
  2. Green or yellow: This color indicates an infection — but that does not mean it is caused by bacteria.

    What allergy causes nasal congestion

    Viral infections can also cause discolored mucus. See your doctor, but you may not necessarily need antibiotics. It could be sinusitis.

  3. Thick and white or cloudy: It is most likely a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu.
  4. Blood-streaked: This is generally caused by ruptured blood vessels in the nose. It can happen as a result of dry nasal membranes or from blowing your nose too aggressively. Glance at other symptoms to determine whether or not you should see a doctor.

Do you own pressure in your face and eyes?

  1. It is probably a sinus infection (sinusitis).
  2. It may be allergies.



How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically.

Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone. Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


Treating Sinus Congestion Without Medications

A variety of non-medication treatments are available to assist relieve sinus congestion.

Some of the best options include humidifiers, saline nasal sprays, and saline nasal drops.

Humidifiers assist hold moisture in the air and prevent nasal passages from drying out. They are especially effective in the winter.

What allergy causes nasal congestion

With heaters running, the air in our homes tends to dry out quickly, which in turn dries out nasal passages and makes it more hard to breathe. Running a cool mist humidifier, especially while sleeping, will assist reduce the risk of dried nasal passages and thick congested noses in the morning.

Saline nasal spray used a few times a day can assist loosen congestion and improve drainage. This is a safe and effective alternative to medication as saline nasal spray is simply sterile saltwater.

Neti pots own been used for numerous years to rinse out the sinus cavities. There are several varieties available now in almost any pharmacy or store that has a pharmaceutical section.

Using a saline solution, you can use this device that looks love a miniature teapot to rinse the mucus out of your sinuses naturally, without taking medications.

Saline Nose Drops and Bulb Syringe 

Saline nose drops and the bulb syringe can be used in infants to tug out drainage or thick mucus from the nose. Infants breathe only through their noses, so it is significant that the nasal passages remain open. This simple method is effective and does not cause harmful side effects love numerous medications do.

You should take caution not to overuse over-the-counter nasal decongestant sprays (such as Afrin), though.

Using medicated nasal sprays for longer than three to four days can actually increase congestion.

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Allergic rhinitis occurs when allergens in the air are breathed by a patient that is allergic to them, irritating and inflaming the nasal passages. Allergens may include dust mites, pollen, molds, or pet dander. In people who are allergic to them, these particles trigger the release of a chemical in the body that causes nasal congestion, sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose. These symptoms can lead to poor sleep, which can result in significant daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

Allergic rhinitis (allergies) may happen year-round or seasonally.

What allergy causes nasal congestion

When it occurs seasonally it is generally caused by airborne particles from trees, grass, ragweed, or outdoor mold. Causes of year-round allergic rhinitis include indoor substances such as pet dander, indoor mold, cockroach and dust mites in bedding, mattresses, and carpeting.

Sleep problems are common in people with allergic rhinitis.

What allergy causes nasal congestion

One study found that sleep is dramatically impaired by allergic symptoms and that the degree of impairment is related to the severity of those symptoms. In addition, sleep problems are linked with fatigue and daytime sleepiness as well as decreased productivity at work or school, impaired learning and memory, depression, and a reduced quality of life.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a sleep disorder in which breathing is briefly and repeatedly interrupted during sleep, is linked with allergic rhinitis. OSA occurs when the muscles of the throat relax and fail to hold the airway open during sleep.

People with OSA may suffer from severe daytime sleepiness and a range of chronic health problems such as heart disease, stroke, and sexual dysfunction. Nasal congestion, which causes the upper airway to narrow, increases the risk of both snoring and OSA among allergic rhinitis patients. The excellent news is that reducing nasal inflammation may reduce symptoms of snoring and OSA as well as daytime fatigue and sleepiness, according to at least one study.

This is particularly significant for those OSA patients who own trouble with continuous positive airway pressure(CPAP) devices because of nasal congestion.

In addition, research suggests that allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for snoring and OSA among children. Snoring and other sleep problems are linked with poor performance in school, lower IQ, and even brain damage, according to recent research. Parents are urged to pay shut attention to sleep symptoms in children with allergic rhinitis and discuss their children’s sleep with their pediatricians.

With such a high rate of sleep disorders and other health problems among allergic rhinitis patients, getting adequate sleep on a regular basis is essential to maintaining physical and mental health as well as performance, safety, and overall well-being.

According to NSF’s 2006 Sleep in America poll, 15% of American adolescents take medications for allergies.

Additional Info:

Reviewed by David G.

Davila, MD (December 2009).

Common symptoms of sinus infection include:

  1. Pain in the teeth
  2. Postnasal drip
  3. Tenderness of the face (particularly under the eyes or at the bridge of the nose)
  4. Discolored nasal discharge (greenish in color)
  5. Frontal headaches
  6. Fatigue
  7. Coughing
  8. Fever
  9. Nasal stuffiness or congestion
  10. Bad breath

Sinus infection (sinusitis) is often confused with rhinitis, a medical term used to describe the symptoms that accompany nasal inflammation and irritation. Rhinitis only involves the nasal passages. It could be caused by a freezing or allergies.

Allergies can frolic an significant role in chronic (long-lasting) or seasonal rhinitis episodes.

Nasal and sinus passages become swollen, congested, and inflamed in an attempt to flush out offending inhaled particles that trigger allergies. Pollen are seasonal allergens. Molds, dust mites and pet dander can cause symptoms year-round.

Asthma also has been linked to chronic sinus infections. Some people with a chronic nasal inflammation and irritation and/or asthma can develop a type of chronic sinusitis that is not caused by infection. Appropriate treatment of sinus infection often improves asthma symptoms.

How is sinus infection diagnosed?

Diagnosis depends on symptoms and requires an examination of the throat, nose and sinuses.

Your allergist will glance for:

  1. Tenderness of the face
  2. Redness
  3. Swelling of the nasal tissues
  4. Discolored (greenish) nasal discharge
  5. Bad Breath

If your sinus infection lasts longer than eight weeks, or if standard antibiotic treatment is not working, a sinus CT scan may assist your allergist diagnose the problem. Your allergist may examine your nose or sinus openings. The exam uses a endless, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and a light at one finish that is inserted through the nose. It is not painful.

What allergy causes nasal congestion

Your allergist may give you a light anesthetic nasal spray to make you more comfortable.

Mucus cultures: If your sinus infection is chronic or has not improved after several rounds of antibiotics, a mucus culture may assist to determine what is causing the infection. Most mucus samples are taken from the nose. However, it is sometimes necessary to get mucus (or pus) directly from the sinuses.

Knowing what helpful of bacteria is causing the infection can lead to more effective antibiotic therapy.

A fungus could also cause your sinus infection. Confirming the presence of fungus is significant. Fungal sinus infection needs to be treated with antifungal agents, rather than antibiotics. In addition, some forms of fungal sinus infection – allergic fungal sinus infection, for example – do not reply to antifungal agents and often require the use of oral steroids.

Your allergist may consider ordering a sinus CT. This test can assist to define the extent of the infection. Your allergist may also send you to a specialist in allergy and immunology.

The specialist will check for underlying factors such as allergies, asthma, structural defects, or a weakness of the immune system.

Biopsies: A harm of more serious types of fungal sinus infection is that the fungus could penetrate into nearby bone. Only a bone biopsy can determine if this has happened. Biopsies involving sinus tissue are taken with flexible instruments inserted through the nose.

Biopsies of the sinus tissue are also used to test for immotile cilia syndrome, a rare disorder that can cause people to suffer from recurrent infections, including chronic sinus infection, bronchitis and pneumonia.


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